Issue: 19161001

Sunday, October 1, 1916
October, 1916
4
True
89
Friday, December 5, 2014

Articles
cover
483
483
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0001.xml
article
483
483,484,485,486,487,488,489,490,491,492,493,494,495,496,497,498,499,500,501,502,503
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Wild Animals That Photograph Themselves
Building a Bank Around a Bank Without Disturbing Business
Steel Cutlery Which Will Not Rust Under Any Circumstances
A Mechanical Masseur That Works Off Fat and Soothes the Nerves
Taking a Census of Occupational Diseases
Transporting the Wounded Man in Comfort
Bird’s-Eye View of an Aviation Camp Near the Great Battlefield of Verdun Made from an Aeroplane
With the Fighting Legions in France
Sowing Fifteen-Inch Seeds with the Big Guns
Ammunition to Blaze the Way at Verdun
The Stuff That Modern Victories Are Made Of
Pets and the Gentler Side of the Fighter
Restoring the Hearing of Deafened French Soldiers
Insect Grotesques Which Assume Frightful and Imitative Forms as a Means of Self-Protection
When Nature Plays the Architect of Bridges
Her Tools Are the Elements and World-Old Rock
Queer Uses of Railway Cars
How London Cares for Soldiers’ Babies
And This in a Mechanical Age!
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PHOTOGRAPHING by flashlight is one of the more recent advancements in the field of picture-taking which has helped to secure for photography a permanent place among the arts. Paul J. Rainey, the explorer and hunter of wild animals, proved several years ago at the first exhibition of his wild animal flashlight pictures taken in Africa, that this class of photography offered a virgin field to the manufacturer of apparatus and to the man behind the camera.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0002.xml
article
504
504,505,506,507
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Lost Comets and Their Story
Thrown Off the Track by Jupiter
Halley’s Famous Comet
What Became of the Comet of 1264?
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J. F. Springer
PERHAPS the most mysterious of all the heavenly bodies are the comets. Some are never seen except with the telescope, or else they appear as faint starlike bodies in the sky; others blaze forth, grotesque and fantastic of figure and brilliant in appearance, to excite and appal the ignorant.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0003.xml
article
508
508
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Pumping Gasoline to the Motor
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AWESTERN manufacturer is marketing a device designed to eliminate the troubles encountered in the feeding of gasoline to the motor of an automobile from a tank by gravity during hill-climbing, when the carburetor is higher than the tank, or for keeping the feed-lines from leaking when the pressure system is used.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0004.xml
article
509
509,510,511,512,513,514
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Decoy Ducks that Quack and Swim
A Famous Outdoor Organ
A Curious Clock Built on a New Principle
A Heat-Resisting Socket for High Wattage Lamps
The Money Value of Two Great Discoveries
Freak Trees. How Did They Happen?
A Slab of Sandstone Seventy-Five Million Years Old
A Curious Egg Shaped Like a Dumb-Bell
Would You Recognize the Ear-Bone of a Whale If You Saw One?
Putting Wheels Under Workmen Saves Time and Money
The Old Fondness for Cycling Is Coming Back
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WHEN Amos C. Vaughan of Anadarko, Oklahoma, goes duck shooting he takes with him a set of his mechanical decoys and places them in the water in front of his blind. Before doing so, however, he winds them up. When a flock of wild ducks appears his decoys begin to swim about and quack as if they were alive.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0005.xml
article
515
515,516,517,518,519
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Harnessing the Sun
Shipping Sugar-Coated Education by the Trunkful
Have You Perchance a “Vocational Disease?”
