Issue: 19161101

Wednesday, November 1, 1916
November, 1916
5
True
89
Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Articles
cover
643
643
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0001.xml
article
643
643,644
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Training the Football Tackler
A tackling dummy which moves as if it were a live player running around the end
Measuring the Horsepower of That Baby of Yours
A Magnet Made from Two Discarded Cannons
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FOOTBALL as now Played is a well-balanced, interesting game, with emphasis laid more than ever on the' physical development of the players. During recent years the game has undergone refining at the hands of experienced sportsmen, with the result that open playing is encouraged in preference to the rough and tumble close formation of other seasons.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0002.xml
article
645
645,646,647
[no value]
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A Washstand Light for Garages
Plenty of light is needed in the garage, and so an ingenious, movable box of lights is used
Letting the Jumping Rope Record the Jumps
Why You Hear Well on a Clear, Frosty Night
Increasing the Thrills in Ice-Skating
A High-Speed Bit That Bores Without Choking
Turning the Stationary Tub Into an Electric Washing-Machine
Some Weather Bureau Duties We Overlook in Criticising the Weather Prophet
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THE washing of automobiles in garages which is the regular night work of the attendants, is greatly simplified by the use of the novel lighting device shown in the accompanying illustration. It is hung from the ceiling and may be moved up or down alongside the car according to the part being cleaned.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0003.xml
article
648
648,649,650,651,652,653,654,655,656,657,658,659,660,661,662,663,664,665
[no value]
[no value]
The Mechanics of Shoplifting
The department store parasite turns inventor and devises some ingenious tools for stealing under the detective's eye
The Constant Warfare Between the Trees and the Rocks
A Tree Like the Rock Which Moses Smote with his Rod
The Wiles of the North Sea Blockade Runner
Exercising Machines for Wounded Soldiers
A Fish That Builds a Nest Like a Bird
The Great Hoodoo Temple
Where Germany Gets Her Basalt Paving Blocks
Introducing Our First Anti-Aircraft Gun
The Indian's Conception of Angels and Devils
Some Curious Clocks of Paris
A Great Collapsible Field-Periscope
Watching a Battle Through a Super-Periscope
Supplying the Market with Ducks From
The Largest Duck Farm in the World
Let a Blast of Air Do It
Air Is Stronger Than Human Arms
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FOR sheer cleverness the professional shoplifter deserves the iron cross of thief-dom. He or she (there are just as many men as women in this vocation), must work under the vigilant eyes of detectives. Yet shoplifters ply their trade with seeming indifference, pilfering finery that totals hundreds of thousands of dollars a year.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0004.xml
article
666
666,667,668,669
[no value]
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Dummies That Dance and Play
Wonderful mechanical musicians that smoke, bow, wink and pirouette
Acrobatie and Dancing Dummies
Making a Huge Electrical Map of West Virginia
Collecting Money for Belgians by a Sidewalk Chute
Just How You Wear Out Your Clothes
A New Check Protector No Bigger Than a Pocket Match-Safe
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TWO hundred years ago, before the days of the steam engine and of the factory, the inventive ingenuity of a mechanic, who was bubbling over with ideas, expressed itself in the making of huge automatons—artificial human beings crammed with clockwork and capable of executing with astonishing fidelity acts which seemed to require the control of a brain.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0005.xml
article
670
670,671,672,673,674
[no value]
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The Thousand-Foot Battleship
Commander Moffett's daring plan to beat the world
Puts Limit at 60,000 Tons
To quote Commander Moffett:
Strenuous Search for Durable Roads in a St. Louis Park
Charging the Weak Magnetos of Automobiles
Lifting Street Cars with a Powerful Electric Hoist
Getting Drunk with a Pair of Ordinary Opera Glasses
A Tiny Portable Hoisting Engine of Dual Power
Why the Rain Follows the Thunder and Lightning
A Tobacco-Can with a Roll of Cigarette Papers Attached to It
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HITTING a target at ten miles with fifteen-inch guns seems so easy a task in view of the naval battles fought off the Dogger Bank and Jutland that Admiral Sir Cyprian Bridge of the British Navy, maintains that it is inadvisable to build warships bigger than those now in commission.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0006.xml
article
675
675
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The Handiest Barn Ever Built
Hay, grain and water are all stored in the center
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A BARN, built like a fort, with the feeding-hoppers and watering - troughs grouped together around the center of the building, has been patented by Peter O. Swedberg, of Marshalltown, Iowa. The barn is constructed of cement blocks. It consists in the main of two cylindrical walls, one within the other.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0007.xml
article
676
676,677
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A Modern "Newspaper Maker"
Sitting Down in Comfort on a Painter's Job
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THE speediest printing press in the world, having an hourly capacity of 65,000 newspapers, has been completed for the New York Herald. Henry Wise Wood is the designer and constructor. The new press embodies a vast number of improvements, so that in spite of its tremendous speed the attention it requires is even less than that of the ordinary newspaper press.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0008.xml
article
678
678,679
[no value]
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Is Jupiter Launching a Moon?
