Issue: 19161201

Friday, December 1, 1916
December, 1916
6
True
89
Sunday, December 7, 2014

Articles
cover
803
803
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0001.xml
article
803
803,804,805,806
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Saving Men from Sunken Submarines
Three means by which the crew of a sunken submarine may finally escape
Signaling for Help with Flashlight Buoys
Timing Automobile Speed Demons with a New Device
Novel Method of Drive for Light Cycle-Cars
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Lloyd M. Kuh
"TWELVE-THIRTY o’clock. Respiration is extraordinarily difficult. I mean I am breathing gasoline. “It is 12:40 o’clock.” Such were the last words of the commander of the Japanese “6”, written while imprisoned in the conning-tower of his submarine at the bottom of the sea.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0002.xml
article
807
807,808,809,810,811
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Wigwagging with Hand Flags
How the army talks over hills and valleys
Conventional Signals Used in the Army and Instructions for Wigwagging with Flags
This Ice-Cutting Machine Takes the Place of Eight Horse-Teams
Taking Care of Automobile Tires at the Front
A Wonderful New Glass Which Cannot Be Shattered
Preventing Boiler Troubles by Mechanical Cleaning
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ALTHOUGH their application is limited on account of their small range, the use of hand flags for signaling is authorized by the United States Army. They are chiefly serviceable for incidental signaling or for use within organizations or fixed stations.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0003.xml
article
812
812,813,814,815,816,817,818,819,820,821,822,823,824,825,826,827,828,829
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Why Do We Grow Bald?
Disease and tight hats are not the chief causes. Baldness can be inherited, like other traits
A Bicycle Which Won’t Let You Lose Your Balance
Cork Fabric for Featherweight Raincoats
Scenes in Alaska—the Country that Supplies The World With Sixty Million Salmon Annually
Marooned by the Tide at West Australia
Trapshooting in the Navy
New Cures at the Royal Baths in England
Tropical “Snow Drifts” of Cheesecloth
Here Are a Few Interesting Things to Eat in a Hungry Man’s Gastronomic Trip Around the World
Queer Denizens of the Deep
Is this the Origin of Forcible Feeding?
The Fighting Weapons of Seven Warring Powers
Aeroplane Art of Today
As a Packer Let Us Recommend Mother Nature
Not Candy but Moth and Butterfly Eggs
Japanese Ivory Carvers Working With Modern Tools
A Danger Signal Used to Direct Attention to Overhead Perils
A Locomotive Side-Frame Which Weighs Nearly Seven Tons
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D. Osborn
IT IS popularly supposed that some forms of baldness are caused by the wearing of tight hats. Often the line of baldness seems to coincide with the hat-band, which might show that it is cutting off the supply of nourishment to the scalp. One of the main arguments in support of this theory is that women do not become bald.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0004.xml
article
830
830,831,832
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Catching Fish by Suction
The vacuum cleaner principle applied to fishing on a wholesale scale
A Field Refrigerator for the Camper or Soldier
A Caterpillar-Tread Cart for Conquering Bad Roads
Shooting Soot From Stacks With Blasting Powder
A Wind-Deflecting Lookout Mask for Engineers
An Adjustable Steering Device for the Farmer's Tractor
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THE fish of the deep are getting wiser, if one can take the numerous devices invented for their capture as a criterion. Nets used by fishermen for centuries are apparently being discarded in favor of more recent fishing inventions. One of the most recent of these is an apparatus for enticing the fish into a net and then drawing them up through a pipe to a container on deck.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0005.xml
article
833
833,834,835,836
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Making Air Fit to Breathe
Experimenters are washing it and filtering it in order to free it from dust and bacteria
This Destructive, Gnawing Fire, in a Mammoth Grain Elevator in Ohio, Burned For More Than Twelve Months
Preventing Dust Explosions and Fires in Grain-Separators
A Mechanical Printer for Fac-Simile Letters
An Automatic Safety Fender Which Sets the Brakes
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IT is only recently that health commissions have studied all the conditions that have to be considered in mechanically counteracting drowsiness and the sore throats we get from being shut up all day in our offices, factories, or schools.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0006.xml
article
837
837
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The Flying Mail-Carrier
An aeroplane to carry mail on the Buzzard’s Bay route seems to the Postmaster General to be the solution of a special problem
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THE science of aviation has so far progressed in recent years that now, in the opinion of the Postmaster General and postal authorities, it offers a practical means of carrying mail. To this end bids have been opened for aeroplane service on seven mail routes in Alaska and one in Massachusetts.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0007.xml
article
838
838,839,840,841,842,843,844,845,846,847
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Cleaning Sewers from the Street
Many of the disagreeable features of the work are being eliminated
What Happens in the Stokehold of the Speeding Destroyer
The Sentinels of the Sky Above the War-Zone Trenches
A Palace Which Was Eaten by Horses and Cows
Mistletoe : A Christmas Decoration and a Forest Pest
A Singeing Comb Which Prevents Hair Conflagrations
