Issue: 19160901

Friday, September 1, 1916
September, 1916
3
True
89
Thursday, December 4, 2014

Articles
cover
323
323
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0001.xml
article
323
323,324,325,326,327
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Torpedoing a Submarine from an Aeroplane
Ferreting Out the Secrets of the Golf Ball
A Metal Disk Supplants the Golfer’s Tee
Golfing by the Clock—A New Idea for Golf Courses
What Golfing Sometimes Does to the Feet
Making Your Head Behave While You Hit the Ball
A Paddleless Canoe Propelled by Feet and Hands
A Machine That Cracks Oil-Bearing Nuts Without Crushing Them
A Substantial Cableway Built from Scrap Material
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BECAUSE an airman flying above the water can sight an underwater craft and detect its approximate depth with the naked eye, inventors have devised a number of bomb-dropping contrivances in an endeavor to make the most of this strategic advantage and place the submarine at the mercy of the aeroplane.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0002.xml
article
328
328,329,330,331,332
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The Senators’ Subway
And It Looks So Small On the Map!
Making the Scallops on Plate Glass
How Heat Is Measured with the Eye
This Automobile Seat Serves as a Waiting Room
New Kind of Lawn Sprinkler
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L. W. Lamm
A NEW monorail car has been put into operation in the subway between the Capitol building and the Senate Office Building, at Washington, D. C. A car of similar construction has been in service up to now, but the old car was slow and seated only twelve persons.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0003.xml
article
333
333,334
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Loading Guns by Pneumatic Tube
Bagging Rivet Heads with a Butterfly Net
Hungarian Nectar Still in Which Rhubarb Brandy is Made
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FROM the days of the Spanish Armada down to the present time guns, big and little, on board men-of-war have been loaded by hand. Ammunition hoists have supplanted the tedious lifting processes of the past, but modern engineering progress seems to have left in the lurch any instrument which would automatically load the gun and thus do away with the human factor.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0004.xml
article
335
335,336,337,338,339,340,341,342,343,344,345,346,347,348,349,350,351
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A One-Eyed Machine Stenographer
Making Artificial Eyes for Blinded Soldiers
A Twelve-Inch Gun of French Make
Britain’s New Idea in Dirigibles
Big Guns and the Havoc They Wreak
Interesting Snap-Shots from Verdun
Along the Line of March of the Various Armies
Sending Ammunition to the Mountain Tops
Nursing the Wounded Chargers
Shells and Guns for Verdun
Even War Has Its Sports
Introducing Law and Order Into Mexico With Motor-Trucks and Ammunition
Our Standing Army’s Enforced Two-Months’ Vacation In Mexico
Bringing Dye Stuffs to America from Germany
Via the Famous Submarine “Deutschland”
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IN the July number of the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY we described a typewriter operated by the human voice. Mr. John B. Flowers, of Brooklyn, N. Y., the inventor, has devised another machine, which is nothing more or less than an “eye-operated typewriter.”
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0005.xml
article
352
352,353,354,355,356,357
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The Paving Blocks of Paris
Washington Monument as a MotionPicture Screen
Economizing Gasoline for Automobiles
A Shim for Adjusting Plain Bearings in Automobiles
Automobile Frills Which Are Making The Pleasure Car and Truck More Efficient
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LIKE many another modern city Paris is paved in part with wooden blocks. The municipal workshop has to supply twenty-five million blocks a year. A large amount of blocks must be kept in stock because the supply of wood is not constant. It was consequently necessary to construct a machine that could turn out the desired amount of paving a year while subject to these interruptions of supply.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0006.xml
article
358
358,359,360,361,362,363
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Fifteen Motor-Trucks in One
When the Horse Tops It Over the Automobile
Shooting the Chutes to Safety in an Explosion
If Your Hand Is Too Small— Stretch It
A Castle Built of Coal to Advertise the Resources of Tennessee
Cutting the Cost of Illuminants byWall Treatment
A Guard for Mooring Ropes to Prevent Rats from Landing
Sorting and Packing Apples by Machinery
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THE FARMER may not be the only commercial man who will appreciate this manifold type of motortruck, since the uses to which it may be put are almost limitless; but the special variations shown in the six accompanying illustrations are particularly adapted to farming.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0007.xml
article
364
364,365
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How Fish Jump 100-Foot Dams
Borrowing the Night Lamps of the Fireflies
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DO you know that fish actually jump one hundred-foot dams in their migrations each spring to the headwaters of the rivers in which they spawn? Of course, this one hundred-foot jump is not made all in one leap, but in a number of short leaps of eight inches each.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0008.xml
