Issue: 19160301

Wednesday, March 1, 1916
March, 1916
3
True
88
Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Articles
cover
323
323
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0001.xml
article
323
323,324
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Railroad Forts That Go Where They Are Needed
A New Idea in Preparedness
Lady Eglantine: The One-Hundred-Thousand-Dollar Hen
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WE have large cities, long coast lines and borders, also extensive areas that must be protected. It would be impracticable to fortify most of them by expensive fixed fortifications even though such fortifications were considered efficient.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0002.xml
article
325
325
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The World’s Largest Flagstaff
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A HUGE log, two hundred and fifteen feet long, and weighing eighteen tons, was recently transported from British Columbia to London, to be erected as a flagstaff in Kew Gardens. The transportation of this great timber across the ocean presented unusual difficulties.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0003.xml
article
326
326,327,328,329,330,331,332,333,334,335,336,337,338,339,340,341,342,343
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The Giant Task of the Subway Diggers in New York
Motoring on Skiis
Does Your Child Suck It’s Thumb?
Steamer Breaks Back in Storm
An Old Boiler Used for Stand-Pipe
Railroad Warning for Motorists
Sharpening Drills by Air
A Key Marker.
Mending Bones with Rivets and Wires
Something Is Wrong with this Unemotional Phonograph Fire Alarm
A Giant Grinder Which Goes to Its Work
A Test for Baggage-Smashers
Piling Lumber in Forty-Foot Monumental Stacks
Circular Barn Built of Concrete
The Hobby-Horse Turned Into a Swing
Lifting a Wagon to Dump Its Load
A Shell That Melted Money in a Ship’s Safe.
This Belt Breaks All Records
Delivering Mail by Aeroplane
The Largest Card Holder in the World
Three Slender Wires Form a Bridge
A Trolley Company Which Repairs Automobiles Damaged by Its Cars
Catching Mailed Eggs from Swiftly-Moving Trains
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Charles Phelps Cushing
IS there anywhere in New York tonight a cross section of street-life more dramatic in contrasts than the bit of Broadway in front of the Metropolitan Opera House? The Great White Way is gay, thronged, and glittering. The opera is just over; crowds in evening clothes, silk-hatted and the bejeweled, are pouring out to their waiting limousines.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0004.xml
article
344
344,345
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A Gas Well Which Wasted $200,000
Why Can a Fly Walk Upside Down?
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Harry Knowlson
"BLOWING WILD” with a deafening roar for over a week and wasting upwards of two hundred thousand dollars of natural gas is the record of the largest gas well ever drilled in Pennsylvania. The Spiegel well—for it was named after the owner of the land—is in Versailles Township, near East McKeesport, Pa., that is, in the “Pittsburgh district,” a section rich in “pay sand,” which has produced several notable gas wells.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0005.xml
article
346
346,347,348,349,350
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Spending Money by Machinery
How to Photograph Electrical Sparks
Trimming Veneered Edges by Electricity
Your Razor Is Like a Scythe
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Herbert Francis Sherwood
THERE were no commercial typewriters in Abraham Lincoln's day. The great President often wrote his letters himself. Even with the invention of the time and labor-saving typewriter, there are some tasks in writing which a great man, like the president of a corporation, could not well leave to subordinates and which were impossible of accomplishment on a machine.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0006.xml
article
351
351,352,353,354,355,356,357,358,359,360,361,362,363,364,365,366,367,368,369,370,371,372,373
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Destroyers of the Air
Exit the Black Charger—Enter the Gas Mask
Protective Devices of War
In the Trenches—and After
Hobbling Prisoners with Their Own Trousers
Women Who Do Men’s Work in War
What the Gas Clouds Look Like
Simplifying the Problem of the Hospitals
The Eyes of Joffre
Cave-Men of the Trenches
Preparing for the Crises of Battle
Inventions the War Has Brought Out
This Was Once a Peaceful Russian Town
Two Phases of War Transportation
Printing a Newspaper Is Part of the War Game
Spreading Sand over Oiled Roads by a Motor Truck Attachment
Nine Thousand. German Aeroplanes
A Convenient Step for Automobiles
Pull Yourself out of the Mud
An Owl Darkens the Town
Train and Tent Baths in Use by the Russian Army
A Cold or Wet Weather Suggestion for Motorcyclists
Automobile and Tractor, Too
A Civilized Man’s Totem Tree
Huge Twin Lanterns Light Entrance to School
Railroad Gate Warns and Stops Reckless Motorists
When Will This Reservoir Be Emptied?
