Issue: 19160401

Saturday, April 1, 1916
April, 1916
4
True
88
Thursday, December 4, 2014

Articles
cover
483
483
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0001.xml
article
483
483,484,485,486
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A Pigmy Zeppelin
A Barbed-Wire-Proof Fabric
Preserving Indian Speech
A Rowing-Bath
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A PIGMY Zeppelin (pigmy as Zeppelins go) with a basket-work frame of layered wood has been recently built for the British Government by a number of American constructors, including T. Rutherford MacMechen, president of the Aeronautical Society of America, and Walter Kamp, a prominent American aeronautical designer.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0002.xml
article
487
487,488,489,490,491
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Biggest Cast-iron Pipes in the World
Small Motor Trucks Deliver Coal Cheaply
A Man-Power Reel for Hauling in a Long Seine
Saves Work of the Book Gatherer
A “Center-of-the-Room” Fireplace
Not a Toy—A Real Locomotive
A Difficult Journey for an Army Tractor
Dumping a Whole Carload of Coal at a Time
Machine Fills Cracks in Pavement
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THE big gas-mains in the Astoria-Bronx Tunnel at New York are probably the largest cast-iron pipes ever made. The internal diameter is six feet; the thickness of metal is two and three-quarter inches; and the length twelve feet. The one end has the ordinary bell form; the other the spigot.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0003.xml
advertisement
487
487
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0004.xml
article
492
492,493,494
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Digging Away the Slides at Panama
Roller-Skates in Business
Motor-cycle Helps Light a Town
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THE whole Panama Canal zone may be imagined as an aggregation of slopes of hard material upon which softer materials rest. In cutting the canal the equilibrium maintained between the upper and the lower strata was disturbed. As a result the overlying material tobogganed down into the cut which constitutes the canal, upon the inclined under material.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0005.xml
article
495
495,496,497,498
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Suspension Bridges of Wire Fencing
A Cheap Way of Preserving Eggs
To the “Titanic” Heroes
TheLively Bird on Our Cover
Every Man His Own Hair Cutter
Lawn Leveling
Making Throat Examination Behind a Glass Screen
Taming Those Harbor Pirates
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SUSPENSION footbridges have been built by a wire agency in Southern Oregon, to the number of twenty in Jackson County alone, which goes to show their practicability. The method of construction is simple. Three lengths of fence are used. Two are stretched for the sides and one horizontal length serves for the bottom.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0006.xml
article
499
499,500,501,502
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Our Helpless Coast Defenses
Making a Fourteen-inch Gun Hit Harder
A Modern Fourteen-inch Gun Is Better Than Sixty Thousand Muskets
Shots That Cost One Thousand Dollars Each
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In one hundred years of naval warfare the range of guns has increased twelve times, the weight of broadsides twenty times, the speed of firing twenty times and the weight of projectiles eighty times. The most powerful weapons at present mounted on a battleship are the fifteen-inch guns of the Queen Elizabeth, England’s famous super-dreadnought.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0007.xml
article
503
503,504,505,506,507,508,509,510,511
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Ladder Tipped With Mule’s Feet
A New Quick-Acting Wrench
A Combined Electric Stove and Fireless Cooker
Straw-Stacker Does Away With Man and Pitchfork
Operating a Stage under Difficulties
A Calking Compound
Gaiters to Protect the Spring-leaves of Automobiles
An Improved Hack-Saw Attachment
This Lamp Shade Will Not Scorch
Midget Crane Has Giant Ability
Making a Hen Lay Self-Preserving Eggs
A Quaint Advertising Automobile
Gravity-Flow Gasoline Supply Station
A Portable Wrecking-Truck
An Oil-Proof Cement
Woman Invents a Life-Saving Device
Riveting Without Rivets
Motor-Testing Up To Date
The Dog as a Carrier of Disease
A Grain Elevator Which Holds Three Thousand Five Hundred Carloads
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NOT every ladder will stand with perfect safety at almost any angle on rough and uneven ground or on a polished surface. The one shown in the illustrations will, because of the tips which are placed on either end. The mule is among the most sure-footed of animals.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0008.xml
article
512
512,513,514,515,516,517,518,519,520,521,522,523,524,525,526,527,528,529
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Decoy Targets for Zeppelins
The Work, the Tragedy, and the Ingenuity of the Great War
Soldiers Big and Little
Two Queer Phases of the War
And They Call War Glorious!
