Issue: 19160601

Thursday, June 1, 1916
June 1916
6
True
88
Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Articles
cover
803
803
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0001.xml
article
803
803,804
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Undersea Fighting of the Future
I.—Mobilizing Submarines on Rails
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Simon Lake
I FIRMLY believe the destiny of the submarine is to stop all future maritime wars between countries. A tremendous power for destruction, the submarine is in itself useless for purposes of invasion. The moment the submarine becomes visible it becomes vulnerable.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0002.xml
article
805
805,806,807,808,809
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Undersea Fighting of the Future
II.—Battling with Telephones
Why the Submarine Is Crude
Seeing Sounds on a Dial
Under Water Echoes and How They Are Applied
Artificial Senses Take the Place of Eyes and Ears
A Sewer Banquet at $25 a Plate
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Edward F. Chandler
IF the war has taught us anything it has taught us that the submarine must be reckoned with both as an annihilator of battleships and as a destroyer of commerce. Of the dozens of instrumentalities invented for killing on a wholesale scale it is the most terrible.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0003.xml
article
810
810,811,812,813,814
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Hanging a Defective Boiler Plug as a Warning
An Ingenious Combined Lawn-Mower and Roller
An Egg With Hour Ridges
Freezing Cocoanuts to Get at the Milk
London War Affects Baby Carriages
How War Mobilizes the Non-Combatant
Adjustable Footrest
Floor Scrubber Propels Itself
Curved Spring Device Returns Bowling Balls
Detachable Blades for Hatchets
Listening to an Electric Current
Rock Folded Like Cardboard
The House That Tin Cans Built
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A MINIATURE gallows from which hangs a defective fusible plug responsible for a boiler explosion which occurred on board the steamship Jefferson, near Norfolk, Va., on May II, 1914, is one of the interesting curios on the walls of the office of Secretary Redfield, of the Department of Commerce in Washington.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0004.xml
article
815
815,816,817,818,819,820
[no value]
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Giant Press Used in Making Shrapnel Shells
A Switchman Who Became Judge, Though Armless
Why We Can See Through Water
A New Type of Motor Horse-Ambulance
Germany’s Rubber Trade
The Longest Wagon-Bridge in the World
Healing Magic of the Electric Arc
Watch Your Oil for Gold Teeth
Protecting a Bridge from Villa with Acetylene Lamps
The Gentlest Bullet
Swimming by Searchlight
A Strange Persian Cistern
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IN the manufacture of brass cartridge cases for shrapnel or high-explosive shells, fifteen to twenty operations are required before the case is completed. Starting with a brass disk or blank, a number of cupping, drawing and indenting operations are performed before the case is ready for the heading operation.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0005.xml
article
821
821,822,823
[no value]
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Housekeeping Made Easy
How to Avoid Burnt Fingers
Cherry-Stoner Saves the Hands
An Electric Gas-Lighter
Efficiency in the Kitchen
Two Cooking Vessels in One
A Glue-Brush Like a Fountain-Pen
A Vacuum Washing-Machine Which Sucks Dirt Out of Fabrics
Try These
A Convenient Milk and Butter Slide for Refrigerators
An Ice-Grip With Many Uses
Another Way to Rejuvenate Eggs
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WHERE is the cook who has never burnt her hands draining scalding hot water from vegetables? Blistered hands may now become mere reminiscences, for there are upon the market excellent vegetable kettles of aluminum with lids held in place safely by clamps.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0006.xml
article
824
824,825,826,827,828,829
[no value]
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Measuring the Light of the Stars
Professor of Astronomy in the University of Illinois
Wanted: A Standard Eye
The Selenium Cell Is Packed in Ice
The Stars in Orion
Measuring Cloth in the Roll
A Marvelous War Map
A Successful Railroad
A New Way of Loading Steamers from Freight Cars
Bad Roads Make Bad Going
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Joel Stebbins
ONE of the standard problems of astronomy is the exact determination of the amount of light that comes from each of the stars. Not that the knowledge of the fraction of a candle power of each star is of any interest or importance, but that the measures are valuable for future reference, especially to determine the gradual changes in light caused by the dying out or the brightening of these distant objects.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0007.xml
article
830
830,831,832,833,834,835,836,837,838,839,840,841,842,843,844,845,846,847,848,849,850,851,852
[no value]
[no value]
Trench-Digging by Machinery
Traveling by Parcel Post
Moving Furniture with a Motorcycle
Locating a Thunderstorm
Stores on Wheels
Water Rises to Three Hundred Feet in New York Sky Scrapers
War and Trade
What a Lot of Machinery to Chase Villa!