The mysterious Great Red Spot on the biggest of planets and what it means to astronomers
Is Jupiter Launching a Moon?
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IF JUPITER were cut up into one thousand three hundred pieces, each would be larger than the Earth. All the planets together do not weigh half as much as Jupiter. Only the Sun surpasses Jupiter in size. A year on the planet Jupiter is equal to twelve of our years.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0009.xml
article
680
680,681,682,683,684,685,686,687,688,689,690,691
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Serving Yourself to a Shave
You don’t tip anybody and you don’t have to wait
A Novel Device for Generating Fresh Air in Submarines
Electric Hand Lantern Costs Less Than a Kerosene Burner
Electric Ranges Are Becoming Popular
Using the Telephone on the Rifle Range
Two Mines Which Make Marine Warfare More Terrible
The Deepest Known Place in the Ocean
A Humane Method of Destroying Horses with Illuminating Gas
New Apparatus for Setting Broken Bones
Rubber-Ball Fender to Protect Unwary Pedestrians
An Automatic Brake for Freight Trucks
Cleaning and Sorting Beans by Machinery
Electrical Extraction of Gold from Black Sand
Steaming Frozen Ground for Gold
Look Out! Perhaps the Man You’re Talking to Wears a Detectaphone
The Hose Is Mightier and Quicker Than the Brush
Recording the Vibrations of a MotorTruck Spring
Giant Slabs of Marble to Commemorate Abraham Lincoln
Meerschaum as a Building Material in Spain
There's No Place Like a Mechanical Home
Here They Are: The Newest Things for the Home
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ON FIFTH Avenue in Chicago is the first "shaveteria" ever built. You serve yourself to a shave there, just as you serve yourself with food at a caféteria. When you are in a hurry for a shave, and you know that you could do it twice as quickly as it could be done in a barber's chair, you step into the shaveteria.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0010.xml
article
692
692,693
[no value]
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Our Bad Tempers
What makes you angry? Why do you fly in a rage when the soup is salty? Blame it on your grandfather
The Difference Between a Store Thermometer and an Official Thermometer
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G. Davenport
THAT bad temper is due more to an inside state than to outside conditions is demonstrated by the fact that the same mild stimulus causes so much more violent behavior in some individuals than in others. In other words it takes little or nothing to make some persons lose their temper.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0011.xml
article
694
694,695
[no value]
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A Deadly Man-Steered Torpedo
Would you pilot five hundred pounds of gun-cotton toward a hostile battleship and brave gun-fire ?
The Air-Glider Which a German Boy Is Building
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THE modern Whitehead automobile torpedo is by far the most feared weapon of modern naval warfare. It is, in effect, a little automatic submarine boat, with engines and rudders controlled by a mechanical brain. The soul of the torpedo is the gyroscope-a flywheel spinning at several thousand revolutions per minute.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0012.xml
article
696
696,697
[no value]
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Using the X-Ray on Animals
A laboratory for finding out what ails injured horses, cows, cats, dogs, and birds
Coal-Mine Fatalities in the United States During 1915
A Simple Instrument Which Measures the Height of a Tree
In His Merry “Dogmobile.” How a Cripple Gets Along in the World
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WHILE medical annals have been recording the marvelous work of the X-Ray in saving human life, and volumes have been written of the work of the great experimenters, a New York doctor has been carrying this saving light of science into another field—that of our four-footed neighbors.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0013.xml
article
698
698,699,700,701,702,703
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The Honeybee’s Infernal Machine
Here It Is: The New Shaving Harness That Carries Brush, Mug, and Mirror
When You Leave the Automobile, Lock the Robes!
Is the Automobile Inventor Earning His Salt These Days? Here Is the Answer in Pictures
New Accessories for the Motor Car and Sturdy
Truck Which Are Making Them More Versatile
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IN proportion to its size, the sting of the honeybee is probably the most effective infernal machine in existence. The stinging apparatus is smaller than that of a rattlesnake, yet a single sting has been known to kill a man. When we realize that it is almost invisible, and consider what it can do, we cannot fail to be astounded.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0014.xml
article
704
704,705
[no value]
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Patroling Eight Miles of Fence
How hunters and hounds protected a flock of sheep and how a new type of fence was built to keep out coyotes
“Bon Voyage” to the Ohio State Building !