All in the Day’s Work of a Soldier
Clothes of Paper and Sacking for Belgians
Natural Citadels in the Austrian Mountains
In War As Well As In Peace
Necessity is the Mother of Invention
He Is the Eye of His General—This Man in the Air
There is a Question About the Gun—Not About the Ovens
How an Enemy Trench is Mined
A Tragedy of the Skies
A Blanket with Many Uses
Why Legs Are Called “Cork”
Fun With Pictures of Your Friends
A Metal-Vapor Light That Is White
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R. J. Bjierstedt
THERE is no doubt that more powerful guns are now available than those which made so ridiculous a showing during the September and October raids on London, but the problem of adequate range finding is so nearly prohibitive that few who are familiar with it pin much hope to a gun defense.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0009.xml
article
530
530,531
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What Wind and Rain Can Do
How Nature’s Chisels Work Through Millions of Years
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ON the sloping "shores" of the great salt-incrusted playa at the bottom of Death Valley, California, which is the bed of an ancient lake, there is a large volcanic rock which, it is stated, has appeared to grow out of the ground several feet within the memory of the pioneers.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0010.xml
article
532
532,533,534,535,536
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Amputating Pittsburgh’s “Hump”
Walking Backwards Across the Country
A Convenient Flashlight for the Automobilist
Tamping Railroad Ballast with a New Air-Tool
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THE "Hump" in Pittsburgh was a hilly prominence upon which stood the County Courthouse. Adjoining it were the Frick, Carnegie, and other large sky-scrapers. It impeded travel. Hence it was decided to remove the “Hump.” This involved the cutting down of fifteen thousand feet of city street, and affecting twenty-two important city blocks.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0011.xml
article
537
537,538,539,540,541,542,543,544
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Destroyers of the Air
A Judge Who Has Succeeded Without Arms
The Allies’ Losses
An Automobile Converted Into a Railway Ore-Tractor
Stopping the Speeder with a New Danger Sign
Italians Build Highest Powered Motor Ship
Pranks Played by Trees
Giant Ladle for Molten Cinders
With a Trans-Continental Burromobile
Mahogany Steamboat Cabin for a Home
A Giant Pair of Scissors With a Symbolic Meaning
Mammoth Tusks from Alaska
How Blotting Paper Absorbs Ink
Balsa, Lightest of Woods
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Eustace L. Adams
EVEN before the advent of Fritz, the great German biplane, which for a brief time drove its adversaries from the skies, the Allies were working upon the plans for aerial battleships. One of the results is a French biplane with a wing spread of about seventy feet.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0012.xml
article
545
545,546,547,548,549,550,551,552,553,554
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Gasoline Horses for Small Farms
Is the Small Tractor Here at Last?
A Fresh-Air Funnel for Your Bedroom
An Automobile Dressing-Room for a Motion Picture Actress
Did You Know That Flour Explodes?