article
366
366
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Defyin the Action of Fire
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A LIQUID fire and that water resists and renders the action all inof flammable materials absolutely fire-proof has been perfected in the pharmaceutical laboratories of the University of Iowa. When wood, cloth, or paper are saturated with it and then dried, an insoluble mineral material is left in the cells of the fiber which makes combustion impossible.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0009.xml
article
367
367
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Exterminating Mosquitoes
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NEXT to draining, the best way to abolish mosquito breeding places is to treat the water so as to kill the mosquito larvae and while many substances have been tried for this purpose, nothing has given such good results as petroleum, according to experts of the United States Department of Agriculture.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0010.xml
article
368
368,369,370,371,372,373,374,375
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Raising Parasites to Fight Pests
Why Whiskers Continue to Be in Style for Cats
A Low Water Alarm for Boilers, Which Has No Stuffing Boxes
Locomotive Runs Three Hours on Charge from Boiler Plant
A “Soap” Which Is Not Used for Cleansing
Why You Could Not Get Your Man on the Wire
A Typewriter Made Especially for the One-Armed
Catering to the Feminine Patrons of the Bootblack
Housekeeping Made Easy
Increasing the Decorative Value of Portieres
The Latest Answer to “What Is a Cold?”
Shoes of Esparto Straw Which Outwear Leather
Using the Waste Heat of a Kerosene Lamp
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MANY methods of exterminating injurious insects have been tried, some proving useless and others, while effective, being only temporarily so. Perhaps the most scientific work yet attempted is the cultivation of natural enemies, which in time would annihilate the insects upon which they live.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0011.xml
article
376
376,377
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A Locomotive That Burns Pulverized Coal
The Wastage of Flying Machines In the Great War
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OUR modern locomotives are voracious creatures. To fire one of them—the Twentieth Century Limited, for instance—is a task gradually approaching the superhuman. The only remedy, according to railroad men themselves, lies in the utilization of pulverized coal.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0012.xml
article
378
378
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Keeping Watch on the Chimney
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TO-DAY power-plant owners in Cincinnati are as proud of the clean condition of their stacks as they are of their clean engine and boilerrooms and general interiors. The city of Cincinnati has been waging a relentless warfare against the factory smoke nuisance.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0013.xml
article
379
379
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Feeling the Way
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A NEW clearance car has just been placed in service on the Pennsylvania Railroad lines east of Pittsburgh and Erie. It is being run over every division as rapidly as possible in order to secure correct measurements of the distances from the track to projecting portions of station buildings, tunnels, bridges and other objects.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0014.xml
article
380
380,381
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The Sensitive Brazil Nut
Tethering the Largest of the Super-Dreadnoughts
A Hand-Made Hand-Played Phonograph
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A POD with a diameter of from five to six inches, in a thick, hard woody outer covering, contains the so-called Brazil nut of commerce, from twenty to twenty-four of these seeds being closely packed in one shell. On board the vessels the greatest care is taken of the nuts.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0015.xml
article
382
382,383,384
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Your Meerschaum Pipe
The Floating Vegetable Gardens of Mexico
Fishing in Guiana with the Bow and Arrow
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Felix J. Koch
MEERSCHAUM pipe-making is one of the most interesting processes of the American mid-west. In normal times, the meerschaum comes from abroad. Just now, that export has stopped, and the pipe-makers of Cincinnati get it from others at home—whereever it may be bought.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0016.xml
article
385
385,386,387,388
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The Story of Petroleum
First Stage—Separation into Groups by Distillation
Second Stage—Separation and Finishing of First Groups
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C. W. Stratford
The author is an engineer connected with a great oilrefining company. His article, while it describes the general principles of oil-refining, is intended to explain how lubricating-oil in particular is OBTAINED.-EDITOR. THERE is avast difference between petroleum as it flows from the earth and its derivatives.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0017.xml