To Protect the Fingers of the Woodworker
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TO prevent wolves, coyotes, and other wild animals from entering a pasture where experiments in sheep-raising were being conducted, hunters employed by the Forest Service were required to patrol eight miles of fence twice a day in the Wallowa National Forest, in Oregon.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0015.xml
article
706
706,707
[no value]
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Protecting the Telephone Operator
How the loud-speaking telephone eliminates danger from high-tension currents
Protecting the Ears from the Shock of Great Guns
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ELECTRIC traction and power companies usually have their telephone lines on the same poles with hightension feederand transmitter-conductors. As a result, telephone users may be exposed to danger. The high-tension lines may cross or touch telephone lines, or the induced current in the telephone lines, due to their being parallel to the high-tension line, may be sufficiently great to place the telephone operator in imminent danger.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0016.xml
article
708
708,709,710
[no value]
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Improving the Imperfect Hen
Ingenious man, after considering the hen, reduces her to a mere egg-laying machine
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George Wørts
IF occasional assaults upon the patent office by ingenious, inventive gentlemen from all parts of this country are to be taken seriously, Mother Nature made some silly mistakes when she devised and constructed the gallus domesticus, otherwise known as the barnyard fowl.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0017.xml
article
711
711,712,713,714,715
[no value]
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Telegraphing Through the Ocean
So that ships may avoid one another in a fog, Christian Berger converts them into huge violins which send out sound-wave signals
Combined Velocipede and Hobby-Horse
Felling Trees Economically with a Mechanical Swordfish
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THE small-town American boy has a noise-making toy, which for simplicity, cheapness, and, above all, effectiveness, can hardly be surpassed. The principal components of the contrivance are: one tomatocan, one string, one lump of resin, and plenty of muscle in the small boy's right forearm.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0018.xml
article
716
716,717
[no value]
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A Daylight Developing-Tank
An ingenious apparatus which enables the photographer to develop his photographic plates in daylight
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ALL outdoors is the vast laboratory of the camera enthusiast when he is taking pictures; but when he develops them he has to confine himself to a stuffy, insanitary darkroom and there work as best he can with acids, despite the developing tanks on the market.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0019.xml
article
718
718,719
[no value]
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Toys That Obey Your Voice
Talk, sing, whistle, clap your hands and they perform their antics for you
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WITHIN the last two or three years a number of inventors have turned their attention to the making of toys. The result has been a series of contrivances of great originality and novelty. As an example of these new arrivals, the various sets made up of toy I-beams and cog-wheels and such by which young builders construct marvels in the way of bridges and engines and clocks, etc., may be cited.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0020.xml
article
720
720
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Boring by Photography
Keeping a Deep Hole Straight
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IN ALL deep borings the diamond drill deviates considerably from its starting direction, and it is sometimes very desirable to obtain a survey of the hole. The device here shown, which is the invention of Charles B. Galvin, of Cornwall-on-Hudson, New York, consists of a steel tube, ranging from fifteen to thirty feet long, with means for indicating and recording any departure of its axis from a straight line.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0021.xml
article
721
721,722,723
[no value]
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Defending the United States with Motor Torpedo Boats
How deadly torpedoes can be safely carried on high-speed motor boats and how the landing of an enemy could be prevented by their means
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Edward F. Chandler
ON THE Atlantic coast alone there are no less than one hundred and sixteen undefended points where an enemy could land troops. New York, long considered invulnerable, is in reality helpless. Its guns are so mounted that an enemy fleet could lie off Far Rockaway and throw shells into Fourteenth Street.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0022.xml
article
724
724,725,726,727
[no value]
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The Automobile Street-Car
Six-wheeled traffic carriers which are remarkable for their short-turning radius and for their flexibility
Wonderful Six-Wheeled Automobiles
A Water Curtain to Protect Workmen from Intense Heat
How Nature Puts the Pop in Popcorn
A Mail Box Big Enough to Keep House In
A “Sandwich-Man” Clad in an Imitation Bullet