Tracking Villa in the Wilds of Mexico
We Wonder If Villa Has These Conveniences
Our Punitive Expedition Into Mexico
Things the Recruiting Office Never Mentions
Does This Mark the Beginning of a New Labor Era?
The Modern Orderly Rides Not on a Snorting Horse But on a Swift Motor-Cycle
Nothing Is Unusual in Europe Now
Repairing the Human Wrecks of War
Like Other Countries Germany Did Not
Take Kindly to Its First Submarine
French Life Along the Western Battle Front
Behind the Scenes of the War
Making and Using the Booming Guns
How a Zeppelin Raider Appears to Englishmen
Straw Hat Insurance
A Buzz-Saw Safety Razor
Fooling the Pickpocket
A Tray to Hide Unsightly Cigar Ashes
These Desert Mates Never Quarrel
This Gold Dredge Is a Glutton
Two New Colossal Bridges
A Device for Numbering Photographic Plates and Films
Submitting Photographs for the London Exhibition
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MODERN engineering requirements coupled with a persistent demand for labor-saving devices have brought into being several types of trench-digging apparatus which are of ingenious construction. Of all manual labor, digging trenches by hand or excavating on a large scale by hand is the most laborious and expensive method.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0008.xml
article
853
853,854,855,856,857
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Why Does a Rifle Crack?
Straightening a Baby Llama’s Knock-Knees
Vegetation that Thrives Where Water Is Scarce
A New Powerful Farm-Tractor
Killing Insects with Poisonous Gas
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Edward C. Crossman
A WAR strength infantry company lay in our rear. We walked toward its far-off target, nearly in the line the bullets would take, a few yards’ divergence to the left giving us the safety margin we felt would be enough with such expert marksmen.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0009.xml
article
858
858,859,860,861,862,863
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Niagara’s New Air Route
Diplomacy and Engineering
Suppose a Cable Should Snap?
Some Interesting Safety Devices
Inventions for the Navy
Drying Cattle Hides in a Broiling Tropical Sun
A Whipping Machine to Cure Nervousness
An Electric Iron With a Headlight
How Record-Breaking Girders Were Handled
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Charles W. Person
TO be suspended in mid-air over the vortex of the boiling, swirling Whirlpool Rapids at Niagara Falls, Ontario, with an unintercepted view of the rapids on one side and of Niagara Glen and the lower river on the other, is a dream which Spanish engineers, backed by Spanish capital and patents, have realized.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0010.xml
article
864
864,865,866,867,868,869,870
[no value]
[no value]
A New Era in Water Power Begun at the Henry Ford Farms
Sterilizing Water by Ultra Violet Light
What Blood Pressure Means and How It Is Measured
A Clean Way of Removing Pens from Their Holders
A Summer-House from Straw Bottle-Casings
A Water-Wagon in Actual Use
Learning Arithmetic With a Woman’s Invention
Austria Exhibits Paper Substitutes for Cloth
An Automobile-Bed for the Tourist
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HENRY FORD'S Farms serve as an experimental field for the various appliances being developed by Mr. Ford. His new home is located on the farms. This is near Dearborn, Michigan, on the north bank of the river Rouge, on the site of a pioneer mill.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0011.xml
article
870
870,871
[no value]
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Some Ingenious New Accessories For the Touring Car
A New Ford Folding Bed
Rain Protector for Automobile Wind-Shield
A Handy Automobile Grease-Gun
A Glass Hood for Automobiles
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AN entire bed equipment which weighs but fourteen pounds, and which may be folded and packed away, with the exception of blankets and comforters, in a tool box, is the latest thing devised for Ford owners who wish to avoid hotel bills. The equipment includes a piece of strong canvas, two poles or iron bars for spreaders, one for the foot and the other for the head; four half-inch iron rods for supports leading from the car-top supports to the four corners of the canvas mattress, and four ordinary straps with buckles.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0012.xml
article
872
872,873,874,875,876,877,878
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Chasing Butterflies for Money
Two Hundred Dollars for a Glittering Butterfly
“Once Over” and the Road Is Done
Some Record Dredging at Panama
A Fender for London Omnibuses
He Did It With His Little Magnet
Why a Featherduster Is Like a Fly
Paraffin Protects the Labels of Chemical Bottles
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J. McDunnough
