Issue: 19160701

Saturday, July 1, 1916
July, 1916
1
True
89
Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Articles
cover
3
3
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0001.xml
article
3
3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11
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The Mine That Hears
Automobile Scale-Demonstrator
Government Guide-Posts Give Detailed Information
End-Door Automobile Express Cars
When the “Guns” of Peace
Turn Upon an Exposition City
The Transit of Exposition Glories
Reducing an Exposition to Dust
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Edward F. Chandler
EVERY one knows that in time of war harbors are protected by mines through which an enemy cannot easily pass without the risk of destroying himself. Depending on their nature the mines are called “contact” or “shorecontrolled.” As the names indicate, the contact mine explodes as soon as a trigger with which it is provided is actuated by a ship, or a bottle of acid is spilled on a suitable chemical; the shore-controlled mine is exploded electrically from a station at the critical moment determined by observation.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0002.xml
article
12
12,13
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Doing Without the Caddy
Golfing at Home
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A NEW mechanical caddy for the golfer has been invented by John Deere Cady of Moline, Illinois. It is an ingenious, wheeled holder for golf-sticks, which the player can easily take over the golf course without the assistance of a caddy. Indeed, the caddy can be entirely forgotten, unless the player loses one of his golf balls, when he can call the caddy to his assistance and make him an offer to find the lost ball.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0003.xml
article
14
14,15,16,17
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A Duck-Boat as an Automobile Top
A Measuring Machine More Sensitive Than a Human Being
Lighting the Inside of an Oven
A Mechanical Whip
Welding Soft Metal to Hard
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NOVEL camping outfits have, from time to time, been introduced, but it is doubtful if anything more daring and ingenious has been conceived than an automobile with a duck-boat for a top, the invention of G. W. Clark of Glendale, California.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0004.xml
article
18
18,19
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Protecting a Battleship with a Belt of Air
An Instrument for Plucking Flowers
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READ the accounts of the battles fought off Heligoland and the Falkland Islands, in which ships protected by heavy side armor were sunk by gun fire at ranges of five miles and the question must occur: What is the good of armor? If twelve and more inches of steel can be penetrated by the fifteen-inch guns of a British battle-cruiser at distances of miles it would seem as if victory in sea engagements is a matter of hitting power rather than of protection.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0005.xml
article
20
20,21
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What X-Rays Can Do for Your Teeth
How Sea Caves Are Made
A Lamb with Two Coats of Wool
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THE purchasing agent of a large corporation took a night train from Buffalo for Pittsburgh. It was cold and the next morning his face was fairly alive with pain. He concluded that neuralgia had singled him out as a victim. Consultation with a physician resulted in about the same opinion.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0006.xml
article
22
22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,48
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Yachting in the Air
Why Ballooning Will Never Die
How Balloons Are Made
How the Balloon is Inflated
The Start of an Ascension
Driving Railway Spikes with a Motor-Car
Portable Electric Tire-Inflator
Keeping Things Cold in the Automobile Refrigerator
A Record Motor-Truck Load of Barrels
How One Ford Got Up in the World
A “Shoo-Fly” For a Candy Kitchen
A Ticklish Moment
A Protecting Holder for an Open-Faced Watch
Hearing Your Men at Work
Interchangeable Pressing and Steaming Device for Tailors
“Ironing Out” Earthquake Wrinkles in San Francisco
How Automobiles Innocently Break Windows
There’s more to War than Shot and Shell
Refinements in War Motors
The David and the Goliath of the Skies
A Gas Attack Seen from an Aeroplane
New Activities of Military Surgeons
Keeping the Germans from Verdun
What the Battle of Verdun Means to the Townspeople
From the World’s Greatest Battle-Ground
Glimpses of the French Trenches
“Somewhere in France”
The War in the Clouds
Rapid-Fire Guns and Their Victim
Overcoming Difficulties in Albania
On the High Seas with the Battleships
America’s Monument to Her Policy of Unpreparedness
Hairpin Curves on a Mountain Trolley Line
How an Automobile-Engine Tests Water-Mains
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Carl Dienstbach