article
389
389,390
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Rapid-Fire Guns Save Lives
Carpenter’s Level, Compass, GradeFinder and Periscope Combined
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THE three and six-pounders with which all the sea-going cutters of the service are armed now are used to shoot lines to vessels in distress. For years they had served as nothing more than ornaments on the decks of the cutters; for it never was necessary to use them in the enforcement of customs and navigation laws.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0018.xml
article
391
391
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Railroading with Motor-Trucks
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THE very latest scheme which has been employed for bringing the automobile up to maximum efficiency and usefulness is, as so many other inventions and improvements have been, a result of war times. The Army wanted motor-trucks that could run on railroad tracks, making them of service over the route to Mexico, in places where the railroad tracks make otherwise impassable sandy stretches usable.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0019.xml
article
392
392,393
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The Biggest Coal Ship in the World
A Vessel Built to Carry Coal
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LOOK at the “Milazzo” and watch her unload 14,000 long tons of coal and 4,500 tons of oil, and you say at once: “An American designed her—she is practical.” In truth, there is nothing quite like her in the whole world, as ships go. On the other hand, she was designed not by an American, but by an Italian, Captain Emilio Menada, who has earned a reputation for himself as an inventor of transporting machinery.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0020.xml
article
394
394,395,396
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Mechanical Joys of Coney Island
Staging a Coney Island Zeppelin Raid
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Stephen W. Symons
HALF the people who go to Coney Island and similar pleasure resorts, have but one aim in view—to get their fill of thrill. That being the case, an art which may be called “thrill engineering" has been developed. Strange as it may seem, thrills, to be of any commercial value, must not be really dangerous, but must have a goodly admixture of that popular element “Safety First.”
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0021.xml
article
397
397
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The “Spinning-Wheel”Gun
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THE “spinning-wheel” gun is the newspaper name which has been given an odd engine of destruction. The gun consists of a wheel of aluminum and copper construction, mounted on ball-bearings supported by a suitable frame. Projectiles are placed in pockets in a groove in the rim of the wheel, which is rotated at a high rate of speed by an electric motor to which it is belted.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0022.xml
article
398
398
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Checkers as an Out-Door Sport
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A RECENTLY Lawn Checkers, invented which is game sponsored called by Christy Matthewson, is being popularized at the Prospect Park Tennis Courts, in Brooklyn, N. Y., and tournaments are being arranged by Dr. A. George Goldstein. The game is played on a 12-foot canvas “board” stretched out on the lawn.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0023.xml
article
399
399,400
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Fighting Infantile Paralysis
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NEW YORK CITY has been fighting an epidemic of infantile paralysis. More than two thousand five hundred have contracted the disease and six hundred have died. Health authorities of nation, state and city assisted by eminent specialists in children’s diseases, including Dr. Simon Flexner, head of the Rockefeller Institute, and Dr. Noguchi, the Japanese specialist, have joined forces in fighting the scourge, which, for the last twenty-five years, has baffled the medical profession.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0024.xml
article
401
401,402,403,404,405,406
[no value]
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Staging the Celluloid Thriller
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
Staged at the Bottom of the Ocean
Love-Making at the Bottom of the Sea
Sacrificed to Make a Motion-Picture Holiday
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George F. Worts
GOING to the bottom of the sea for motion-pictures was accomplished for the first time about two years ago by George and Edwin Williamson, brothers who invented and perfected an undersea motion - picture apparatus. Their apparatus for making photographs under water was fully described in these pages at the time.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0025.xml
article
407
407,408,409,410
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An X-Ray Tilting Table
“Shooting” a Photograph with a Pistol-Camera
Cleaning Gloves Economically with Benzine
Good-By to the Pin-Boys in the Bowling-Alley
When Manicuring Nails Is a Dangerous Job
A Garden Tractor Which Does Everything But Mind the Baby
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X-RAY photographs of patients in all possible positions to suit the various conditions with which the physician or surgeon has to deal are made conveniently with a "tube tilt-table," invented by Claude E. Campbell, of Lynn, Massachusetts.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0026.xml