MORE or less periodically a lurid account crops out in the newspapers to the effect that some millionaire, usually a member of the Rothschild family, has paid a fabulous sum for a butterfly—a sum ranging anywhere, according to the vividness of the reporter’s imagination, from five hundred dollars to ten thousand dollars.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0013.xml
article
879
879,880
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X-Rays and the Law
Motor-Truck’s Energy Runs a Pipe-Threader
Oiling the V’s on a Lathe
Slow-Setting Plaster of Paris
Adjustable Light-Holders for Factory Illumination
For Polishing Furniture
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X-RAY pictures have been used as evidence in law suits brought for personal injuries in order to show the injured parts clearly. To mark the negative for identification, lead letters (opaque to X-Rays) have been used, arranged at one side of the part photographed.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0014.xml
article
881
881,882,883
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Making the Burglar Chase Himself
Punctured Zeppelins
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REASONING that the easiest way to dispose of a burglar is to scare him with the thing he most fears, and that is a pistol, a Chicago man, R. C. Mayberry, has devised an apparatus which will fire off cartridges and do the scaring automatically at the very moment the burglar begins work.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0015.xml
article
884
884
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The Purse Powder-Holder
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LAUGH as we may at woman’s vanity, it is nevertheless a weakness which has been so greatly commercialized and traded on that thousands of manufacturers are maintaining large and profitable plants solely for the making of such toilet novelties and toilet accessories as powder puffs, cases for powder puffs, mirrors, rouges of all kinds, etc.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0016.xml
article
885
885,886,887,888,889,890
[no value]
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Hazards of Motion-Picture Acting: Real and Faked
A Camera Which Can Be Tilted At Any Angle
Expensive Transportation
A Traveling Laboratory for Testing Railway Scales
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E. T. Keyser
SOME people maintain that a camera will not lie. They are correct. A camera shows exactly what happens; but if you place the wrong construction upon what you find in the picture that is entirely your own fault. If, in a screen comedy, an automobile proceeds casually to ascend the front of a skyscraper, don’t miss the remainder of the reel by rushing to the box office to enquire the make of the machine.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0017.xml
article
891
891,892,895,896,897,898,899,900,901,902,903
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Ice Making at Home
An Electric Automobile Built Like a Drop of Oil
Signaling Three Hundred Miles
Strange Mineral Spring Deposit in a Nevada Desert
Orange Peel Oil Is Explosive
Air Raids Involve Problems Hard to Solve
Truly a War of Motors
A Truck with a Long Day
Consider These Miracles of Mechanics and Think
How Little We Accomplished With Horses
A Model of Trinidad’s Famous Asphalt Lake
An Improvised Flour Bin
A Strange Spongelike Rock
A Portable Dark-Room for Photographers
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Jay F. Bancroft
THERE is no sound scientific reason why a household refrigerating machine should not be a commercial success and go into very general use in private homes. There is a wide demand for such machines, and much money and engineering skill have been expended in their development.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0018.xml
article
904
904,905,906,907
[no value]
[no value]
What Shall We Do for Gasoline?
Freak Motorcycle Carries Four Passengers
Novel system of highway illumination along the crest of the Kensico reservoir
neer of the Catskill aqueduct system of water supply of
Navigating a River Boat by Sound
Doing Away With the Dish-Cloth
Bird Protection for Electric Lines
It Saves the Cook’s Hands
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THERE are about two and one-half million automobiles in use at the present time. By the end of the year their number will be well over three million. All of them consume gasoline. There are also three hundred thousand motor-boats, forty-five thousand motortrucks, thirty thousand gasoline farm tractors, and an untold number of stationary engines, all dependent on gasoline.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0019.xml
article
908
908,909,910,911,912,913
[no value]
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Ice Skating in Summer Without Ice
Skating on Salt
Limbering the Muscles of Fire-Fighters
One Reason for Appreciating the Value of Birds
Game Preserve for Ducks
What Time Is It? Half-Past Aunt Sarah by This Watch
Are Metals Alive?
