Issue: 19160501

Monday, May 1, 1916
May, 1916
5
True
88
Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Articles
cover
643
643
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0001.xml
article
643
643,644
[no value]
[no value]
Workmen Shot From Tunnel Through the Bed of a River
Militia Aero Corps
Climbing Steel Poles with the Aid of Iron Shoes
An Invisible Ink
[no value]
[no value]
Eustace L. Adams
BROOKLYN BRIDGE was jammed with mid-afternoon traffic. On the East River, far underneath the lofty structure, tugs and barges were busy with their endless tasks. Suddenly passengers on the bridge and crews of boats heard a muffled roar, and a geyser shot from the river twenty feet into the air.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0002.xml
article
645
645
[no value]
[no value]
Rocking a Three-Hundred Foot Masonry Tower with Your Hand
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY the mere pressure of your hand you can rock “Sather Campanile”—the three-hundred-and-two-foot memorial tower just completed on the campus of the University of California. In order to minimize the danger from earthquake shocks, the architect, Professor John Galen Howard, and the engineer, Professor Charles Derlith, Jr., so built the strong steel frame of the Campanile that cross-bracing is eliminated at alternate stories.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0003.xml
article
646
646,647
[no value]
[no value]
Dancing on a Revolving Floor: New York’s Latest Cabaret Fad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN order to provide its patrons with sensations that are somewhat out of the ordinary, a well-known New York restaurant has installed a revolving dancing-floor. This circular floor, which is about thirty-five feet in diameter, occupies the center of the main dining-room.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0004.xml
article
648
648,649,650,651
[no value]
[no value]
The Making of a Telegraph Boy
Training Messengers to Become Managers
Making Weather Forecasts with Flowers
Catching Turtles as a Business
Why Logwood Is Worth $200 a Ton
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is a big undertaking to produce useful and capable men from boys whose opportunities for education have been limited and who are practically without training. Yet that is the task assumed by one of our great telegraph companies. Its messenger boys are to become not merely bearers of dispatches, but men of character.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0005.xml
article
652
652,653
[no value]
[no value]
An Automatic Animal Fire Escape
A Stable Door Which Opens When a Fire Breaks Out
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY the use of an automatic, animal fire escape just presented by a Western inventor it is possible to clear any size stable of animals in five short seconds. In the operation of this fire escape the element of chance does not enter. It has a positive action, and as all working parts are controlled by gravity there is nothing to get out of order at the critical moment.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0006.xml
article
654
654,655,656,657,658,659,660,661,662,663,664,665
[no value]
[no value]
Doing Away with the Submarine’s Storage Battery
Llamas as Powder-Carriers
The Electromagnetic Hand for Armless Veterans
An Auger that Works Anywhere
Ice Dynamited so Yale Crews May Row
Handy Instrument for Physicians
Singing for the Phonograph
This Cab Simply Can’t Tip Over
Gasoline in Bulk for Panama
Machine Shovels Faster Than Forty Men
Gas Flows Back to the Earth
Buying Telephone Poles by Weight
Reverses Tug’s Propeller-Blades
Fumigating Has Improved, But Are We Less Afraid of Germs?
Fumigating Tank That Contains a Railway Coach
A Nailless Chair Made by Good Soil, Fresh Air and Sunshine
Spraying Concrete
Motion-Picture Silhouettes
[no value]
[no value]
Handy Instrument for Physicians
TERRIBLE as the submarine seems, it could be made still more terrible if it were propelled by a system simpler than that at present employed. Although no perfect engine has yet been found which is suitable for both surface and underwater propulsion, naval engineers are agreed that were it not for the storage battery the submarine might be made big enough and fast enough to take its place in the battle-line of a high-sea fleet.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0007.xml
article
666
666,667,668,669
[no value]
[no value]
Space and Time-Savers for the Home
Bedroom Hid in a Living Room
A Handy Magazine-Shelf
An Improvised Hall-Tree
A Nautical Porch Seat
Teaching Hens Good Manners
Three Tools in One
Playing Golf on the Roof
Sleep Outdoors in this Hotel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CONVENIENCE and the saving of space are of prime importance in city flats and country bungalows. Here is an illustration which shows how comfort was brought to an ugly room that served as both bedroom and living room. The addition of the wall-closet with its drop-shelf provided not only a writing-desk, but a cabinet for bottles and other small objects constantly in demand.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0008.xml
article
670
670,671,672,673,674,675,676,677,678,679,680,681,682,683,684,685,686,687,688
[no value]
[no value]
Taking Photographs From a Skyrocket
How the Skyrocket Camera Works
The Mascots of the Troops
Fighting Mud in the Trenches
The Structural Side of War
Modern Machinery Resists Even War’s Destruction
The Artifices of Modem Warfare
English Women Doing their “Bit"
All the Comforts of Home in an Airman’s Kit Case
Movable Barracks for the French
Making the Deadly Trench Torpedoes
The Paris Zeppelin Raids
The Finish of a Zeppelin
The Booming Iron-Cross Industry
Gas Is No Respecter of Persons
Villa, the International Outlaw
One Tree Grows Through Another
And His American Pursuers
Asleep On the Sleepers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AMONG the aids to the conduct of the war that have been proposed in Germany is the photography of the enemy’s positions by the flight of rockets carrying cameras. The invention is less expensive and can be sent up closer to the enemy without provoking attack than a captive balloon, dirigible or aeroplane.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0009.xml
article
689
689,690,691,692,693,694,695
[no value]
[no value]
Helpless United States
Captive Balloon Teaches a Lesson
How Fast Is Your Train Moving?