article
411
411,412
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Blowing Concrete Into Place
Motor-Trucks to the Rescue in a Freight Embargo
An Electric Motor-Chair
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A NEW system for conveying concrete to the place where it is to be used employs compressed air and the concrete travels at the rate of fifty feet a second. It is especially applicable for lining tunnels with concrete. The mixing may be done outside the excavation and the concrete conveyed by a pipe line to the point of use.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0027.xml
article
413
413,414,415,416,417
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Rocking Stones and Their Romantic Story
One of the Pranks of the San Francisco Earthquake
Even the Hornets Have New Ideas Sometimes
Rolling, Harrowing and Seeding With One Machine
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IN some of the accompanying photographs are to be seen three different kinds of rocks, perched by Nature one on top of another. How could they have been placed in such positions? They weigh many tons. Millions of years before the coming of the first man on-the earth, the two top detached boulders were gently placed in their present resting places by the hand of a veritable giant—the North American glacier.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0028.xml
article
418
418,419
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Safeguarding the Sand Blaster
Why Not Make Rain Work? A Chance for a Rain Motor
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THE preparation of metal surfaces for a covering of paint has given rise to the extensive use of sand blasting outfits. When these are constructed of sufficient capacity to accommodate large surfaces such as are presented by automobile guards, hoods and bodies, the problem of protecting the workmen presents some difficulties.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0029.xml
article
420
420
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Battle Ball—A New Sport
An Example of Motor-Cycle Dare-Deviltry
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BATTLE BALL is the name given to a sort of first cousin to the popular game of tennis. It is a new outdoor game devised by a resident of Virginia. It is played with a racket of novel construction and cloth-covered rubber balls used in tennis. The racket is circular in form with a wide band across which the woven gut of the racket is stretched.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0030.xml
article
421
421,422,423,424,425
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Getting Ready for the Clay Birds
Selecting a Gun
Testing Your Gun and Your Powder
Learning How to Shoot
How to Handle the Gun
A Modern War Relic
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Edward C. Crossman
ONCE too often we trekked to the place of the flying saucers. The spell of the clay bird is upon us. And so, perforce, we toddle down-town to the mart of the gun sellers and there consider the guns that are suitable for breaking the clay. By the rules of the game our task is a bit simplified.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0031.xml
article
426
426
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Smoothing Sidewalks by Machine
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AN outfit for roughing stone sidewalks has been perfected and placed on the market by an Illinois company. It consists of an aircooled air-compressor driven by a gasoline engine mounted on a light steel truck. The compressor is a vertical, air-cooled, oil-splash lubricated machine connected to the engine by a coupling.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0032.xml
article
427
427,428,429
[no value]
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Secret of a Sun-Parlor Bedroom
The Preeminence of American Inventive Ingenuity
Exploiting the Island of Laysan, in Oceania, for Fertilizer and Eggs, Products of the Albatross
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IN modern apartment buildings a great demand has sprung up for apartments provided with sun-parlors readily convertible, by folding-beds and other convertible furniture, into sleeping porches without such double use being obvious to the ordinary visitor.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0033.xml
article
430
430
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A Six-Wheel Automobile
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A MICHIGAN inventor has worked out a steering mechanism for four wheels of a six-wheel vehicle. His invention is unique in that it embodies no radical changes from existing methods now in use, but rather distributes the applicable use of those methods.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0034.xml
article
431
431,432,433,434,435,436
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Plenty of Room for All Europe
New American Porcelain Utensils a Result of the War
Escaping the Barber’s Fingers
Collapsible Tooth-Brush Case
Keeping the Baby’s Bottle Just Right
A Pipe with a Cleaning Wick
A Detachable Massage Brush
A Mechanical Oyster-Opener
Holding Asparagus in the Can
Adding Dignity to Condensed Milk Cans
Putting Exhaust Gases to Work
Reducing Eye-Strain
Handle and Cover for Milk Bottles
Stopping Trains Automatically
The Reason Why We Have Two Eyes Spaced Apart