Answers to Sam Loyd’s April Puzzles
Answers to May Puzzles
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ICE can be made artificially for summer skating. It has the disadvantage of melting. For that reason, chemists have devised glassy surfaces which will stand heat and which will be as acceptable as ice in winter. Some years ago a German patented a process, in which thick pasteboard plates are immersed in very hot linseed oil and varnish, mixed with glue.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0020.xml
article
914
914,915,916
[no value]
[no value]
Little Inventions to Make Life Easy
Why Weren’t They Thought of Before?
Small Electric Heater
Packing the Things You Never Can Cram into Your Suitcase
The Fruit Picker’s Sleeve-Chute
Safety-First for Window-Cleaners
A Mitten-Duster
Muffler for Bowling-Pins
Telephone-Mouthpiece Deadens Outside Sounds
Down with the Portcullis, and Your Fish Is Caught
Improved Pocket-Knife Punch
A Magnifying Needle-Threader
Mattress Handles Lighten Housework
A Perfume-Wafting Fan
An Umbrella with an Electric Fan
Convenient Holder for Toilet Articles
The Mechanical Fly Swatter
Two Kitchen-Forks in One
Cord Reel Is Telephone Convenience
A Sanitary Butter Dish
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THE electric heater shown in the illustration is very serviceable for quickly heating small quantities of water or other liquid in a suitable vessel. The large heating surface insures very quick action. An easily detached connector adds to the convenience.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0021.xml
article
917
917,918,919,920
[no value]
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For Practical Workers
Curing a Noisy Automobile Hood
A Long-Handled Screwdriver
Making an Electric Lantern from a Flashlight
Driving Screws in Inaccessible Places
A Home-made Ice-Mold
How to Etch a Water-Set
Grinding Out Dies
Drilling Holes in Sheet Metal
How to Make a Reamer
A Home-made Scalpel for Trappers
A Hose Connection Guaranteed Water-Tight
Silver-Plating Glass
How to Mend a Broken Casting
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MANY of the cheaper cars develop an annoying series of noises after they have been in use for a time, and most of these may be entirely eliminated by a little careful attention. The most common cause, outside of the mechanical depreciation, is looseness at the hood, as this rubs against the hood-ledge on the radiator and dash, and produces squeaking.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0022.xml
article
921
921,922,923,924,925,926,927,928
[no value]
[no value]
Kite Making at Home—I.
How to Build and Fly the Malay, Blue Hill Box and Tetrahedral Cell Kites
Building the Malay
How to Protect the Surface of a Laboratory Table
A Mission Stain
Gaging the Stack Draft
A Safe Way of Bending Pipes
A Toy Rubber-Elastic Winder
A Cheap Beam-Compass
Removing Waterproof India Ink Spots
How to Make a Polariscope to be Used with a Microscope
To Stop a Lathe Quickly
Cutting Tile at Any Angle
A Substitute for a soldering Iron
Taking the Squeak Out of a Sign
Handling Fine Screws
A Home-made Thumb-Screw
How to Make a Barometer
Making a Long Distance Shot with a Shotgun
Oiling Hammer Handle
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[no value]
Harry F. Rinker
THOUGH the kite is usually thought of as having four corners, with a grotesque face painted on each side and terminating in a tail of rags, the fact is that this sort of kite has disappeared. Today every boy who is scientifically inclined, can build for himself kites which are as much ahead of the one Benjamin Franklin used as the motor-cycle is an improvement over the bicycle.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0023.xml
article
929
929,930,931,932,933,934
[no value]
[no value]
How to Build and Sail a Small
Boat—II.