Army Pistol Shoots Colors
A One-Pound Diamond
Disinfecting School Pencils
Serving Food on the Run
[no value]
[no value]
Frederic Louis Huidekoper
ACCORDING to the latest statistics available, dated April 20, 1915, the authorized strength of the Regular Army—was 4,833 officers and 87,877 enlisted men, while that of the Philippine Scouts was 182 officers and 5,733 men, thus making a total of 5,015 officers and 93,610 men.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0010.xml
article
696
696,697,698,699
[no value]
[no value]
Exit the Mississippi Stern-Wheeler; Enter the Motor-Barge
This Barn Bears a Lesson to Pacifists
“Quiere Leche Hoy?”
A Model of Joel Chandler Harris’ Old Homestead
Washing Logs for Safety
Twitching Muscles by Means of the Electric Current
An Electrically-Lighted Clock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE old, picturesque stern-wheel Mississippi freighter and passenger boat has a rival in a new type of barge. The first of these boats is two hundred and forty feet long, forty-three feet wide and has a cargo structure two hundred feet long, forty feet wide and twelve feet high.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0011.xml
article
700
700,701,702
[no value]
[no value]
Making a Life-Saver of a Leak
A New Way of Driving a Bicycle with a Motor
Reading in Be d Made Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN a heavy sea is running, one of the glass-covered portholes in the bow of a steamer is often crushed in—an accident which, while seemingly unimportant, has resulted in the foundering of many a ship. Water rushes into the opening at the rate of many gallons a minute.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0012.xml
article
703
703,704
[no value]
[no value]
Using Triggers to Launch Uncle Sam’s Battle-ships
How Science Has Made the Launching of Dreadnoughts Mechanically Perfect
Keeping Beverages Fresh
[no value]
[no value]
Robert Howard Gordon
THE launching of a great battleship involves the problem of releasing a ship from its ways without straining the shell. In the case of such great super-dreadnoughts as the New York and Arizona, the great length and enormous weight of steel necessitate unusual care in calculating the points where the strain can be relieved by additional ways.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0013.xml
article
705
705
[no value]
[no value]
Ten-Net—An Indoor-Outdoor Game
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF “Ten-net,” a novel game invented by Halvor Achershaug, of New York, meets with the popularity which is predicted by those who have played it, both indoor and outdoor sports will be forced to look to their laurels. Many different games may be played with the nets patented by the inventor, ranging from a modified form of handball for indoor work to an exciting outdoor game somewhat resembling lacrosse.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0014.xml
article
706
706,707,708,709,710,711,712,713,714
[no value]
[no value]
New York’s Submarine Subway and How It Was Built
The Four Tubes Floated Like Boats
Digging Trench for the Tubes in the Bottom of the River
How the Tubes were Sunk
Filling the Tubes with Water to Sink Them
How the Sunk Tubes Were Joined
Pouring Concrete Through Pipes
Making Your Own Boat Repairs Under Water
Submarine Signaling with Sound Waves
Catapulting Seaplanes from Battleships
Burning Cars to Make Money
The Shingle-Phonograph
[no value]
[no value]
Howard B. Gates
A TWENTY-story building literally grows out of the ground over night; subways are built beneath our most congested streets and under rivers and we scarcely know they are there until they are ready for operation; our water supply is siphoned under rivers at great depths and runs through the very bowels of the earth in arteries hundreds of miles in length for our convenient use at faucet and hydrant; bridges spring from the opposite banks of our rivers and meet in the center within a fraction of an inch and we talk with our friends across the ocean and continent with perfect ease and understanding.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0015.xml
article
715
715
[no value]
[no value]
Teaching Blind Men to Fence