Kneading Potter’s Clay with the Bare Feet
Why Gold Pieces Are Always “Doctored”
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EVOLVED from the jitney, a new type of trailer has been built to convert any automobile into an eighteen-passenger bus. It is based on the century-old principle that an animal or vehicle can pull more than it can carry. Yet the vehicle is new in that it is the first application of the trailer principle for hauling passengers, and in that the trailerwheels track with those of the auto mobile, to which it is attached by anew means, thus producing a vehicle of shortturning radius, an advantage on congested streets.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0023.xml
article
728
728,729,730,731,732
[no value]
[no value]
Quebec’s Disastrous Bridge
How the principle of a diver’s spring board is applied in the building of the biggest cantilever bridge
The Quebec Bridge—A Modern Wonder of the World and the Terrible Disaster that Befell It
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C. E. Drayer
THE new Quebec cantilever bridge ranks among the most important and brilliant of all construction. The boldness of a great general in war pales by the side of the courage of its builders, who had little precedent to follow in some of its vital and most difficult features of design and erection. Besides, they had to proceed in the shadow of the ghastly catastrophe of its predecessor which crumpled and fell, carrying to death nearly a hundred men.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0024.xml
article
733
733,734,735,736
[no value]
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Making the Music Fit the Screen
The picture is rehearsed with the orchestra accompaniment and mechanical cues prepared
Ordering Meals Electrically in Quick Lunch Restaurants
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WHEN the hero’s mother is gasping her final blessing as she prepares to depart from the screen to a celluloid heaven and the orchestra in the pit accompanies the pathetic scene with a deafening beating of cymbals and a joyous roaring of snare drums to the tune of “A Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight,” it is no wonder that an audience decides that capital punishment for certain orchestra leaders would be an excellent thing.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0025.xml
article
737
737,738,739
[no value]
[no value]
Miniature Magnet-Propeled Ships
The mysteries of window attractions explained
Teaching English Girls the Art of Milking
An Inventor Invents Because He Can't Help It
Doing the Family Washing in Your Rocking-Chair
Watching Dishonest Employees with the Aid of Mirrors
The Inventor of the Steam Engine Was Interested in Gim-Cracks
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IN MODEL representations of the Panama Canal, New York harbor and miniature naval engagements, vessels of different sizes are made to sail through little waterways in a manner truly mysterious, due to an invention by Louis E. Myers, of Chicago.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0026.xml
article
740
740
[no value]
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Breaking a Mountain Trail
Wheels had to be taken off and caterpillar treads substituted, and bridges had to be built
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THE one annual sporting event in Southern California which is of unusual interest is breaking the trail into Big Bear Valley, a fishing and hunting resort on top of the San Bernardino Mountains, at an elevation of seven thousand feet. For years the automobile men and enthusiasts have contested for the honor of being the first to make the trip after the opening of the new year.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0027.xml
article
741
741,742,743
[no value]
[no value]
“Shooting” Birds with a Camera
Making intimate pictures of bird-life
Hearing Your Voice Through Your Bones
A Motor-Wheel for the Railroad Velocipede
The driver can recline in his seat, operate the motor and speed over the tracks without expending energy
The "Permanent Wave" of a Woman's Hair and Its Secret
The Lure of the Lorelei Minus the Siren
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To secure photographs of bird life so that the plumage detail, identification marks and such matters dear to the heart of the trained bird student or to those who merely delight in viewing pictures of nature, a large image of the object photographed must be secured.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0028.xml
article
744
744,745,746,747,748
[no value]
[no value]
Resuscitating the Drowned
A first-aid tilting machine
Nature and Not Cannons the Real Cause of Rainfall
Flushing Streets with Streams from Movable Pipe-Lines
The Northern Logger Is the Nerviest of Our Steeplejacks
Automatic Word Signals for Automobiles
Lifting Invalids with a Minimum of Discomfort
How a Tiny Screw Held Up a Great City’s Business
Branding Animals with a ClampButton Monogram
How West Indians Walk Up Coconut-Palm Trees
Manhole Ventilated with Electric Fan to Cool Men Below
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THE usual methods of reviving the apparently dead aim to aid respiration. These methods produce a rhythmical filling of the chest with air. Unfortunately they require the aid of several welltrained attendants for a considerable time, and such aid may not always be at hand.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0029.xml
article
749
749,750,751,752
[no value]
[no value]
What Becomes of Old Army Rifles?