A Cheap, Practical Mooring for Your Boat
How to Sail Your Boat
A Camper’s Dutch Oven
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[no value]
Stillman Taylor
IN rigging the boat with a single sail, known as “cat-rig,” the mast should be stepped well forward, say about 18 ins. from the stem. If a sloop rig is preferred, the mast is stepped farther aft, to make more room for the head-sail or jib. The cat-rig is the best for a small boat.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0024.xml
article
935
935,936,937,938,939,940,941
Experimental Electricity
[no value]
Sharpness of Tuning in Radio
For Those Midnight Serenaders
Making a Simple but Efficient Flasher
A Musical Electric Door-Bell
Antenna Wire Strength
An Efficient Spark-Plug Tester
Connecting Dissimilar Telephone Lines
Connecting Wires With Tinfoil
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[no value]
John Vincent
THE effect of increased resistance in a freely oscillating circuit was described in the May article of this series. It was pointed out that the more rapid loss of energy, brought about by the presence of this added resistance, reduced the number of current oscillations in the circuit.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0025.xml
article
942
942,943,944
[no value]
[no value]
Money Prizes for Radio Articles
CONDITIONS OF PRIZE CONTEST
Unit Type of Plate Gap
Preventing the Audion from Choking
The Non-Synchronous Rotary Gap
A Wireless Log for the Amateur
Quenched Gap Damping
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We want you to tell our readers how you have overcome your wireless troubles. Every radio operator, amateur or professional, has encountered difficulties in building or using his apparatus. Many different people are bothered by the very same problems day after day.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0026.xml
article
945
945,946,947,948
[no value]
[no value]
The “Ideal” Battery
The Construction of an Automatic Battery Circuit-Breaker
How to Make a Rural Mail-Box Alarm
Japanese Wireless Telephone
An Electric Weather-Vane Indicator
Electrical Lighting Device for the Gas-Range
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[no value]
A. R. MacPherson
TO the experimenter in the field of electro-chemistry there is much unexplored knowledge which in time will prove of inestimable value to the chemistry of commerce, particularly in the methods of generating electricity through chemical actions, which at the present day, though apparently satisfactory, are very inefficient.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0027.xml
article
949
949
[no value]
[no value]
Radio Tower at Tufts College
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THE radio tower recently erected at Tufts College, Medford, Massachusetts, is attracting unusual attention. In September, when the tower was completed to a height of over 275 ft., one of the temporary guy ropes parted during a high wind and allowed the tower to topple over.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0028.xml
article
950
950
[no value]
[no value]
What Radio Readers Want to Know
Crystal Receivers
Safe Towers
Antenna Wavelength
Armstrong Receivers
Sending Transformer and Condenser
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[no value]
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W. L. K., Cincinnati, O., inquires: Q. I. What is your opinion of the carborundum crystal as compared with other mineral detectors? Are a battery and potentiometer required for the maximum degrees of sensibility? What color is the most sensitive?
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0029.xml
article
951
951,952,953,954,955,956
[no value]
[no value]
The Home Workbench
How to Make an Accurate Sun-dial
A Waterproof Compound
How to Mix Stove Blacking
Clothes-Line Suggestions
A Sanitary Kitchen Sink
How to Dry Unsightly Scrub-Rags
A Milk-Warmer Made From a Lamp-Bulb
Broom Holder from Barrel Hoop
How to Protect Sugar from Ants
How to Use Old Mantle Supports
Rejuvenating Your Pipe
A Quick Creaser
Making the Burglar Call the Police
A Cistern of Concrete
Automatic Feeding-Hopper Built for Twenty-five Cents
The Left-handed Woman’s Home Appliances
How to Make Artificial Marble
Convenient Stairway
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THIS sun-dial can be made easily and it will give accurate results. While the variation of time in all parts of the United States will be slight, the most accurate reading will be made between the 35th and 45th parallels of northern latitude as this is the area it is designed to cover.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0030.xml
article
957
957,958,959,960
[no value]
[no value]
The Ideal Home for $5,000
A Basement Complete in Every Detail
An Attractive Entrance Hall
Economy of Space Observed
Useless Expense Should be Avoided
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[no value]
Geo. M. Petersen
THE ideal home which we will describe this month, is a building in which everything was studied out in advance; in which every dollar was reckoned before the job was started and one which, through attention to details of small things, was kept down to a very reasonable figure.
PopularScience_19160601_0088_006_0031.xml