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Waldemar Kaempffert
IF a boy can burn his name on a wooden bench with nothing but the aid of a convex lens and the sun’s rays, why is it not possible to make the sun boil water, generate steam, and drive an engine? It seems absurd to burn coal costing from three dollars to thirty dollars a ton, depending upon your latitude and longitude, when the earth is deluged with heat.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0006.xml
article
520
520
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Pocket-Flashlight Distress-Signals
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A NEW system of warning approaching vessels along the Atlantic Coast when danger is near and of signaling to craft in distress has been adopted by the United States Coast Guard. It involves the use of pocket electric flashlights instead of the flaring red torches formerly employed.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0007.xml
article
521
521,522
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Piping Oil to Ships at Sea
How the Pipe Line Is Laid
A Fog-Stick Guide for Traffic on the Great Lakes
Why the Color of Sea Water Is Blue or Green
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GREAT oil regions lie to the west of Tuxpan, which Mexican city, in consequence, has become a most convenient point for exporting oil. However, there are neither docking nor harbor facilities, because of an immense sandbar which effectually prevents ocean-going vessels from approaching the city much nearer than a mile.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0008.xml
article
523
523,524,525,526,527,528
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War Progress in Flying
Salvation Lies in High Power
And Yet, the Aeroplane Is Unchanged
Has the Big Aeroplane Come to Stay?
Crossing Dangerous Rivers with Goatskin Floats
Where Beautiful Hair Is Not a Crowning Glory
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Carl Dienstbach
THE way aeroplanes were flown before the war seems almost ridiculous now, after men have really learned how to fly as the result of war’s exigencies. The old way made them an easy prey for anti-aircraft guns and for attacking machines. When it became necessary to dart out of the range of a high-angle battery, which had suddenly revealed its presence with bursting shrapnel, or when only a quick maneuver could prevent a hostile machine from blocking the way home, the old-fashioned, steady, level flyer and slow climber proved a very death-trap.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0009.xml
article
529
529
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The Motorcycle Machine-Gun
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WILL the motorcycle supplant the cavalry horse in modern warfare? Our army officers are not ready to give an answer one way or the other at present, but since March 30, 1916, up to which time the motorcycle had been used only for messenger service in the United States Army, Brigadier-General George Bell, Jr., had been testing the armored machine-gun car to determine whether it may not eventually supplant the cavalry horse.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0010.xml
article
530
530,531,532,533,534
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Hunting the Mud Pigeon
How the Clay Birds are Launched
The Rules that Govern Trapshooting
How the “Events” are Conducted
Eliminating One of the Tortures of the Dentist’s Chair
It Was a Man Dressmaker Who Invented This
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Edward C. Crossman
FIVE strong men stood in a row, armed with guns and evidently much interested in something that was going to happen in the little house out in front of them. There was not much to the little house. It stood possibly a foot and a half high at the back end, toward the shooters, and six inches higher at the front.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0011.xml
article
535
535,536
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Preserving the Orchestra Leader’s Art
A Hand-Magnet That Lifts Fifteen Times Its Own Weight
Mooring-Hook Locks Itself to Eyebolt
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THE special talents possessed by celebrated orchestra leaders are to be immortalized. What is more, it now becomes possible for the same leader to direct hundreds of bands at once from a motion-picture screen. An orchestra leader must be photographed both as he appears to his musicians and to his audience—in other words, he must be photographed in front and in back.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0012.xml
article
537
537,538,539,540,541,542,543,544
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Holding the Hudson at Bay
Some New Ideas Which Automobilists Are Employing to Make of the Motor-Truck a Mechanical Day Laborer
Inventions Which Improve the Motor-Truck and Make Motoring Even More Pleasurable and Less Expensive
Road-Construction Facts by the Wayside
“Troubleshooting” at Night with the Aid of a Searchlight
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TO make way for the giant steamship piers which when finished will enable the world’s largest ocean-liners to dock within a few minutes, instead of a few hours, which is now the case, the City of New York, through its Department of Docks and Ferries has constructed a cofferdam which holds sixty-eight feet of the Hudson River at bay while workmen are clearing out rock from the river-bottom and laying the shore-ends of the piers.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0013.xml
article
545
545
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A Motor-Truck That Equals Two
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TWO demountable bodies and a novel inclined platform have enabled a motor-truck owned by an Eastern manufacturer of beds to do the work of two vehicles. It was very necessary when preparing to transport the beds over the city streets or country roads to pack them into the truck with the greatest care in order to avoid scratching the enamel or other highly polished surfaces during transit, and thus detracting from their value.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0014.xml
article
546
546,547,548,549,550,551
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Solving New York’s Freight Problem
A Submarine Blockade Runner Which Could
How Do You Sit?