THIS seems to be the proper moment to realize how completely the term “aeronaut” has changed its century-old meaning. Until recently only the balloonist might still claim to be a true aeronaut, fearless of the elements, starting anywhere, rising to extreme altitudes and traveling long and far, while the average aviator was confined to his “flying grounds.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0007.xml
article
49
49,50,51,52,53
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Your Mainsail and the Wind
An Inverted Steam-Hammer for Drawing Piles
Six Battleships Go Into Reserve
When the Fighting Man Dreams
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AN interesting and practical series of experiments in a field that is new to science has been made at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology by Professor H. A. Everett, for the purpose of determining some of the facts about the propelling power of sails.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0008.xml
article
54
54,55,56,57,58,59,60
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Saving Hours in Handling New York Subway Dirt
A Workshop on Every Farm
A Flower-Bed on Top of a Rock
A Unique Garden-Hose Holder
Playing Baseball by Machine
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DOING in five minutes the same work that formerly took twenty-five minutes to perform, the method of handling rock from subway excavations illustrated herewith is one of the most effective systems ever devised. It is in use at three points along the subway route in New York city.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0009.xml
article
61
61,62,63,64
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An Excavator Which Walks
Nations Bleed in Peace as Well as in War
Fighting Timber Fires
Conelike Flower-Holder in a Brick Wall
The Official City Fly-Catcher of Redlands, California
The Five-Wheeled Velocipede
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A BIG excavating machine which literally walks to its job is being used by the United States Government on one of the great irrigation projects of the Southwest, and the advantages of this pedestrian accomplishment are many. Most of the machines of this character are built to roll over the ground on wheels, but its movements are necessarily limited, for it dare go only where the ground has been carefully prepared for it.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0010.xml
article
65
65,66,67,68,69,70,71
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The Marvelous Voice Typewriter
Talk to It and It Writes
How the Voice Typewriter Works
Experimenting with the Phonoscribe
Speech Had First to Be Studied
Why Whispers Were Studied
What the Word “Boat” Looks Like in Air Waves
Splitting Up a Spoken Word for the Voice Typewriter
The Feminine Gender of Preparedness
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Lloyd Darling
CONCEIVE an ordinary machine resembling the machines in common office use—full of the customary cog-wheels and crooked levers and variegated springs. It might be an adding machine so far as one can judge by external appearances or a dictaphone or a newfangled cash-register.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0011.xml
article
72
72,73,74
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What Make of Car Is It?
Preparedness Against Bank Burglars
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Prescott Lecky
HAS your car a Roman nose, or is it pug? Do its ears stand out or lop over? Its eyes —are they far apart or close together, deepset, large, high or low? This is by no means nonsense. It is the method of automobile identification now being taught the two hundred and fifty policemen who guard the outlets of New York city, such as ferries, bridges and main roads.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0012.xml
article
75
75,76
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What’s Wrong with Big Aeroplanes
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Carl Dienstbach
WHEN Curtiss built the “America” for an intended flight across the Atlantic, he was compelled to design a big machine. The radius of action could be extended only by providing for much fuel. Fuel became the most important freight of the bigger machine.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0013.xml
article
77
77,78,79,80,81,82,83,84,85
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As Easily Handled as a Rifle
A Revolutionary Motion Picture Camera
Details of a Remarkable Motion-Picture Camera
The Film Cutter
Eliminating Friction of the Film
Carl Akeley’s Wonderful Invention
Getting Rid of the Flicker
Seeing the Image
How the Shutter Works
The Finger Talk of Chicago’s Wheat-Pit
Experimenting with the Siphon
Forty Miles an Hour on the Water
What Ho! The Jitney Yacht
New York is the World’s Luxury Market
What Can Be Done with a Ford Chassis
The Newest Ideas in Motor-Trucks
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Charles W. Person
CARL E. AKELEY of the American Museum of Natural History has evolved a motion-picture camera so novel in its constructional and operaating features that it gives promise of revolutionizing at least one of the diversified fields of motion-picture photography—that of the naturalist and big game hunter.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0014.xml