Belt Shifter Protects Workmen
Spontaneous Combustion
Fitting Penholders to Crippled Hands
A Fascinating Old Sport in a New Dress
Tracing Magazine Cuts
Measuring Ten Thousandths of an Inch
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THE United States can swallow all of Europe—area, population and all—as will be seen in the accompanying map, which shows in a vivid manner how wide is the expanse of the country we live in. The entire combined computed area of the foreign countries noted on the map and the area of the western United States are very nearly the same.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0035.xml
article
437
437,438
Experimental Electricity
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A Microphonic Amplifier
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Arthur Ellison
THE amplification of radio signals is receiving much attention. For this purpose nothing is superior to the audion amplifier, but the price of this apparatus places it beyond the reach of many amateurs. The microphone amplifier herein described will do remarkable work when properly adjusted, but it must be kept free from vibration.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0036.xml
article
439
439,440,441,442,443,444,445,446,447,448
Experimental Electricity
[no value]
Constructing an Amateur’s Aerial
Details of the Timber
Erecting the Pipe
Handling the Guy-Wires
Bolting the Pipe in Place
The Mast Will Resist Storms
A Convenient Arrangement for Turning on the Hall Light
Guying the Mast
Wiring the Ford Automobile for Magneto and Battery
A Simple Way to Construct a TenAmpere Shunt
Controlling Temperature and Humidity at the Same Time
Electric Substitute for the OldFashioned Latchkey
A New Tuner Arrangement
Lepel Improves His System
Making an Induction Coil
Magnet Winder
Utilizing Broken Marble Pieces
Dry Cells and Their Voltage
How to Rid Your Yard of Cats
To Stop the Milk Thief
A New Variable Condenser
The Quenched Gap
A Kickback Preventer
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[no value]
K. B. Warner
E. F. AYRES
S. D. BATES
WILBUR SEIPEL
EDWIN L. POWELL
P. J. MCCLUTE
E. C. MEILLORET
ALEXANDER BOLLERER
ED. GETTINS
MATT JAROSZ
ROBERT KENNEDY
THE construction of amateur radio apparatus has been very fully covered in the past few years, but there is a noticeable dearth of data concerning the erection of amateur masts. Fortunate, indeed, is the amateur who is located so that a mere “2 x 4” on house or barn will furnish a pole of good height.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0037.xml
article
449
449,450,451,452
Experimental Electricity
[no value]
How to Become a Wireless Operator
I.—Why Wireless is Interesting
Elementary Principles
A Simple Transmitter
A Microphone Receiver
Operation of the Apparatus
A Rotary Adjustment for Coupling
A Curious Form of Dustproof Detector Cup
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T. M. Lewis
NOBODY knows just how many amateur wireless operators and experimenters there are in the United States; the total number has been estimated as somewhere between twenty thousand and fifty thousand. Nearly ten thousand licenses for amateur stations have been issued by the Department of Commerce.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0038.xml
article
453
453,454
Experimental Electricity
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What Radio Readers Want to Know
Announcement
A Simple Wireless Telephone
Receiving Long Waves
Sending on Short Wave
Receiving Long Waves
The Construction of Variometer Windings in Single Layers and in Multi-Layers
Requirements of Fire Underwriters Concerning Radio Installations
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Beginning with this issue, the Editors are extending the scope of the Questions and Answers Department so as to include a Radio Readers' Service Bureau. Answers to any questions you wish to ask us will be sent by mail directly to you. Queries of general interest, with their answers, will be published monthly in these pages.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0039.xml
article
455
455
Experimental Electricity
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The Trench Marble Game and How It is Played.
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AN exceedingly interesting marble game can be played by using the trench system of laterals. The device is mounted on a board 9" x 20", preferably of soft pine, an inch thick. This has strips on one end and along the two sides which project an inch above the surface of the board.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0040.xml
article
456
456,457,458,459
Experimental Electricity
[no value]
Iceless Cooker and Refrigerator
A Typewriter Desk Made from a Kitchen Table
A Simple and Convenient Receptacle for Matches
A Home-Made Fire Extinguisher
A Towel Holder
The Strap as a Jar Opener
A Convenient Shoe-Rack
How to Calculate Distances
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DEPENDING upon the heat of the sun to reduce the temperature within a cooler or refrigerator may seem anomalous, but it has been proven scientifically to be possible. The warm summer days bring into prominence the important question of preserving food and keeping on hand a supply of cool water.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0041.xml
article
460
460,461,462
Experimental Electricity
[no value]
Photographic Self Help
Pendulum for the Dark-Room
An Improvised Reflecting-Camera
Novel Device for Copying Pictures
Home-Made Camera Shutter
A Useful Trimming Board
Simple Test of Shutter Speed