A Machine for Cleaning Ceilings in Large Buildings
Utilizing the Waste from Welsbach Mantles
Making the Aeroplane Generate Its Own Power for Wireless
An Unusually Fair-Minded Slot Machine
Teaching Music by the Picture Method
An Extension Reel for Electric Lamps
The Old-Fashioned Heavy Paving-Block Gives Place to a New Form
Marathoning at Home on a Special Tread Mill
An Electric Endless-Chain Barge-Loader
Stilts Instead of Overshoes for Muddy Crossings
Flags Made of Wire. They Wave Even When There Is No Breeze
A Caterpillar Three Hundred Feet Long
An “Armless” and Inconspicuous Baby Carrier
Daylight Lamp Signals Will Take the Place of Semaphores
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A NOVEL machine which is designed to clean sewers from the street and thus eliminate much of the disagreeable work in the sewer, has been put on the market by a western manufacturer. The apparatus and its method of operation are shown in the accompanying illustrations.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0008.xml
article
848
848,849
[no value]
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A Quick Method of Measuring Light
The greater the size the greater the accuracy as a measuring instrument where this kind of a sphere is used
A Device Invented by a Blind Doctor to Enable Himself to Write Letters
Why We Remember Those Big Snow-Storms of Youth
A Medicinal Cartridge-Belt for Peaceful Expeditions
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THIS queer-looking apparatus, suggestive of the rind of some Brobdignagian watermelon, is devoted to the innocent purpose of measuring light. We say “rind” advisedly, for the sphere is hollow. It is of a dark color on the outside, and, like the melon rind, white inside, but there the similarity ends, for instead of pulp and seeds one finds at the center of the sphere a whitened fixture designed to hold the electric lamp which is to be tested.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0009.xml
article
850
850,851,852,853,854,855
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Humanity’s Bent Twigs
The marvelous ways in which infantile paralysis, joint deformities and hunchbacks are cured
Cleaning Teeth to Save Lives
The Effects of Infantile Paralysis
What Causes Hunchbacks
A Rescue Saddle for the Fireman Which Leaves His Hands Free
Sheep May Not Like This But It Saves Time
A Heater for Use Over the Flame of a Gas-Jet or Kerosene Lamp
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A. M. Jungmann
FOUR years ago a young Italian couple living in New York looked forward with eager anticipation to the arrival of their firstborn. They hoped it might be a boy. It was. But their joy was much clouded because the child had no feet. There were no ankle-joints—nothing but a large leg-bone.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0010.xml
article
856
856,857,858,859
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Eight Pictures on One Plate
The camera may not lie but it can be made to play tricks
Things Weigh. Then Why Not Let Them Drop Where They Are Wanted?
Corns—What They Are and Why They Hurt
Housekeeping Made Easy
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A SIMPLE attachment for the camera which enables the photographer to secure a number of exposures upon the same plate or film has been invented by Charlie K. Pugh, of Colorado City, Colorado. Two, three, or four pictures may be taken upon different portions of the plate or film without any line of demarcation showing.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0011.xml
article
860
860,861,862,863
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A Dozen Ways of Breaking Your Neck
Would you care to imitate the motion of a corkscrew pulling a stopper out of a bottle? Does the idea of looping-the-loop on roller skates thrill you? Would a dash under water in an open boat make life a little less wearisome? If not, this article will reveal more monotony killers
The Wastebasket of Dizziness
Tobogganning in Summer
Commend Yourself to the Angels When You Ride in This
The Medicinal and Hygienic Virtues of the Lemon
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George Wörts
THE suicidal instinct must lurk deep within us. In its mildest form it displays itself when we march up to a Coney Island neck-breaker and are twisted, turned and hurled by some fiendish contrivance. The barbarian treads keen knife-blades and up-ended nails when the need of self-pain possesses him.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0012.xml
article
864
864
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A Floating Road for Automobiles
A plank roadway built over a California stream enables automobiles to cross under their own power
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A SEMI-FLOATING bridge, one hundred and four feet in length, has been constructed by the California Highway Commission over Castaic Creek on the recently opened Los Angeles to Bakersfield route. The ford at this point has long been a menace to automobile travel, because of the varying depth of water and the extremely sandy bottom.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0013.xml
article
865
865
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Faster Than the Fastest Express Train
The new Curtiss biplane makes one hundred and nineteen miles an hour
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Carl Dienstbach
THE really formidable problem of the aeroplane of to-day is cutting down the resistance of its structure. A very meritorious solution of this problem is found in a new Curtiss biplane which has attained speed and climbing power way beyond the usual range of its allotted motor power.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0014.xml
article
866
866,867,868
[no value]
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Taking the Temperature of a Dam
Forty-seven thermometers are buried in the concrete of the Kensico dam
Will the Great Sphinx Scowl When She Sees This?