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Herbert Francis Sherwood
NATURE has made in New York Harbor the problem of a cheap manner of transferring goods between land and water and the transportation lines and factories, warehouses and stores difficult of solution. This year the complex method evolved for handling freight has been further complicated through the scarcity of ships and the congestion of the railroad terminals in consequence.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0015.xml
article
552
552,553
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Ten Millions to Save Four Miles
Tunneling Through the Canadian Rockies
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IN the Canadian Rocky Mountains is a giant mass of rock, towering 8,540 feet and known as Mount McDonald. It lies on the route of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Between Mount McDonald on the right and Mount Tupper on the left, the road enters what is known as Rogers Pass.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0016.xml
article
554
554
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Bucking a Wooden Football Line
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PUTTING your shoulder to the wheel of opposition and developing strength and power from the struggle is an ethical procedure in the generally accepted meaning of the words. But football players have not only reduced the axiom to practise but have even manufactured a sturdy opponent which is equal in weight and resistance to seven human beings.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0017.xml
article
555
555,556
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The Czar of the Power-House
Sampling the Drinks for an Entire Large City
What Is the Leaning Tower of Pisa Compared with This?
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THE man who controls the outgoing current from a central power-house is a Czar whose domain may cover all territory within a radius of one hundred to five hundred miles of the station. By the mere pushing of a few buttons on his desk he can stop all street-car systems and every interurban railroad.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0018.xml
article
557
557,558,559
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Bathing in Your Trunk
Housekeeping Made Easy
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A COMBINATION trunk, laundry basket and bathtub is the novel invention of Ole C. and Hannah Lee, Ronan, Montana. The trunk is made of sheet metal, enameled inside and outside to adapt it for use as a bathtub or laundry tub, and it is also provided with an outlet at the bottom, to which a hose can readily be attached to draw off the water.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0019.xml
article
560
560,561
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The Wiles of the Automobile Thief
A New Gasoline-Motor-Driven Road Roller
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THERE is a department in the bureau of New York police which does nothing all the year around but round up automobile thieves. When an automobile is stolen, the case is immediately referred to the “Stolen Automobile Squad.” The professional automobile thief has the air and appearance of a polished gentleman.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0020.xml
article
562
562,563,564
[no value]
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A Magician Among the Fishes
The Strange Vegetable of Peru That Resembles a Sheep
Using the Steam Radiator to Remove Wall-Paper
A New Electric Cloth-Cutter for Small Shops
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IT IS doubtless true that there are no mermaids in the sea and no Neptune with crown and flowing locks, but the species of life that do exist there are in many ways equally as interesting as the mythological folk. Take the little puffer fish, for example, which has attracted the attention of scientists from earliest times on account of its shrewd habit of defending itself by inflation.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0021.xml
article
565
565,566,567,568
[no value]
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Dropping to Safety from a Fire
The Electrical Scrub-Woman— Brainless but Efficient
Trundling Your Washing-Machine on Wheels
Small Electric Pump for Draining Seepage from a Cellar
Pumping Up His Interest in Your Wares
Playing Ball with a Revolving Fan as a Target
Where the Linen Collar Started and Who Started It
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SUCCESSFUL experiments were made recently with a new Danish fire-escape at the main fire-station of Charlottenburg, which is a suburb of Berlin. The apparatus comprises a crane which can be swung out of the window, a rope and a brake to regulate the speed of descent.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0022.xml
article
569
569,570,571,572
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Motoring on Roller-Skates
A Danger Signal Which Compels Attention
A Safety-Bicycle for the Timid Fat Man
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IF we had wheels on our feet, something like the wings on Mercury’s heels, would we “get there” much more quickly? Walking is admittedly an energy-consuming method of locomotion. A man’s legs weigh forty or fifty pounds apiece, and the sheer labor of shifting them one ahead of the other means a considerable expenditure of energy.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0023.xml
article
573
573,574,575,576
[no value]
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Removing High Lamp Bulbs
A Six-Mile Trip Through a Sewer on a Motorcycle
Transforming a Beauty Spot Into a Public Utility
Why Isn’t This Used Instead of Hooks and Eyes?