article
86
86,87,88
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Beautifying Manhattan’s Riverfront
Electrifying the Clam-Shell Bucket
Dipping Elk to Rid Them of Ticks
Ostrich Squab: A New Delicacy
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THE one blot on the beauty of Riverside Drive in New York city has been the tracks of the New York Central, running along the west side of Manhattan Island. For years vigorous protests have been raised against the nuisance, one newspaper referring to the railroad’s right-of-way as “Death Avenue.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0015.xml
article
89
89,90,91,92,93,94
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Seeing the Unseen
Looking at Things with Invisible Light
Filling Trenches by Machine
The Amazing Beetle
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R. W. Wood
IF you could strike all the keys of a piano at once, from the deepest base note to the topmost treble, you would create a medley or cacophony in which it would be impossible to pick out one sound from another. White light is very much like that.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0016.xml
article
95
95,96,97
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Insect Carpenters and Masons
Selling Cars Under the "Big Top"
Electric Plant Run by an Artesian Well
Air-Propeller Drives Bicycle
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Edward F. Bigelow
THE young naturalist who lies face downward at the brookside, and with shaded eyes watches the busy life that there has its being, will see, in many places, little masses of small stones or bundles of small sticks, moving on the bottom of quiet pools as though they were alive.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0017.xml
article
98
98,99,100,101
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Making Water Pump Itself
A “Jackomobile” for Two
The Milk-Can Trolley
Straw Raincoats of Japan
What? Only Three Kinds of Feet?
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DOES water seek its own level? Yes, with an if—if the water is the same density throughout. If the density of water in two connecting vessels differs, the level of the lighter water will be higher. There are different ways in which density can be affected.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0018.xml
article
102
102,103,104,105,106,107
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Photography in Natural Colors
Two Plates Are Used with the Camera
Why Two Colors Must Be Employed
How a Steamer’s Engine-Room Is Ventilated
What Inventors Are Doing for the Fisherman
A Watch-Like Coin-Case
Mosquitoes on Snow Banks
An Improved Vegetable-Slicer
Fish Hatched in Artesian Basin
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Lloyd Darling
COLOR photography is not new. It has been the goal of ambitious inventors ever since scientists really understood something of the nature of light. Nearly all methods of making colored photographs are long and expensive. Though beautiful results were in some cases secured, only an able scientist could manipulate the apparatus, time the exposures, and keep track of the dozens of little things all-essential to securing satisfactory results.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0019.xml
article
108
108,109,110,111
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How Indians Graduate from Carlisle
Chickens Feed Themselves On The Run
Housekeeping Made Easy
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AGAYLY decorated platform on which are seated the graduates, faculty, speaker and other invited guests; a lengthy program of music, orations and addresses, probably all cut to order and sugar-coated for the occasion; an award of sheepskins and a benediction—this, in brief, constitutes the stereotyped graduation ceremony of most colleges and schools.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0020.xml
article
112
112
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How to Run a Motor-Boat
Prize Winners of Sam Loyd’s Puzzles
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WHEN starting the motor, close any auxiliary air valves and hold the hand over the air inlet of the carburetor so as to draw in a richer mixture, otherwise the mixture may be too weak to start the motor. If the mixture seems to be rich enough, the engine may start off if a little lubricating oil is let into the cylinder which will make the compression better.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0021.xml
article
113
113,114
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Little Inventions to Make Life Easy
Why Weren’t They Thought of Before?
A New Way of Directing the Breeze of a Fan
Handling the Cord of Electric Irons
A Salt-Shaker Which Will Not Clog
At Last! A Lock For Slipping Rubbers
Adjustable Kettle-Cover
Hammer for One-Armed Man
Semaphore Signals for Automobiles
An Adjustable Golf-Tee Board
Combined Penholder and Blotter
Saw Cuts Square Hole
Skinning the Slippery Eel
Why Fall Down in Your Bath-Tub?