Laying a Brilliant Trail for Bargain Hunters
Separating the Rooster from His Crow
The “Step Lively, Please!” of Stage-Coach Times
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Herbert Francis Sherwood
ONE day, a year ago, I paid my first visit to the great Kensico dam, three miles north of White Plains, N. Y., counted among the notable dams of the world. It is intended to form a storage reservoir in the Catskill system of water supply which New York city is constructing at an expenditure of $177,000,000.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0015.xml
article
869
869,870,871
[no value]
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The Intelligent Motor Milk-Wagon
Like the milkman’s trained horse it ambles mechanically on while deliveries are made from door to door
The Mayor of Moscow, Ohio, Is the Town’s One-Man Orchestra
Air-Jet Supports a Football in Mid-Air
How Man’s Eyes Differ from Those of the Animals
Using a Tree as a Mast for a Wireless Station
How Earthquakes and Similar Disturbances Change the Styles in Architecture
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AT LAST the intelligence of a milkman’s or baker’s horse in moving from house to house during deliveries has been duplicated by a device applicable to any type of motor vehicle. It consists of a mechanism which may be set to bring the vehicle automatically to a stop at any desired distance from its position.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0016.xml
article
872
872,873,874,875,876,877
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Twelve Cylinders or Six in One Car
A mere twist of the wrist makes the change
The Cancer Problem and How Modern Science Is Attacking It
Overcoming the City Boy’s Fear of Snakes
Now What Would You Call This New Musical Instrument?
“Great Fleas Have Little Fleas Upon Their Backs to Bite ’Em”
Iridescent Fish-Eggs for Table Decoration
Mechanical Helps Which Fit You to Your Job, and Save Time, Money and Effort
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THE latest thing in automobiles is a car with a twelve-cylinder motor which can be changed to a six by the mere twist of the wrist. While it gives great power for quick acceleration and for hill climbing and flexible control on high gear, the twelve-cylinder motor is nevertheless a large consumer of gasoline and therefore expensive to operate.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0017.xml
article
878
878
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Ax-Handles Made to Order
The boss chopper wants his ax-handles made to suit him
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ALTHOUGH nearly all ax-handles are machine-turned there is still a local demand in logging camps for the hand-made product. The boss choppers and sled-tenders are exacting in their requirements and provide a good business for the professional helve-maker who caters to their particular needs and whims.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0018.xml
article
879
879
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Eyes Were Made to See With
Do you know how to use yours? Read this article and then test them with the picture
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ONE of the fundamentals of life, to which comparatively little attention has been given, is the ability to see straight. Very few of us see what is placed before us or what goes on under our very roses. Fortunately this faculty of observing correctly may be improved by practice, but first we must be made to realize that we are deficient in it.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0019.xml
article
880
880,881
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She Lies on Her Side—But They’ll Raise Her
The “Washingtonian” foundered in ninety feet of water. They are floating her with compressed air
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OUR present-day salvors, who no longer hesitate to attack with undaunted spirit sunken ships which have been given up as hopeless, will watch with interest the bringing of the 26, 1916, the Washingtonian sank in ninety feet of water. Loaded to her full capacity with raw sugar brought from the Hawaiian Islands for Philadelphia, she sank in ten minutes.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0020.xml
article
882
882,883
[no value]
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Plowing Snow with Your Automobile
Front and rear plows on casters which can be adjusted to any motor-vehicle chassis
Stirrup-Stoves Afford Comfort for Cold Horseback Riders
An Electrically Heated Foot-Board for the Policeman
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MOTOR-DRIVEN snow-plows have become a familiar sight in our large cities during severe snowstorms. They can scoop up more snow than a whole army of horse-drawn vehicles, and in some cities, notably New York, they have revolutionized the problem of snow removal.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0021.xml
article
884
884,885,886,887,888,889,890,891
[no value]
[no value]
Asphyxiating a Fire with Sulphur
An apparatus which protects a ship against flames and assures it a clean bill of health
A Platform on Wheels for the Lamp Repairer
Have You Ever Seen a Horse Wearing Trousers?