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN FRANCE, the only country where fencing can be said to flourish, a new system for teaching the use of the foil to blind men has sprung up. Its originator, Georges Dubois, has a method whereby the student is taught to rely upon the sense of touch only.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0016.xml
article
716
716,717,718,719,720
[no value]
[no value]
Out-Periscoping the Periscope
More Motion-Pictures in Color
Putting Speed in Telephone Directories
Converting an Automobile into an Apartment
How To Make Spirit Photographs
Making Money Out of Waste Land With a Stream of Water
Purifying Iron in a Vacuum
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN observation apparatus with greater range than the periscope has been constructed by Joseph de Falco, of Vineland, N. J. With it, observations can be made by a submarine without the vessel endangering itself by coming so close to the surface as the present submarine periscope requires.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0017.xml
article
721
721,722,723,724,725
[no value]
[no value]
The Modern “Horse Doctor” and How He Saves Money
The Trolley-Car Boat for Bathers
[no value]
[no value]
A. M. Jungmann
ONE million dollars is a fortune—at least it seems so to most of us. Yet animal surgery is saving one million dollars a year in New Orleans, a city of about three hundred and fifty thousand population. As New York has fourteen times as many inhabitants as New Orleans it is safe to assume that animal surgery means fourteen million dollars to New York every year.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0018.xml
article
726
726,727,728,729,730,731,732
[no value]
[no value]
Outdoors Yet Indoors
Soldering-Iron Has New Principle
A Room Papered with Postage Stamps
The Chair-Car—the Latest Development in Stagecoaches
A Sanitary Refreshment Table
A Machine Which Plugs Knot-Holes
Earrings that Denote Widowhood
A Tomahawk Grease-Gun
A Socket-Protecting Knot
Device Prevents Automobiles From Being Stolen
How a Second-Hand Automobile Made a Railroad Pay
Lifting Made Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN an effort to solve the fresh-air problem for city babies several enterprising inventors have devised arrangements whereby youthful Americans can be given all the fresh air they need and given it in perfect safety, at the same time allowing their busy young mothers plenty of time to do housework.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0019.xml
article
733
733,734,735,736
[no value]
[no value]
The Screen Player’s Make-Up
What the Camera Does to Your Face
Novel Box-Opening Knife
Poison Gas for American Pests
A Fire-Fighting Trolley-Car
A Bottle-Sealing Machine for the Home
An Electric Fan Suspended by Its Own Wire
[no value]
[no value]
Horace A. Fuld
ANY textbook on light will tell you that white light is a composition of rays forming what is known as the spectrum, and ranging from violet and blue through green, yellow and orange to red. There are also rays and colors on each end of the spectrum, for instance, ultra-violet on the violet end, not visible to the human eye.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0020.xml
article
737
737,738,739,740,741,742,743,744,745,746,747
[no value]
[no value]
Ancient Battleship Ideas Revived
Pipe Bending—A Growing Industry
A Saw-Guard Which Has a Clean Record
When Should Children Be Held Upside Down?
Canceling Checks with a Hammer and Anvil
Hog-Power in the Hog-Pen
A Scientifically Designed Train-Announcing Megaphone
Wagon-Loader Resembles Gold-Dredge
Why Can’t We Make Diamonds
A Lace Curtain Protection
Eliminating Pottery Waste
A Fiendish Plant Which Thrives on Cattle
A Wheel-barrow for Canoes
Panama’s Locks Guarded by Chains
Three-Quarters of Humanity Are Deficient in Lung-Capacity
Maud Muller Up to Date
A Continuous Railway Crossing
A Tree Which Serves as a Bridge
The Ozark Float-Boat
[no value]
[no value]
Percival Hislam
MOST people imagine that the first armored ship was the “ironcased frigate” Gloire, launched for the French navy in 1857; yet the Dutch built an armorplated vessel nearly three hundred years earher. That was in 1585, when An twerp was besieged by the Spaniards.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0021.xml
article
748
748,749
[no value]
[no value]
A Medley of Puzzles
Play Ball
How Large Is This Man’s Lot?