Sea-Scouts as Lamp-Lighters
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THE amazing popularity of the small gasoline engine and the motor-car on the farm—even the motor-truck where introduced—makes it seem perfectly natural that the internal combustion tractor should pull the plow and take the place of the horse in all field work on the average farm.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0013.xml
article
555
555,556,557,558,559,560,561,562,563,564
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Science and the Criminal
A Braided Tree
An Adjustable Crutch
Shelter-Top for London’s ’Bus Riders
Better Than the Bread Mother Baked
Repair for Cracked Window
A Detachable Motor for Bicycles
Soda Pulp Has Many Uses
Breaking Storm Billows With Compressed Air
Laundering Smoke and Using it Over Again
Telegraphing with the Telephone
Cane Holds Doctor’s Medicines
How a Boy Delivers Packages with His Own Bicycle-Trailer
A Pocket Safe
Why the Automobile “Goes Dead”
The Refreshment Tree
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Louis E. Bisch
IF a seven-year-old child were sentenced to serve a term in Sing Sing, a storm of protest would arise which would reverberate through the country. Yet, in effect, this is what is done. Criminals whose mentality measures only that of a seven-year-old child are made to serve jail terms.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0014.xml
article
565
565,566,567,568
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Ingenious Machines to Work for the Gardener and the Farmer
A Whole Garden Kit in One Tool
Digging Fence-Post Holes by Means of a New Machine
Stretching the Wire Taut
For Gathering Fallen Fruit
Taking the Bump out of the Barrow
Making a Disk-Sled of a Harrow
Effects of the War on German Industries
A Sycamore Stump for a Lamp Post
Sandpapering Made Easy
A Method for Packing Barrels
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SEVERAL devices have recently been invented to make the task of creating your own garden agreeable. A handy new implement capable of many uses has been invented by Joseph De Falco, of Vineland, New Jersey. It may be quickly converted from a hoe into a rake, from a rake into a weeder and from a weeder into a shovel.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0015.xml
article
569
569
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Raising Goldfish by the Acre
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INTENSIVE goldfish farming is more profitable than cattle-raising, in the opinion of Eugene Catte of Langdon, Kansas. He has ten acres of ponds given over to the raising of the shiny little parlor fish. Millions of goldfish have been reared by Catte since he started in the business years ago, but the demand for goldfish continues to grow.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0016.xml
article
570
570,571,572,573,574
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Expense in Motion Picture Making
Attaching Tires to their Rims Easily
Fake Gypsum Claims
Fertilizing Two Rows at Once
Taking Off the Tire in a Jiffy
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Albert Marple
IT IS indeed difficult for one who is not on the "inside" of the motion picture business to realize the expense to which a picture company will go to secure effects necessary for the successful filming of a photoplay. Sometimes the setting for a single scene costs hundreds and even thousands of dollars.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0017.xml
article
575
575,576,577,578,579,580
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The Undependable Fog-Horn
Detecting Flaws in Steel
Some Jobs You Would Not Want
Some Jobs You Would Not Want
Miniature Ships That Were Built to Prove a Point
Pure Water for Six Hundred Thousand People
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THE caprices of fog-horns present a less serious problem to the navigator than they did before the days of submarine signals, but as the use of the latter device is by no means universal, the erratic behavior of aerial signals is still responsible for many marine disasters.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0018.xml
article
581
581,582,583,584,585,586,587
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Small Racing Automobiles for Boys
Watering the Oyster
Army and Navy Clubs Please Notice
Music While You Work
A Motion-Study Stopwatch Which Does Its Own Computing
A Suitcase on Wheels
A Silo and Windmill Tower in One
A Magnetic Machine Which Saves Waste Iron
This Chair Does Duty Twenty-four Hours Every Day
Finger-Saving Nutmeg-Grater
To Take Olives from a Bottle
A Holder for Milk Bottles
Mark Your Golf-Ball with Your Initials
Interchangeable Motor-Car Grease-Capsules
New Device Distills Water for the Home
Deep Center-Punching
A Disappearing Automobile Top
An Emergency Tire Made Simply of Rope
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TO supply the demand for small run-abouts for boys, a factory has been built in Culver City, California, where one-passenger cars are made with a simple mechanism easily mastered by a young driver. They are good for a speed of twenty miles an hour and can carry a weight of five hundred pounds.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0019.xml
article
588
588,589
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A Medley of Puzzles
Off His Beat
At the Auto Races
Cheese and Crackers
At the Stamp Window
Juggling the Digits
How Old Was Jimmie?