Why Does Sap Rise in a Tree Against the Pull of Gravity?
A Time-Saving “Safety-First” Tool for Dynamite Workers
If Robinson Crusoe Had Only Thought of This
Curios Made by Glass-Blowers in Their Spare Moments
The Time, Labor, and Money-Savers Among Recent Improvements in Motor-Driven Vehicles
Here Are Some More Practical Ideas Designed to Increase the Usefulness of the Motor Vehicle
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ONE of the lessons learned in fighting ship fires is that the ideal form of extinguisher in an enclosed space like the hold of a ship is a gas which displaces the air by its own specific gravity, and is itself a non-supporter of combustion. This gas is found in sulphur dioxide, made when needed from ordinary commercial sulphur.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0022.xml
article
892
892,893
[no value]
[no value]
Painting Wild Animals’ Eyes
It is the natural expression, not the hypnotic stare that is sought
Warning Herdsmen of the Approach of “Untempered” Storms
Are You Paying for Your Farm or Is It Paying for Itself?
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A. H. Ewing
NOW that taxidermy has become an elaborate art, the sportsman and the museums alike demand an absolutely life-like aspect in a “mounted” specimen. Mr. Wilson Potter of Philadelphia, hunter of big game and taxidermist, has an entire building in the city fitted up with every appliance for perfecting the art of modelling and mounting his trophies of the hunt.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0023.xml
article
894
894,895,896
[no value]
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Renovating the Old Golf Ball
Perhaps this is the great bonanza of which the caddies are dreaming
Johnny Blows Bubbles from His Toy Cigar
Indoor Tomato Plants Fifteen Feet High
Valuable Products May Be Obtained from Cherry Pits
An Automobile-Pump Driven from the Rear Wheel
What? Tail-Lights for Mules! Yes, Here They Are
The Tiniest Motorcycle To Be Used in the Army
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WHEN the golf ball loses its original good looks and the paint begins to chip off and crack, it is thenceforth regarded as practically worthless for a good game. But a ball which has been coated with enamel paint may be cleaned and painted again, making it as good as new.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0024.xml
article
897
897,898,899,900,901,902,903,904,905,906,907
[no value]
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The Giant Destroyer of the Future
Can a juggernaut be built which will annihilate a whole army?
Only the Battleship Is a Real War Machine
Why Not a Battleship On Land?
A Giant Three-Wheeled Armored Car
How Shocks Would Be Absorbed
Only Big Guns Could Stop the Machine
Old Favorites Modernized and Made to Express Action Often Prove the Most Popular of Toys
How Inventors Are Meeting Young America’s Imperious Demand for a Variety of Animated Toys
Gasoline Tank-Trucks as Tenders to Our Submarines
Preaching the Gospel from an Automobile on the way from San Diego to Sweden
An Artistic Grocery Store in a Residential District
Testing the Pulling Power of an Ostrich
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Frank Shuman
A CLUB, a bow and arrow, a blunderbuss, an infantryman’s rifle, a forty-two centimeter howitzer are merely instruments for delivering blows. The essential difference between the battles of prehistoric times and those of today lies in the manner of delivering blows.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0025.xml
article
908
908,909,910,911,912,913
[no value]
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Studying the Stars with Mirrors
The biggest reflecting telescope in the world belongs to Canada
A Mirror Six Feet in Diameter
Different Types of Reflectors
What Good is a Reflecting Telescope?