Steam Yourself and Drive Away Your Ills
Hunting Destructive Animals in National Forests
How the Firing of Heavy Guns Affects Animals
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HOW are burnt-out bulbs renewed in large electrically-lighted canopies over the entrances of hotels, theaters and public buildings? Ordinarily a long extension ladder is required. A man holds the foot of the ladder to prevent it from slipping; another climbs it to remove the burnt-out bulbs and insert new ones.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0024.xml
article
577
577
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A Machine-Shop in a Diving-Bell
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A DIVING-BELL in a large steel tank filled with clear water was exhibited in a New York store recently. The tank was fourteen feet in diameter and ten in height. Suspended from a stanchion overhead was an iron sphere about four feet in diameter.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0025.xml
article
578
578,579
[no value]
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A Fleet of Indoor Battleships
Detecting Enemy Submarines from a Ship’s Look-Out
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TO TRAIN its officers and men in fleet evolutions and to teach recruits the nomenclature of a battleship, eight miniature warships have been so constructed by the Second Battalion of the New York Naval Militia that they can perform on an armory floor all the maneuvers of a battle fleet at sea.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0026.xml
article
580
580,581
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Testing an Air-Fighter’s Nerve
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THE war-aviator must be so constituted that the sudden menace of danger, of shells bursting about him, of machine-gun bullets raining upon him will find him calm and collected. He must face a crisis not only with deliberate calm, but with the ability to escape with a whole skin.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0027.xml
article
582
582,583
[no value]
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A Voting Machine for Congress
A Bridge Five and One Half Miles Long
Fanning Yourself with the Rocking-Chair
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FOR nearly a century, inventors, spurred on by the deplorable roll-call system in use, have devised instruments of one sort or another to enable Congress to register its vote in a few minutes instead of in the forty to forty-five minutes which are consumed by the roll-call.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0028.xml
article
584
584,585,586,587
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Flood-Lighting Niagara Falls
Artificial Sunlight to See Niagara by Night
Testing the Lifting Capacity of Balloon Fabric
The Night Eyes of the Coast Artillery
A Peaceful-Looking Hat Which Makes You a Walking Arsenal
Mechanical Lungs for the Protection of the Fire-Fighter
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ILLUMINATING Niagara Falls at night by artificial sunlight is the ambitious scheme now occupying the attention of prominent engineers and the officials of Niagara Falls, New York, who have authorized an expenditure of ten thousand dollars for the project.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0029.xml
article
588
588,589,590,591,592
[no value]
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Our First Armored Car
A Warning to Fishermen
Expending Four Tons of Energy in Playing the ’Cello
Old Dobbin Carries His Umbrella With Him
Cleaning Crown Bottle-Corks in a Portable Hopper
Preventing Ships from Rolling by the Use of Giant Flywheels
The Sidewalk Coaster Becomes an Automobile
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THE first armored car to be constructed under the direction of the Board of Engineers of the United States Army has been inspected at the Sandy Hook proving grounds. The car was designed and built within twenty-seven days. It will no doubt be sent to the Mexican border, to be used in actual operation.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0030.xml
article
593
593,594
[no value]
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For Practical Workers
How to Make an Alcohol Lamp and Blow-Torch from an Oil-Can
Two Good Calking Compounds for Boats