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Eustace L. Adams
THE navy with the greatest number of super-dreadnoughts wins in a modern naval engagement. Since the launching of the Dreadnought, which gave the type its name, the nations of the world have been feverishly engaged, attempting to outdo one another in the building of great sea fighters.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0007.xml
article
374
374,375,376,377
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Typewriting Eight Telegrams Over a Single Wire
A Circular Bridge on Stilts
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WHEN the possibilities of sending messages over a wire by electricity were first realized, soon after Morse demonstrated the first telegraph, the limitations in the message-carrying ability of a plain circuit were encountered. The ordinary good operator could send only about one complete message per minute, and to do this he required the full use of a wire connecting him with the receiver.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0008.xml
article
378
378,379
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Cleaning New York Streets with Modern Mechanical Appliances
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COMMISSIONER J. T. FETHERSTON, of the Street Cleaning Department, of New York City, recently began the operation, in a so-called “model district,” of machinery for collecting refuse and cleaning streets. There is nothing just like it in this or any other country.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0009.xml
article
380
380,381,382
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Will Germany Live on Sewage?
Sleep in Hot Water to Rest Your Nerves
A Machine Which Climbs Poles
Running a Newspaper Plant with an Automobile
Wandering Motion Pictures
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THE problem of securing food, which confronts Germany, has occasioned a thorough, scientific investigation of the subject and its economic solution. The scarcity of fats has been especially felt, due partly to the large consumption of fat-containing foods by German people.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0010.xml
article
383
383,384
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The Peril of the Fur Coat
A House with a Sail
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A. M. Jungman
DID you ever see a rosy-faced child with a pretty white fur piece around its neck and its hands thrust deep into the comforting warmth of a white fur muff? An altogether innocent and charming sight, you would think. It is rather a disillusionment to find that death and disease lurk around that snowy fur.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0011.xml
article
385
385,386
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Simplifying the Inspection of Farm Produce
Why Do Moving Pictures Seem So Life-Like?
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DEALINGS in such commodities as fresh fruits and vegetables are peculiarly unintelligent. There is but the roughest approach to uniformity in standards of quality. Neither the buyer nor the seller knows accurately the quality of the goods bought and sold.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0012.xml
article
387
387
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Recruiting Britain’s Army with Motor-Trucks, Motion-Pictures, Mirrors and Brass Bands
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ALTHOUGH the British Army in the field at the present time is estimated at between one and two million, the regiments are located on so many fronts and fighting under such adverse conditions that the wastage of life is simply appalling.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0013.xml
article
388
388,389,390,391,392,393
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Exposing the Tricks of the ShortWeight Tradesman
Babies in Glass Cases
Why Is the Sun Hot?
A Dollar Made of Corn
A Submarine That Dived But Once
A Motion-Saving Rule-Case for Printers
An Automobile MachineShop for the Battlefield
A Steel Hill to Test Automobiles
The Noisy Motor-Boat and the Unabashed Fish
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THE efficient management of the modern household is greatly promoted by the careful use of wellselected measuring appliances. Improved systems have been slowly evolved from the guesswork of earlier times. For example, terms like the “pinch of salt," “speck of pepper,” “handful of rice," "sweeten to taste (units of vague magnitude) have gradually been replaced by definite amounts, specified and measured.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0014.xml
article
394
394,395
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Can Battery Explosions On Submarines Be Prevented?
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HARD upon the disaster which befell the F-4 off Honolulu—a disaster which resulted from a storage-battery lining and rivets being corroded by sulphuric acid fumes —comes an accident sustained by the E-2 which seems to be due to the explosion of gases generated by the storage battery.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0015.xml
article
396
396,397
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Capturing Jamaica for a Film Play
A Transfer Solution
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George F. Wörts
WHEN Annette Kellerman and her large company of players arrived in Jamaica one day last August with the intention of making a moving picture that would cost somewhere in the neighborhood of one million dollars, she found that the entire group of islands was under martial law.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0016.xml
article
398
398,399,400,401
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The Cost of the Great War
A Mystifying Chemical Trick
Raising a Motorcycle Stand Automatically
What Makes an Electric Lamp-Bulb Glow?
A Top That Never Stops Spinning
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Herbert Francis
WHEN walking along the Ringstrasse in Vienna one day a few years ago, I found myself in the neighborhood of the Hofburg, the Imperial and Royal palace. It was one of the days when visitors were admitted to the “Treasury of the Imperial House of Austria,” so I turned through the gate and having witnessed the impressive ceremony of the changing of the guard, paid my krone and marched in.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0017.xml
article
402z
402z,403,404
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Carving the Confederate Army in a Granite Mountain
The Bridge That Telephones Built
A Sensible Feeding Bag for Horses
A Dreadnought’s Buoy.