Anchoring the Henhouse in Cyclone Districts
A British Motor-Bus Run on Ordinary Coal Gas
Determining the Intensity of Illumination by a New Measuring System
Deflecting and Moistening the Air from Furnace Registers
Removing Old Starch from Clothes by a Malt Extract Bath
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Dr. C. Furness
IT IS with the reflecting telescope that many of the most brilliant discoveries about stars are made. Its construction, however, is not so generally understood as that of the refracting telescope, the form of instrument which is so often seen in the parks or on the streets of our cities and through which the passerby can get a peep at the Moon for the trifling sum of five or ten cents.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0026.xml
article
914
914,915
[no value]
[no value]
A Motor-Driven Brake
The pressure of a finger stops the car
A Device for Adjusting the Ends of Steel Rails
Wire Wheels for Automobiles Are Rapidly Taking the Place of Wood
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THE manual labor usually required for the handbrakes of a motor vehicle is avoided by an electric brake requiring only the pressure of one finger to operate it. The device consists of a small electric motor which drives a tiny drum carrying a steel cable attached to the brake-equalizer and to the regular brakedrums.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0027.xml
article
916
916,917,918,919,920
[no value]
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Producing the Coldest Cold
Think of 400 degrees below zero!
Think of gases that have been squeezed and cooled until they look like water!
To Change a Gas into a Liquid—Cool It
How Expansion Cools
Gases That Look Like Water
Strange Things That Happen When Gases Are Liquefied
Transforming a Railroad Water-Tank into a Home for Two
A Combination Lamp and Horn for the Motorcycle
Money Prizes for Motorcyclists Send In Your Kinks
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AMONG the more startling discoveries of the past decade is the production of temperatures reaching as far as 400° F. below zero. It is the attainment of these low temperatures that has brought the chemist and physicist into a new world; for when matter is subjected to such degrees of cold, there is a complete alteration of both its chemical and physical properties.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0028.xml
article
921
921,922,923,924,925,926
[no value]
[no value]
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
Making Artistic Decorative Butterflies in Sheet-Copper
Repairing Automobile Tires to Prevent Bulky Places
A Clever Trick Performed with a Lighted Cigarette
Making Flexible Mirrors from Tinfoil on Celluloid
Grinding Automobile Engine-Valve Seats Set in a Sleeve
A Water-Barrel Elevator in a Well
Secret of Success in Filing Cross-Cut Saws
A Toy Bank of Wood Fastened Together Without Nails
Making a Wood-Burning Heater for the Home
Making the Vibrations of the Voice Draw Designs
Friction Tape Used for Plaster Strips
A Home-Made Heating Arrangement
Starting an Automobile When One Rear Wheel Is On Ice
How to Make a Pendulum Swing Easily
Lifted Tread Sections in Making Automobile Tire Repairs
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TO produce artistic effects representing butterflies in copper requires a little skill, a sheet of copper—about 20-gage—a jeweler’s saw-frame and blades, artist’s oil colors ground in light Japan, two camel’shair brushes—one wide and the other pointed—and a fine drawingpen known as No. 390. The colors of paints and inks used depends upon the design to be executed.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0029.xml
article
927
927,928,929,930,931,932,933,934,935,936,937,938,939,940
[no value]
[no value]
A Motorcycle Bob
Convert Your Motorcycle into an Inexpensive Power Bobsled
Frame Construction
Rear Runners
The Front Runners
Mounting the Motorcycle
Steering Apparatus
The Controls
Filtering Gasoline Through Chamois a Dangerous Performance
Photographic Printing Masks Easily Made
A Buffer to Stop Sprinters in Indoor Sports
Removing Collar on Change-Gear Spindle of Lathe
Making Extended Index Tabs for Books
Changing a Boy’s Handcar into a Mechanically Propelled Sled
Removing a Bushing from a Blind Hole
A Dark-Room Lamp to Be Used Under a Glass Tray
A Sanitary Home-Made Tooth-Brush Holder
A Fountain Attachment for Ordinary Pens
Substitutes for the Ordinary Carpenter's Levels
A Good Substitute for a Solid Round Belt
To Prevent Steel from Rusting After Soldering
Luggage-Carrier to Attach to Your Bicycle
Automobile Carbureter for Heavy Fuel Oils
An Automobile Revolving Washer Made from an Old Rim
How to Make a New Bureau From an Old One
A Quickly Made Silver-Plating Powder
Replacing a Knob on an Aluminum Kettle Top
Grooves Necessary in Giant Motor-Truck Tires
Making Screws Hold in the End Grain of Wood
Adjusting a Storm Sash from the Inside of a House
A Home-Made Photographic Copying-Stand
A Snow Shovel That Prevents the Snow from Sticking