MARCH PRIZE WINNERS
Children A-plenty
A Daisy Game
While You Wait
Reversing Magic Squares
APRIL ISSUE PRIZES
[no value]
[no value]
Sam Loyd
IN this field of 49 baseballs the puzzling proposition is to mark off all but 20 and to leave those 20 balls in such arrangement as to score the greatest possible number of rows, 4 balls to a row. In the diagram it is shown how the balls, lettered from A to K—12 balls— are made to score 5 rows.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0022.xml
article
750
750,751,752,753
[no value]
[no value]
Blasting for Good Roads
Making a Bench Shear
An Improved Bottle Stopper
New Automobile Alarm Calls for Help
A Drill Made from a Needle
[no value]
[no value]
J. H. Squires
SOME corrective must be found for the present poor condition of roads that are already oppressive and promise to become intolerable. As for the work of building or improving roads, the advent of dynamite into this field is reducing both time and labor to a minimum.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0023.xml
article
754
754,755
[no value]
[no value]
Mechanical Tops Which Puzzle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SPINNING-TOPS, like toy soldiers and other necessities of boyhood, have existed for many years. Recently, the old standby made from a spool with a peg pushed through the center, has succumbed to more scientific devices. The principle of the gyroscope is frequently used.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0024.xml
article
756
756,757,758
[no value]
[no value]
Little Inventions to Make Life Easy
Why Weren’t They Thought of Before?
Finger-Ring to Be Used as a Pencil-Holder
This Grease-Cup Keeps Your Hands Clean
A Clothes-Pin with a Sandow Grip
Keeping the Heat Out of Milk-Cans
An Electric Whirlpool to Suck Flies to Their Doom
Counting Up on Steel Fingers
Converting a Motor-Cycle Into a Tricycle
Rough on the Hen—But Useful
To Keep Your Foot Always on the Accelerator-Pedal
A Single-Service Shaving Brush
Adjusting the Big Shoe-Stand to the Little Boy
Finger-Holds for Your Slippery Bath-Tub
Brushing Away the Tacks
This Toothbrush Can Be Used Only Once
A Lamp for the Motorist’s Glove
Keeping the Cow’s Tail Out of the Milk Pail
A Sled for Lawn-Sprinklers
Does This Solve the Refilling Problem for Fountain Pens?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A V-SHAPED spring clip is attached to a finger-ring, and is used to hold a pencil in a convenient place so that the user will not have to search for a mislaid pencil constantly and yet leaves the hand free. TO obviate the necessity of removing thegrease cup when it is desired to fill it with grease, an inventor has inserted in the cup a washer which acts as a plunger to force out the grease.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0025.xml
article
759
759,760,761,762,763,764
[no value]
[no value]
For Practical Workers
Using a Hinge for a Vise
How to Make a Distilling Apparatus
Making a Handy Power-Bench
Construction of a Revolving Drawing-Board
The Construction and Use of a Safe Driving-Box Lifter
A Pipette Attached to a Bottle
Making Dies of Difficult Outline
How to Fit Cables Into Small Terminal Holes
A Set of Jaws for Counter-Boring and Facing
No Corkscrew Needed
How to Keep the Baby in His High-Chair
A Substitute for a Condenser when Making Enlargements
A Wedge as a Burglar-Alarm
An Easy Way to Remove a Broken Chair-Leg
An Improved Darkroom Lamp
How to Send Coins by Mail
A Locomotive Apron Lifter
Uncoupling Pipes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SERVICEABLE and durable vise may be made with a few simple tools, at a very small cost. Procure an 8 or IO-in. strap hinge and cut it off along the lines marked A-B in Fig. I. Fasten the hinge, with two small bolts to your workbench or on to a board, which may in turn be fastened to the bench, as in Fig. II.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0026.xml
article
765
765,766,767,768,769,770
[no value]
[no value]
How to Build and Sail a Small Boat
Rounding Washers in a Speed Lathe
Improving Automobile Springs
Boring a Hole in Glass
Making Shrinkers
Frying Eggs by Means of an Incandescent Bulb
An Easy Way to Punch Holes in Clock-Spring Steel
An Improvised Pipe-Wrench
A Carbon-Copy Postal Card
Improving a Drawing-Ink Bottle
Hints to the Mortor-Cyclist
[no value]
[no value]
Stillman Taylor
THE average boy will find it comparatively easy to build a thoroughly satisfactory sailboat, and no difficulty will be experienced if the simple instructions which follow are well understood before undertaking the work. A boat of this flat-bottom or “sharpie” model, is the easiest of all sailing craft to construct, it will be found safe and stable and will show a fair amount of speed with a reasonable spread of sail.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0027.xml
article
771
771,772,773,774
[no value]
[no value]
A Bow-Drill for the Work-Shop
The Luminous Bottle
Non-Upsetting Holder for Drawing Inks
Inside Counter-Boring in a Miller
How to Improve a Pocket Spectroscope
A Lathe Polishing Kink