Dividing the Farm
On the African Firing Line
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Sam Loyd
"WHAT time of the morning is it?" asked the roundsman. It was then that Finnegan’s mathematical bump stood him in good stead; for, being a few minutes late on his beat, he clouded the situation with the following truthful reply: “Just add ¼ the time from midnight until now to ½ the time from now until midnight, and it will give you the correct time.”
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0020.xml
article
590
590,591,592,593
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My Adventures as a Spy
Officer Agents
Catching a Spy
The Pluck of a Spy
Vulcanizing Tires with Exhaust Heat
A Trouble-Proof Tire
An Oil Cup for Auto Springs
Hot-Water Bottle Fits,the Back
An Anti-Clogging Oil-Gage
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Lt.-Gen. Sir Robert Baden-Powell
IT has been difficult to write in peacetime on the delicate subject of spies and spying, but now that the war is in progress and the methods of those much abused gentry have been disclosed, there is no harm in going more fully into the question, and to relate some of my own personal experiences.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0021.xml
article
594
594,595,596
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Why Weren’t They Thought of Before?
Little Inventions to Make Life Easy
Light Your Umbrella if You Are Afraid to Go Home in the Dark
Signaling to the Driver Behind You
Pen Rack Removes Ink from Nib
A Freight Hook of Many Uses
Do Not Wring Your Mop by Hand
A Fountain Tooth Brush
Adjusting a Shower Spray’s Angle
Both Direct and Indirect Lighting
A Coffee Percolator In Your Cup
Blow Up Your Shoes with Air
A Vacuum Cleaner Dust-pan
A Spring Cover for Milk Bottles
This Ice-Shaver Saves Muscle
A Foot-Propelled Motor Skate
A Tooth-Brush Which Fits Your Finger
A Policeman’s Club Which Is Also a Gun
Chalking Billiard Cues Mechanically
Parting Thick Tresses
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AN umbrella, made with an electric battery within its hollow handle, has lights affixed at each end of the stick and at the ends of the ribs. Push buttons in the handle make and break the circuit. The inventor has the idea that his umbrella will be of value in theaters and in dark streets and alleys.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0022.xml
article
597
597,598,599,600,601,602,603,604,605,606,607,608,609,610,611,612
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For Practical Workers
A Useful Gage for Motorists
How Betsy Ross Made a Five-pointed Star with One Cut
Making and Using a Small Still
Straightening Kinked Wire
How to Construct a Simple Cyclecar Starter
Removing Tires with a Clothes-Pin
Bunsen Burner and Blow-Torch Combined
Brass Tube Cleans File Teeth
Cutting Glass Bottles and Tubes with Oil
A Coarse File for Soft Metals
A Trousers-Hanger
A Piece of Furniture with Many Uses
Washing Blueprints and Bromide Enlargements
Save Fuel for Oil-Burners
A Speedometer Light for Ford Cars
Driving Piles Into Quicksand
Making a Kite-Camera
Turning Out Large Sheave Wheels Without a Lathe
A Two-Jaw Chuck
How to Wind Springs Easily
Using an Electric Iron as a Stove
How to Make a Leveling-Board
A Handy Drawer-Catch
A Paint Brush Hook
To Bore Endwise in Wood.