A Makeshift Syphon Fashioned from Paper Tubes and a Thread Spool
Utilizing the Waste Heat from an Open Fireplace
Eliminating Trouble with Toilet Flush-Tanks
Aluminum Alloy for Patterns and Core Boxes
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[no value]
Fredreic B.Hart
IN designing this motor-bob it is assumed that the building will be done by motorcycle owners having limited facilities, therefore everything is made in the simplest form, of materials easily obtained. Except the woodwork, nothing is required beyond some pieces of I-in. gas-pipe, a small piece of boiler-plate for the kingbolt support, some ⅛-in. outside diameter brass tubing and steel wire for the ignition and throttle controls, and some ⅜-in. rod and heavy strap-iron for the clutch-control and gearshift.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0030.xml
article
941
941,942,943,944,945,946
[no value]
[no value]
Building a Speedy Ice-Yatcht
Preventing Exposed Water-Pipes from Freezing
How to Handle Sulphuric Acid with Safety
A Puller to Remove Steering Wheels on Automobiles
Milk as a Lubricant for Drilling in Copper
Lubricating the Working Joints of a Pocket Knife
Compressing Automobile Leaf Springs to Bolt Them
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ANY one who is at all handy with tools and has the ability to build any kind of a boat, will find it easy to construct a first-class ice-yacht from the sketches and scale drawings given. This particular type of craft is a splendid all-round model and is known among ice-boat men as a “wireboat,” because the wire guys run from end to end.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0031.xml
article
947
947,948
[no value]
[no value]
The Amateur - Electrician
And Wireless Operator
Making an Electrically Heated Soldering Iron
An Electric Burglar Alarm Attached to a Door-Lock
A Dead End Switch of the MultiplePoint Type
Making an Emergency Aerial for Wireless
Intensifying Magnetic Fields for an Automobile Dynamo
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AN electric soldering iron is not a tool for the inexperienced person to build; however, with extreme care and the proper materials, a very good tool can be made. An improperly designed and constructed electric soldering iron may often result in fireworks of a dangerous variety.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0032.xml
article
949
949,950,951,952,953,954,955,956,957
[no value]
[no value]
How to Become a Wireless Operator
IV.—Simple Adjustments and Connections
The Test-Buzzer
The Change-Over Switch
The Detector-Protecting Switch
Connecting the Complete Set
Adjusting and Operating
Station for Receiving Only
A Salt Water Polarity Indicator Made from a Burned-Out Fuse
An Electrically-Operated Recording Weather Vane
Operating Furnace Checks and Drafts by Electricity
Transformer Trouble in Radio Transmitting Apparatus
Practicing the Code Without Using a Buzzer
How To Take Up the Slack in Your Aerial Wires
Canada to Protect Her Parks with Radio Service
Preventing Interference of Signals by Amplifying
A New Direct-Current Transmitter for Radio Communication
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T. M. Lewis
IN THE article published last month there were given descriptions of a crystal-detector and stopping-condenser to be made and used in connection with the transmitting set of the October article, for sending wireless messages over a distance of a mile or thereabout.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0033.xml
article
958
958,959
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What Radio Readers Want to Know
Interesting and Instructive Questions and Answers
Dimensions for a Receiving Tuner; Effect of Variometer on Wavelength
Making a Transmitter for an Amateur Station
A Long-Wave Tuner
Lightning Protection, Receiving Coil and Condenser
Call Book; One Kilowatt Transformer
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Q. 1. Please give the dimensions for a 4,000-meter inductively coupled receiving tuner. The secondary winding is to be shunted by a condenser of .0005 microfarads and the primary by one of .001 microfarads. The aerial has a natural wavelength of 450 meters.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0034.xml
article
960
960
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Plans of a Small Modern Dairy Barn
It costs only $500 and it can be enlarged at any time
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W. E. Frudden
IF the dairy business is started with only a few cows and it is expected to increase the herd from year to year it will pay to adopt the barn plans shown in the illustration. If desired the barn may be of cinders which will aid in keeping it dry. The construction is simple, but it is carefully planned to give the proper amount of air space and window surface for each cow and to provide the most convenient left unfinished on the inside temporarily and when the profits from the herd justify the expense it may be boarded and ceiled or plastered.
PopularScience_19161201_0089_006_0035.xml