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A FAN motor is enclosed in a spherical shell, so that no moving parts are visible. The current of air generated by the fan is directed through a nozzle which is covered by a wire mesh as a protective measure. The air is forced out in a parallel current, and blown in any desired direction.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0022.xml
article
115
115,116
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Camp Fire Maxims
To Start a Fire in Wet Weather
To Carry Fire on a Boat
To Bake Fish
Using Gates to Lessen Danger from Truck-Trailers
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H. S. Rinker
CLEAR a place for the fire, so that it cannot spread. One of the best ways is to dig a ring around it, so that damp earth interrupts the dry grass or dead leaves which may be present. See that the flame will not scorch trees. Never throw away a match—not even a burnt one or a wet one.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0023.xml
article
117
117,118,119,120,121,122
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For Practical Workers
How to Make an Efficient Boiler-Patch
An Easily Made Mercurial Barometer
Killing Vermin with Gas
A Wallpaper Remover
A Non-Spillable Funnel
A Dark-Room Lamp
A Handy One-Drop Oiler
Rubbing in the Lathe
An All-Steel Screwdriver
A Buck-Saw Attachment
How to Etch Glass
Bonding Joists to Brick Walls
Emergency Control of Motor
A Drainage Kink
A Screwdriver Handle
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THE usual method of patching a boiler cannot be relied upon for high efficiency. Suppose there is need of a patch at the check-valve hole of a locomotive-boiler. The radial cracks, most often along the length of the plate, start out from the hole.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0024.xml
article
123
123,124,125,126
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Automobile Shop Repairs
Replacing Automobile Piston-Rings
Steam as a Carbon Remover
A Gasoline Tank Gage
Lapping a Scored Automobile Engine Cylinder
A Handy Hook for the Automobilist
Simple Cure for Misfiring at Low Engine Speeds
One Geared Motor Serves Two Drives
A Pocket-Clip for Pencils
Building an Oil Reservoir
Emptying a Bottle
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WHEN replacing the piston in the cylinder of a gasoline engine, after it has been taken apart, it is usually difficult to get the compressionrings to enter the bore because they have to be sprung shut one at a time in order to slide in. A new device has been designed to obviate this difficulty.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0025.xml
article
127
127,128,129,130
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Kite Making at Home—II
How to Build and Fly the Blue Hill Box, Malay Box Combination and Tetrahedral Cell Kites
The Malay Box Combination
The Tetrahedral Cell
A Few Words About Flying
An Emergency Fountain-Pen
Making a Two-Fuse Switchblock
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H. S. Rinker
HAVING progressed thus far, variety can be introduced by making some Blue Hill box-kites. These are named after the Blue Hill Weather Observatory, Massachusetts, where they were originated. They look like Fig. 16. Make 4 sticks ½ in. square, but otherwise proceed as described for the Malay kite.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0026.xml
article
131
131,132,133,134,135,136,137,138,139,140,141,142,143,144
Experimental Electricity
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The Construction of an Improved High-Tension Audion Battery
Rejuvenating Electric Lamps
An Exciter for Electroscopes
A Wet Battery From a Dry One
Interference of Lighting Circuit by Static Electricity
How to Photograph Wild Animals
Converting a Key-socket Into a Simple Pull-socket
Electric Striking Mechanism for Mission Clocks
A Simple Anchor-Gap
Making a Mechanical Interrupter
Temporary Variable Condenser
A Delicate Crystal Detector
Radio in the Far South
A Lead-in Connector
An Unusual Code Letter
Mounting a Rotary-Gap
Greater Speed in Wireless Receiving
Receiving Undamped Oscillations
An Electrically Operated Device for Lighting Gas
A Model Electrical Hammer
Compact Condensers
How to Make an Attachment-Plug
How to Make an Electric Shaving-Mug
Using Cartridge Shells for Electrical Contacts
The Best Crystal Detectors
Testing Electric Lamps Quickly
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Charles Horton
IN the early days when the audion as a detector was used only to a limited extent, it was generally considered that on account of the extremely high resistance of the path through the telephones and across the vacuum in the bulb, the high-tension battery used to supply this circuit must be good for many years’ work.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0027.xml
article
145
145,146
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What Radio Readers Want to Know
When Is the Transmitter in Good Condition?