Making Automobile Wheels Track Correctly
Accelerating the Cooling Water Circulation
A Pencil Sharpener with an Adjustable Blade
A Quick Method of Repairing a Broken or Cracked Die
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LAWRENCE V. GREENHAUS
J. J. STURMER
V. W. PAGE
CHRISTIAN NIELSON
THE spout of the can is cut off so that about 2⅛ in. remain above the thread. This portion of the tube is then filled with a wick the same as for the ordinary torch. A piece of brass tubing, bent as shown and soldered to one side of the spout, provides a means of attaching a small rubber tube for a blowpipe.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0031.xml
article
595
595,596,597,598,599,600,601,602,603,604,605,606,607,608,609,610,611,612,613,614,615,616,617,618,619,620
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Equipment for the Home Worker
The Bench
Care of Tools
Chisels and Plane-Irons
Saws
To Make a Combined Drawing Table and Stand
A Spanish Windlass Made from Two Broomsticks
How to Protect the Surface of an Enameled Road-Sign
An Ingenious Attachment for a Door-Lock
Finding Your Bearings at Night Without a Compass
To Make a Sanitary Cap for the Milk Bottle
How to Lighten the Finish on Woodwork
Repairing Worn Wheels of a CarpetSweeper
A Bottle-Stopper Made of Glass and Rubber
Drying Negatives by Heat from a Kerosene Lamp
Making a Scrap-Book Out of Old Ledger Covers
A Thumb-Tack Gage for a Paper-Cutting Board
A Photographic Printing-Box for Use with Electric Current
A Scheme for Keeping Pictures Hanging Straight
Removing and Applying Valve-Stem Guides by Pressure
Quickly Adjustable Automobile Fan-Belt Fasteners
Loading Small Luggage on the Outside of the Car
How Piston-Ring Defects Have Been Overcome
A Simple Tracing Method for Electrical Draftsmen
A Table-Mat That is Both Decorative and Protective
Lightening Automobiles with Aluminum
A Bottle-Stopper Which Controls the Outpour
A Gage Which Tells the Amount of Moisture in Wood
Mending Picture Frames with Laundry Soap
An Easily Made Bathroom Cabinet and Medicine Chest
A Clothes-Rack for Use Indoors and Outdoors
A Blacksmith’s Hand-Blower Made of Wood
Four Good Recipes for Acid-Proof Cements
To Convert a Pair of Shoes into Slippers
Improved Method for Decorative Glass Blowing
What to Do with Small Pieces of Bath Sponge
A Draftsman’s Inkstand Which Will not Overturn
Renovating Nickel Plate with Tinfoil and Solder
Keeping Rats Out of the Corn-Crib
An Easily Constructed Support for a Trap-Door
Adjustable Overshoes to Prevent Horses from Slipping
To Make a Dry Battery Having Lasting Qualities
Insulating the Ground Connection in Radio Work
A Weight and Pulley to Adjust Flexible Lamp Cords
To Lengthen a Shot-Chain on a Pull-Socket
An Easily Made Self-Locking Device for Barn-Doors
Two Types of Inexpensive Depth Gages
Annealing Brass Pipe for Bending
A Watch-Carrier for the Motorcycle Handlebar
Operating the Oil-Pump of an Automobile by Valve Action
How to Make a Mallet from a Piece of Broomstick
Making a Polisher for Table Cutlery from a Piece of Carpet
How to Make Your Watch-Dial Luminous
Some Peculiarities of Different Styles of Eye-Glasses
Benches for Electrical and Mechanical Machinery
Utilizing an Old-Fashioned Flat-iron as an Anvil
Protecting the Gas Range with a Wind-Shield
Easily Attached Shock-Absorber for the Automobile
A Simple Method of Filing Checks and Receipts
The Indian’s Method of Tethering a Horse
Keeping Your Ties in Good Condition
A Canteen Made by a Junior Boy Scout
A Simple Way of Making a Canoe Unsinkable
How to Avoid Excessive Oiling in Automobile Cylinders
A Novel Experiment with a Lamp-Bulb
Prolonging the Usefulness of a Saucepan Cover
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J. H. Constantine
C. H. PATTERSON
E. R. THORTON
C. H. THOMAS
GEORGE H. HALL
G. P. LEHMANN
HARRY WILSON
JENNIE E. McCOY
T. H. LINTHICUM
PAUL R. STRAIN
E. B. WILLIAMS
GALE PINCKNEY
L. E. FETTER
N. S. Mc EWEN
JOHN HOECK
JAMES MULLEN
MRS. JENNIE McCOY
N. G. NEAR
ANY man with a few well selected tools and an ordinary amount of skill can eliminate the expense and trouble of calling in a mechanic every time there is some little house repairing to be done. In selecting an equipment it is not a good plan to buy one of the sets made up in cabinets, as there are generally tools in these that are unnecessary and in some instances of an inferior quality.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0032.xml