Instead of beating swords and guns into pruning-hooks and ploughshares, the Government sells them to motion-picture companies
Making the Water from a Faucet Vibrate Fifteen Times a Second
Saving Gold and Silver on the Vacuum-Cleaner Principle
A Pipe Filler Which Takes the Place of the Smoker’s Fingers
Reducing the Furnace Man to a Mere Push-Button
A Magic Wand Which Changes Cold Water Into Hot Almost Instantly
A Comfortable Electric FootWarmer Pad
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WHENEVER the army and navy officials find that they have on hand a considerable quantity of supplies which for some reason are no longer usable, they condemn the equipment, arrange it in various lots, and call for sealed bids. These supplies usually include a great variety of articles ranging from corkscrews to cannons, from sailors’ shirts to submarines, from a few hundred mess pans to millions of cartridges—a miscellaneous and heterogeneous stock, which only a daring man would buy and only a genius could utilize.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0030.xml
article
753
753,754,755
[no value]
[no value]
Timing an Automobile Race
The Mechanism of the Judges’ Stand
Timing an Automobile Race
Backing an Automobile into a Moving Garage
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WHEN twenty or more racing automobiles lined up for the start in the big speedway races during this summer and fall, Numbers 13 and 20 were missing. Number 13 was out because no driver will risk his life in a car with that ill-omened designation. Number 20 was omitted because of a mistake which occurred in the important Astor Cup race last year and which temporarily reversed the order of finish and almost resulted in the loss of $1,500 to the misplaced racer.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0031.xml
article
756
756,757,758,759,760
[no value]
[no value]
The Electric Thief-Catcher
It rings a bell, takes a photograph of a burglar, and shoots him as soon as it sees his flashlight
Shot by His Own Flashlight
Field Photograph Kit for the Use of the Artillery
A Show-Window Advertising Device Operated by Gas Bubbles
Money Prizes for Motorcyclists Send In Your Kinks
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B. F. Miessner
ALTHOUGH this apparatus accomplishes some startling results, the idea of selenium-actuated burglar alarms is not altogether new. M. Dafah, a French engineer at Jansac, suggested the use of selenium for this purpose several years ago; others have worked along similar lines.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0032.xml
article
761
761,762,763,764,765,766
[no value]
[no value]
For Practical Workers
A Foot-Warmer Attachment for a Radiator
How Electricity and Temperature Affect a Watch
A Combination Tool With Many Uses
Marking Points to Bore Holes for Dowels
Painting a Ladderless Standpipe
To Keep the Water in the Aquarium Clean and Fresh
Making a Serviceable Fireless Cooker
Loosening a Wood Screw to Draw It Easily
Transforming a Wheelbarrow into a Fantastic Toy
Constructing a Sidecar for a Bicycle or Motorcycle
An Improved Grinder for GasEngine Valves
A Fire-and-Water Proof Cement for Mending Stove Fire-Brick
A Revolving Telephone Index on the Transmitter
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THE fact that air currents pass up through the sections of a steam or hot water radiator so that the heat rises before dispersing throughout the room accounts for the floor under the radiator being a poor place to warm the feet. The shelf arrangement shown in the illustration will be found very convenient for supporting the feet at a comfortable height near the side of the radiator c1ose to the heat.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0033.xml
article
767
767,768,769,770,771,772,773,774,775,776
[no value]
[no value]
How to Build a STEREOPTIONI Thomas Stanley curtis
A Substitute Blow Torch for Soldering Joints
To Make a Storm Vestibule on a Veranda
An Easy Method for Drilling Holes in Glass
Utilizing a Piano Stool as a Typewriter Stand
An Emergency Clothes Hanger for the Traveler
A Scheme for Soldering Metals Difficult to Join
A Heat Deflector for a Hot Air Register
How to Straighten the Crooked Straws of a Broom
An Automatic Cleaner for Bicycle Hubs
An Improved Force-Filter Which Is Easily Cleaned
Plane Blade Clamp and Emery Wheel Guide
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THE construction of a small stereopticon for use in the home or lecture room is an easy task for the workman who possesses the usual tools, such as a hacksaw, small drill-press, taps, dies, etc. The design presented herewith is one well adapted to amateur construction, and in the finished instrument the builder will have one which incorporates, in a simplified manner, everything which makes for comfort and efficiency in operation.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0034.xml
article
777
777,778,779,780,781,782,783,784
[no value]
[no value]
A Halloween Chamber of Horrors
An Alarm-Clock Dinner Bell for Old Dobbin
An Experiment with the Static Electricity from Belts
Brackets for Double Sheets of Wrapping Paper
Keeping Roasted Peanuts Hot on a Steam Radiator
An Automatic Grain-Valve to Prevent Waste
Making Storm-Sashes from Old Shutter-Frames
Getting Maximum Service from a Typewriter Ribbon
Lubricating Automobile Spring Shackles and Bolts
A Pocket Flash-Lamp on the Bicycle-Handlebar
Fillers for the Pedal Slots of Automobiles
Estimating the Speed of Passing Automobiles
A Practical Pulverizer Made From a Cutter-Bar