An Improved Vacuum Bottle
Facilitates Boiling Water
Using Waterproof Lutes
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A SMALL weight fastened to a thread measuring 9¾" in length and having a loop at the end to be hung from a hook in the edge of a shelf, makes a capital aid in counting seconds for timing the appearance of the image in the time system of development.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0042.xml
article
463
463,464,465
For Practical Workers
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Boring Cylinders with a Lathe
How to Safeguard Mail Against Meddlers
A Substantial Home-Made Jack
A Case for Miniature Lamps
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JOHN B. MAYNARD
THE average automobile repair man does not have a very extensive machine shop outfit, yet he is often called upon to do repair work of considerable magnitude with very ordinary equipment. After automobile engine cylinders have been in use for a time, the cylinder bore is apt to be worn or scored from a wrist-pin loosening.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0043.xml
article
466
466,467,468
For Practical Workers
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Making a Wood-Turning Lathe
A Bottle Pocket Lamp
An Easily Constructed Holder for the Broom
A Weed Destroyer from a Spoon and Broom-Handle
Correcting Pliers Which Bind
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J. S. ZERBE
A. V. BOLLERER
HENRY C. FRANKE
F. H. LINTHIUM
GEORGE NIEDERHOFF
IN the corner was an old kitchen table. That was the only thing handy to be used as the framework in making a wood-turning lathe. A block of spruce 2 ins. thick, 3 ins. wide, and 15 ins. long was first prepared. This had one end thinned down for a distance of 6 ins., and the other end treated in like manner 4 ins. to a shoulder, thus leaving a part 2 ins. thick in the middle portion, through which was bored a cross hole with a three-eighth bit, 3 ins. from the shoulder.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0044.xml
article
469
469,470,471,472,473
For Practical Workers
[no value]
A Child’s Morris Chair
BILL OF MATERIALS
An Efficient Tin Pump
Scale Reading Calipers
Soldering Iron for Light Work
Making a Driving-Box Lifter
Guide Lines for Lettering
Getting a Line on Biddy
Boiling Water by Cooling It
To Find Your Depth
Cheap Photographic Changing Box
An Automatic Faucet for Tanks
[no value]
[no value]
ANTON BUCHBINDER
R. L. KENYON
JOSEPH K. LONG
W. H. SCHEER
E. P. THORNTON
H. J. GRAY
F. A. WILHELM
THE drawing and illustrations are for a Morris chair suitable for a child from six to twelve years of age. A number of them have been successfully made in the eighth grade of New York City schools. With slight changes in the dimensions, such as one inch added to the length of the legs, and an inch wider and deeper, the chair fits a boy or girl from twelve to fifteen years of age.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0045.xml
article
474
474,475
For Practical Workers
[no value]
The Use of Jigs and Fixtures
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
S. H. Samuels
THE average person conceives of “tools” as drills, taps, reamers, etc., but modern automatic machinery has necessitated the use of jigs and fixtures for reproduction work. In jigs and fixtures would be unpractical and extravagant. When large quantities are to be produced and sent upon the market, however, the results are surprising.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0046.xml
article
476
476,477,478
For Practical Workers
[no value]
A Portable Colony Poultry House
How to Drill Holes Quickly in Wood
A Screen Door-Check
Cooling a Ship’s Laundry
Making a Plate-Glass Drill
Coloring of Copper
A Handy Spacing Scheme
[no value]
[no value]
W. E. Frudden
WALTER FRANSEEN
E. P. THORNTON
A. and P. THOMPSON
JOHN HAVEKOST
N. G. NEAR
THIS is a simply built poultry house that will accommodate 30 full-grown birds and the lumber and the roofing matetial that covers the whole house all told, will not cost over $30. It is 8 by 10 ft. in size. Runners or skids furnish a foundation for the house.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0047.xml
article
479
479,480
For Practical Workers
[no value]
A Cozy Southern Farmhouse
To Improve Machinist’s Cement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER extensive surveys in the South to determine the household needs of families with reference to local agriculture, climate, and domestic help, the Office of Public Roads and Rural Engineering of the Department of Agriculture has developed a plan for a southern farmhouse which meets all the requirements of a small family.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0048.xml
article
481
481,482
For Practical Workers
[no value]
Money Prizes for Motorcyclists
Send Us Your Kinks
Even Though You Don’t Win a Prize It’s Worth While
Here’s What We Want
Follow These Rules
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you are a motorcyclist, if you have devised simple ways of making repairs, if you have improved your machine in any way, this will interest you. The POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY offers a first prize of $25, a second prize of $15 and a third prize of $10 for articles in which motorcyclists will describe and illustrate the methods which they have successfully employed for overcoming trouble, for making quick repairs by the roadside or more difficult repairs in the shop, or for making attachments whereby the use of the motorcycle has been broadened.
PopularScience_19160901_0089_003_0049.xml