article
621
621,622
Wireless Communication
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The Home Electrician
Practical Electrical Hints
Spark-Plugs Tested Without Removal from Cylinders
Converting a Plain Zinc-Gap into an Air Blast Spark-Gap
Tapping Field Telephone Wires with a Pocket Connector
Strengthening the Static Field of an Amplifier
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JOSEPH BRINKER
THE device shown in the accompanying drawing enables motor spark-plugs to be tested without removing them from the cylinders. It consists of a thin slab of non-conducting Bakelized Micarta 3½ in. long, 1½ in. wide and ⅛ in. thick, to one end of which are attached two short pieces of copper wire as shown.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0033.xml
article
623
623,624,625,626
[no value]
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Overcoming Troubles in a 200-Meter Wave Outfit
Removing Old Putty from a Window-Pane with a Hot Iron
More Light on the Occupant of the Dentist’s Chair
A Tool for Fishing Wires Through Small Openings
Magnet-Power of Toy Automobiles for Window Display
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R. H. G. Mathews
H. S. RUCKER
H. B. PEARSON
WHEN the radio law of 1912 went into effect, many of the amateur operators of the United States dismantled their apparatus and gave up experimentation with wireless telegraphy, thinking that a station which complied with that law could not do successful work.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0034.xml
article
627
627,628,629,630,631,632,633,634,635
[no value]
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How to Become a Wireless Operator
II.—Construction of a One-Mile Wireless Transmitter
Transmitting Coil
The Spark-Gap
The Loading Coil
The Aerial
Connecting the Set
Employing Kites to Support an Aerial
A New Spark-Gap for Wireless Telephony
Tracing Initials on Tools with Electricity
A Switch Operated by Pressure on a Footboard
Differences in Time Between New York and Foreign Points
Making a Crystal Detector from Cheap Materials
Saving the Picture Show with a New Rheostat
Wireless Telegraph Stations in the West Indies
A Combination Front and Back Door Alarm-Bell
Insulating and Decorative Enamel for Electro-Magnets
Electric Burner for Making Storage-Battery Connections
To Change a Gas Lamp into an Electric Light
Best Wavelengths for Certain Distances
Lighting an Oil-Stove with an Alarm-Clock on Cold Mornings
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T. M. Lewis
STANLEY Y. BEACH
H. WORTHMANN
JOHN B. RAKOSKI
RAY MAXWELL
F. G. DALY
ARTHUR F. STILSON
IN AN article published last month, directions were given for putting together a little buzzer wireless telegraph set which would operate over a distance of a few hundred feet or even more. This small outfit was sufficient to demonstrate such of the principles of wireless telegraphy as should be known by every student and to send messages from one house to another nearby.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0035.xml
article
636
636,637,638,639,640
[no value]
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What Radio Readers Want to Know
Calculating Wavelengths; Circuits of Audion Amplifier; Helix for Spark-Coil
Umbrella Antenna; Variometer; Loose Coupled Tuner
Photographs of Marconi Apparatus and Books on Radio Topics
Copper-clad Antenna Wire and Thickness of Copper
A Simple Electrical Device for Purifying Water
Converting a Freight Car Into a Wireless Station
A Combined Farm Implement Shed and Machine-Shop
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Q. I. I have a loading coil for an inductively coupled receiving tuner consisting of 625 turns of No. 22 enameled wire wound upon a tube 5¼ in. in diameter, also a secondary loading coil wound with No. 27 enameled wire for a distance of 7 in. on a similar size tube.
PopularScience_19161001_0089_004_0036.xml
article
641
641,642
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To Our Supporters
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When Edward Livingston Youmans founded the Popular Science Monthly in 1872, he had a very clear purpose in mind. “Science is not the mystery of a class,” he put it, “but the common interest of rational human beings.” And so he would tell a contributor:
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