Making a Sediment Pocket in Feed Line to Carburetor
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[no value]
C. E. Fanning
HALLOWEEN entertainments where young people of both sexes participate are usually characterized by merrymaking in which witches of a more or less friendly type are the principal feature; but where none but brave scouts of the genus homo are present, as at a club or a boys’ school, the horrors may be as real as they can be made. The “Chamber of Horrors” described here was fitted up by boy students last October 31, and the thrills and shivers which the participants in the fun received are not yet forgotten.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0035.xml
article
785
785,786
[no value]
[no value]
A Four-Family Apartment House
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
George M. Petersen
THE four-family apartment house, and apartment houses in general, are, properly speaking, tenement houses and are so classed under the rules of the Board of Health and Bureau of Buildings in most of the cities of this country. While the origin of the four-family apartment is somewhat mysterious, it was probably designed by someone who wanted the class of tenants known in the large cities as "flat dwellers" and who also wanted more rents than could be obtained from a two-family house.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0036.xml
article
787
787,788
[no value]
[no value]
The Amateur - Electrician And Wireless Operator
An Improvised Coil Winder for Electrical Apparatus
De-Sulphating Storage Battery Plates
Insulated Plier Handles with Fuse Cases
Making an Alternate Current Buzzer From Old Bell Coils
A Home-Made Flood-Light Projector for Construction Work
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COIL winding is a very difficult operation for the amateur, especially where it is desired to have the outside surface smooth and neat. To do it correctly the spool upon which the wire is wound must be revolved at a medium speed while the wire is fed on with a guide or by hand.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0037.xml
article
789
789,790,791,792,793
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How to Become a Wireless Operator
III.—The Construction of a One-Mile Receiver
The Detector
The Telephones
The Blocking Condenser
Additional Apparatus
Caring for Storage-Batteries on Automobiles
Discarded Type-Cases in the Amateur’s Shop
A New Method of Reviving Old Dry Batteries
A Home-Made Fuse for a Small Battery Current
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T. M. Lewis
IT IS most important for a student of wireless telegraphy to learn all about the operation of the various forms of receiving apparatus. The best way to become familiar with the instruments is to build and operate them. The simple buzzer-sender and microphone receiver which were described in the first article of this series served to illustrate the principles which are followed in all wireless apparatus, but were of such small signaling range that they could not demonstrate fully the details of modern instruments.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0038.xml
article
794
794,795,796
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Amateur Trench Electricians
How the soldiers in the French trenches utilize shell cases, brass scraps, and old muskets to spy electrically on the enemy
A Simple Plan to Avoid Clouded and Grimy Ceilings
To Prevent Asphaltum in Cans from Evaporating
Making an Inductance Switch for Radio Work
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George Kenneth End
IN a bombproof dugout under an auxiliary station not far from Fort Tavannes in the Verdun theater of the war, an electrician has installed a crude little wireless apparatus. This young Edison of the trenches is the leader of a group of expert electricians assigned to one of the most difficult and most dangerous jobs on the front.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0039.xml
article
797
797,798,799,800,802
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What Radio Readers Want to Know
Interesting and Instructive Questions and Answers
Construction of a Transformer; License for Experimental Station; Operation of Alternating Current Arc Sets
Audion Circuits of a “Beat” Receiver; Equipment for a 5-Mile Range; Quenched and Rotary Gaps
Receiving Wavelength
Damped Wave Reception on Oscillating Audion
Long Distance Stations
Strength of Received Signals Where Connecting Leads Are Long
Simple Method of Remagnetizing Magnets
The Telephone Receiver for Wireless Apparatus
The Construction of a Small Concrete Corn-Crib
Experiments with Antennas of Varying Lengths
A Detachable Conning Tower Lessens Submarine Risks
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E. D., St. Joseph, Mo., inquires: Q. 1. Please give the details of construction for a I-K.W. open core transformer and advise how far I may expect to send with it? A. 1. An efficient transformer that will give a secondary voltage of about 18,000 when connected to a 60-cycle source of current supply may be constructed in the following manner: Assemble a core 3 in.
PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0040.xml
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801
801
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Popular Science Monthly Gift Club
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Popular Science Monthly Gift Club
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PopularScience_19161101_0089_005_0041.xml