Receiving 3,000 Miles
Flickering of Lights
Windings for Receiving-Tuner
Detailed Dimensions of a 3,000-Meter Tuner
Small Power-Transmitter
Receiving Aerial
Long Wave Receiving Tuner
Licensing of Sending Stations
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The information you request concerning the operation of wireless telegraph equipment is mainly covered in the various textbooks of wireless telegraphy, but not specifically taken up in any particular one. The necessary tests for determining the condition of radio telegraphic apparatus are so well understood by those engaged in the work that the authors have neglected to take up this phase of the subject.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0028.xml
article
147
147,148
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The Home Workbench
Making a Washing-Machine From a Barrel
A Package Tie Made of Tape
Making a Lawn Chair
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A VERY serviceable washing-machine can be made from an old barrel-churn whose capacity is from fifteen to twenty-five gallons. First construct, of heavy galvanized-iron, a cylinder about 30 ins. long and of the same diameter as the head of the churn.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0029.xml
article
149
149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157
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How to Make a Sewing-Screen
WOOD FOR FRAME
LEATHER FOR COVERING
Fitting Windows With Weights
How to Remove Iodine Stains
Building a Poultry-House with a Skylight
Some Curtain Suggestions
How to Pack Mirrors to Prevent Breaking
A Clothes-Line Prop That Will Not Drop or Slip
This prop is stable yet detachable
A Hoop with a Guiding Hub
Wood Blocks for Flooring
Finding the Right-Sized Nail
Improving a Kitchen Knife
An Improved Roller-Towel
Let Your Ice-Cream Freeze While Motoring
To Screen Doors and Windows
A Home-Made Table-Ton Varnish
Concealed Ventilation
Removing Heat Spots from a Table
A Merry-Go-Round Swing
How to Make a Practical Gas-Range Lighter
Making the Cellarway Serve Two Purposes
For Cleaning Leather Upholstery
How to Make a Door-Mat from Old Rope-Ends
A Back-Saving Refrigerator
Renovating the Lawn
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INSTEAD of a workbasket, with spools of thread, buttons, scissors, embroidery, hoops, etc., all crowded into a small space, a screen can be used, which has a definite place for every article used in sewing. The spools of thread are kept on brass pegs; the silks in one place and the cottons in another.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0030.xml
article
158
158
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Weightmobile Approaches Perpetual Motion
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A VEHICLE body mounted on springs has a constant vertical movement, the amplitude of the motion being dependent on two things: first, the speed of the vehicle, and, second, the inequalities of the road. The weightmobile is a piece of mechanism designed to convert oscillations into a continuous rectilinear movement, and thus greatly assist in propelling any moving body on wheels.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0031.xml
article
159
159,160
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Trend of Motor-Truck Design Toward Worm Drive
Measuring Rainfall on the Farm
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MORE than sixty per cent of the American motor-trucks listed on the market at the present time are worm-driven. Last year twenty-two per cent of the trucks listed were wormdriven, thus showing that the popularity of this form of drive has increased.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0032.xml
article
161
161,162
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We Paid Six Dollars
For These Two Pictures
But, Let the Picture Be Alive
Things You Can Do with an Automobile
Queer Ways of Making a Living
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OF course you recognize Delia, the motor duck, which appeared in our March issue. We want more photographs of equally interesting inventions, and we will pay for them at the rate of $3.00 each. The more daring the invention, the better for us.
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0033.xml