Filtering Mercury
A Simple Bit Gage
Blacking Box Inside Brush
Razor Blade Floor-Scraper
A Novel Polishing Pad
A Handy Drawing Table
Acid Engraving in Steel in Your Own Handwriting
Lighting Your Pipe in the Wind
Attaching an Index Plate
A Candle Motor
An Emergency Vise Repair
A Trick in Sawing
An Electric Alarm Operated by a Clock
Protecting Labels on Bottles
Workbench Made From Old Piano
A Library Paste Which Does Not Dry
Handling Small Bolts Easily
Catching Rats Wholesale
A News Stand and Blueprint Washer Combined
Laying Out Angles with a Two-Foot Rule
A Simple Way of Making Facsimile Rubber Stamps
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A VERY simple but useful attachment for the automobilist's keyring is shown in the accompanying illustration. It can be made of spring steel or hard brass, steel being preferred, however, since it can be hardened and tempered. It is made from a piece of stock about .050-in. thick, 1½-ins. long and ⅜-in. wide.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0023.xml
article
613
613,614,615,616
Experimental Electricity
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An Undamped Wave Receiver
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W. Ross McKnight
YOU are missing much enjoyment, if your wireless set is not equipped to receive signals from stations employing undamped (“continuous”) waves. Arlington transacts considerable business with a Poulsen arc transmitter. Tuckerton and Sayville, working with Germany, use undamped waves, as well as a new government station, NAJ, on the great lakes.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0024.xml
article
617
617,618
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Arc Light Interference
A Crystal Detector
Restoring Electric Light Bulbs
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IN the November and December issues of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY there were published several queries and answers on the matter of arc light interference with received signals. Our readers were asked to contribute suggestions which they found helpful in overcoming or reducing this sort of disturbance.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0025.xml
article
619
619,620,621,622,623
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The Tuning of Radio Telegraph Receivers
How to Build the Mast for a Wireless
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John Vincent
THE article of this series which appeared last month discussed the difference between free and forced oscillations in radio telegraph circuits, and applied the laws of resonance to several of the more common types of sending apparatus. It is interesting to note that the same simple fundamental laws of tuning govern the operation and adjustment of receiving apparatus, in very nearly the same way.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0026.xml
article
624
624,625,626
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Construction of Unipolar Dynamos
An Electric Soldering Iron
Storage Battery Hints
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THE direct-current dynamo, as pictured by almost everyone, is a complicated machine having many poles and an iron armature which is wrapped up with many turns of copper wire and which has at one end a huge copper commutator on which copper or carbon brushes bear gently, to conduct the energy to distributing wires and cables.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0027.xml
article
627
627,628
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What Radio Readers Want to Know
A Tikker Receiver and How it Works
Range; Aerials; Quenched-Gap
Induction from Streetcars
Receiving-Tuner Doubts Cleared Up
Where to Place Receiving Aerials
A Receiving-Condenser for 1500-Meter Loose-Coupler
Sustained Waves and Government License
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C. M., Indianapolis, Ind., inquires: Q. I should like some information concerning the “tikker” for the reception of undamped oscillations. I have heard considerable regarding continuous waves but so far have not been able to ascertain just how a tikker is constructed.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0028.xml
article
629
629,630,631,632,635,636
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The Home Workbench
Making an Acetylene Gas Generator
A Novel Window-Shelf
A Siphon to Remove Cream from Bottles
A Wash-Wringer Attachment
A Burglar-Alarm for the Unprotected Chicken-House
How to Shingle Without Leaving Nail-Holes
A Self-Rocking Developing-Tray
A Whole Tool-Box in One Tool
How to Paint Rooms
What Paints and Painting Cost
Why Good Paints Save Money
Paints for Various Surfaces
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THE gas generator used by the United States Life Saving Corps and also by the Volunteer Life Saving Corps for their searchlights on beach-wagons is not difficult to construct. Carbide about ¼ in. in diameter is used, and costs, retail, 10 cents per pound.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0029.xml
article
637
637,638,639,640
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Building a Bungalow. I
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Geo. M. Petersen
THE style of architecture best adapted for the homes of a great number of the American people, both for suburban and city use, is without doubt that commonly known as the bungalow. The bungalow originally came from India and other Far Eastern countries where light construction and cool, well ventilated buildings are desirable.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0030.xml
article
641
641,642
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How I Made $22.50
By Reading the Popular Science Monthly
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ON an investment of seventy-five cents I realized a profit of twenty-two dollars and fifty cents, or three thousand percent. It was the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY that paid the profit. I have been a constant reader of POPULAR SCIENCE for some time.
PopularScience_19160401_0088_004_0031.xml