Tapping Blind Holes
How to Cut Metal and Not Cut Yourself
Handling Small Brads
Using Ice to Lower Heavy Stones
An Emergency Pipe-Cutter
Whistle on Engine of Motor-Boat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE bow-drill about to be described will be found a most useful addition to the average amateur's workbench, and although the size of the drills somewhat restrict its field of usefulness, it will be found invaluable in the construction of certain classes of apparatus.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0028.xml
article
775
775,776,777,778,779,780,781,782,783
Experimental Electricity
[no value]
Damping in Radio Circuits
A National Wireless Association
An Automatic Pressure-Gage Alarm
Fools Automobile Thieves
Lamp Resistance for Charging Storage Batteries
Recharging Worn-out Dry Batteries
Tubular Quenched Gap
An Unusual Recording Receiver
Magnetic Adjustment of Audion
Learning the Code
Telephone Receivers
[no value]
[no value]
John Vincent
THE subject of damping and “logarithmic decrement” of current and voltage in radio telegraph senders and receivers is often looked upon, by the wireless experimenter, with a certain degree of awe. This is usually because many of the textbooks and articles treat the matter as though it were very complicated and hard to understand; the fact is indeed the contrary, and the matter of damping is not at all difficult to grasp.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0029.xml
article
784
784,785,787,788,789
[no value]
[no value]
An Electromagnetic Rectifier and a Polarized Relay
The Rectifier
The Polarised Relay
Inexpensive Stranded Aerial Wire
Automatic Dead-End Switch
Avoiding Grounding in Running Metal Molding from Chandelier Outlets
Audion of Increased Sensitiveness
Constructing a Variable Condenser
How to Make an Electric Horn
Making Coils of Resistance Wire for a Small Electric Stove
Repairing a Burnt-Out Fuse
Substituting a Flashlight for a Door-Bell
Telephone-Line Test-Clips Easily Made
Changing a Telegraph Sounder Into a Relay
A Current Reverser for Small Motors
[no value]
[no value]
R. E. Ryberg
THE storage battery has become a necessity in the laboratory of the experimenter and wireless amateur. The problem then becomes one of supplying an efficient means of rectifying the alternating current in the house-lighting mains in order to charge these batteries.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0030.xml
advertisement
786
786
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0031.xml
article
790
790
[no value]
[no value]
What Radio Readers Want to Know
Receiving Tuner; Sending Condenser
The Use of Loading-Coils
Ground Connection
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. J. T., St. Louis, Mo., inquires: Q. I. Some confusion exists in my mind regarding the designs for receiving tuners. Take for example the following: For a receiving tuner to be adjustable to wavelengths from 175 to 4.000 meters, is it preferable to construct two separate tuners or may two small-sized tuners be joined together (in the primary and secondary windings) to receive the longer wavelengths?
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0032.xml
article
791
791,792,793,794,795
[no value]
[no value]
The Home Workbench
How to Build a Rabbit Hutch
How to Make an Iceless Cooler
A Vegetable Peeler Made from a Razor Blade
Soldering German Silver
A Harness Carrier
An Ear-Corn Feeder for Hogs
A Hint for Draftsmen
Making a Cheap Grocery Set of Your Own
Non-Irritating Skin Cleanser
How to Make a Glove-Box
Making Over the Lighting System
A Safe Swing for the Baby
An Improved Match-Striker
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RAISING rabbits near a large community is a profitable industry, and it is an enterprise that many schoolboys in America have embarked upon, with returns in money that are indeed out of proportion to the small amount of time and energy necessary for the proper care of the little animals.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0033.xml
article
796
796,797,798,799,800
[no value]
[no value]
Building a Bungalow—II.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
George M. Petersen
HOW often we hear the expression “You should see my bungalow— the plan was original with me and we think it ideal in every way.” Perhaps the plan was “original,” so far as the speaker is concerned, but in reality the writer has never seen a really original bungalow that was a success.
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0034.xml
article
801
801,802
[no value]
[no value]
The Popular Science Monthly for July
The Mine That Hears
How to Camp
What Sailors Don’t Know About Sailing
The Voice Typewriter; Talk and It Writes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Are mine fields a real defense against submarines? Ships are being torpedoed every day in the mined English Channel and in harbors seemingly impregnable because of the extensive mine fields that guard the entrance. Could this happen in New York Harbor?
PopularScience_19160501_0088_005_0035.xml