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A MONUMENT to be carved out of the living granite of a mountain, a monument of flawless granite two miles long and a thousand feet high—to be built as an everlasting memorial to the people of the South and the cause of the Confederacy—such is the gigantic task allotted to Gutzon Borglum, one of America’s foremost sculptors.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0018.xml
article
405
405,406,407,408,409,410,411
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Floating a Sunken Warship with a Bubble of Air
Cages Saved the Divers from Sharks
A Military Automobile From Fittings
For Squeamish Fowl-Killers
This Automobile Signal Takes the Place of Your Hand When Rounding a Corner
A Safety Wringer-Guard
A Novel British Piston Ring
This Factory Burns “Sauerkraut” for Fuel
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M. G. Cary
SALVING the Mexican gunboat Progreso, sunk by one of the factions opposed to Carranza at Progreso, Yucatan, was interesting because the vessel suffered an injury identical with that which would have been caused had she been torpedoed. What is more, she was converted by compressed air into a huge bubble, so that she was able to make a long voyage under her own steam.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0019.xml
article
412
412,413,414,415,416,417,418,419,420,421
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Why Cotton Is Contraband of War
Saving the Asphyxiated with a New Air-Pump
Is This Actual Color Photography at Last?
A Brazilian Snake Farm
A Movable Storehouse Elevator
Why Do We Have Two Eyes?
Why Is the Sky Blue?
A Stairway Which Is Also a Door
A Folding Service-Wagon
A Dust-Collecting Window-Ventilator
An Elevated Road Which Tried to Outstrip a Town
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Hudson Maxim
COTTON happens to be the best combustible element to combine chemically with nitric acid so as to produce a high explosive, and also to serve as the principal ingredient for the manufacture of smokeless powder. A bale of cotton may, therefore, be considered a bale of guncotton in embryo.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0020.xml
article
422
422,423
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Delia the Motor Duck
Baking a Railroad Car to Dry the Paint
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THOUSANDS of bathers at a famous beach near San Francisco were recently astonished to see a rakishlooking automobile drive down the beach and into the water. Instead of immediately disappearing beneath the waves, the automoble rode high over the swells, and still moving rapidly, took a short cruise around the harbor, after which it came ashore and disappeared as suddenly as it had appeared.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0021.xml
article
424
424,425
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A Torpedo with Eyes
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Walter Bannard
SUPPOSE we have at our command torpedoes that obey the orders of a single master; torpedoes that heed faithfully the wish of an operator expressed through a simple directing apparatus; torpedoes that can be projected six or eight miles through the water, being constantly under the control of the man and his machine on shore; in a word, torpedoes which carry out the intention of one man to destroy an oncoming vessel of the enemy.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0022.xml
article
426
426,427,428,429
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The Electric Dog and How He Obeys His Flashlamp Master
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B. F. Meissner
THE electrical dog. which Mr. John Hays Hammond, Jr., and I designed, and which has received much publicity, has no tail to wag and no voice to bark with, but he can follow a person about in a most surprising way. Like the sunflower that follows the sun in its path across the heavens, my first apparatus was capable of turning itself only to face the object that stimulated it.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0023.xml
article
430
430,431
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A Medley of Puzzles
The Presidential Puzzle
Puzzling Kugelspiel
The Cost of a Villa
An Elephant on His Hands
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Sam Loyd
We asked the puzzle man to prepare for our readers a variety of his popular problems—mechanical, mathematical and otherwise. Here we have his first offering. Let us put on our thinking caps and see who can unravel his interesting posers.—Editor.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0024.xml
article
432
432,433,434,435
[no value]
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How to Ascertain Your Latitude and Longitude
A Vulcanizer for Tire Repairs
Improving the Old Fashioned Ice-Skate
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Hereward Carrington
THERE is a very simple way by means of which the novice, untrained in astronomical observation, can determine his latitude, without the aid of complicated and expensive apparatus. If you were situated on the equator, the north star would be directly north of you.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0025.xml
article
436
436,437,438
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Little Inventions to Make Life Easy
Why Weren’t They Thought of Before?
Cigar Tip Protector of Many Uses
Tricking Fish with Electric Minnows
Head-Guard for Alley-Boys
Trapping Mice in a Milk Bottle
More Accurate Calipers
Burnishing With the Sewing-Machine
A New Kind of Pin-Cushion
Bicycle Frame Holds a Tire Pump
Collapsible Millinery for Traveling
Holding Meat While Carving
Preventing Furniture from Chipping Walls
A Cutter for Fiber Phonograph Needles
Conquering the Obstinate Oyster
Can Maidenly Modesty Ask for More?
A Muscle-Saving Potato Masher
One Motion of the Handles Works These Scissors’ Blades Twice
A Paper Milk-Bottle with a Window
A Salt and Pepper Shaker
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A CONESHAPED cap to protect the tip of a cigar is made with a projecting piece extending half the length of the cigar. This projecting piece is a label, as well as a surface upon which a match can be struck. In the center of the conical top is a small hole through which a match can be inserted into the cigar, to make a draft opening without cutting the end of the cigar.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0026.xml
article
439
439,440,441,442,443
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For Practical Workers
A Spirit-Level for Use in Dark Places
To Face Left-Hand Nuts
Home-Made Motion Picture Camera
The Flap-Lock Envelope
How to Make a Self-Honing Razor Strop
An Electrically-Operated Screwdriver
A Simple Air-Pump
Gage for Duplicate Hole Drilling
A Barrel for Filling Sacks
How to Saw Difficult Angles on Small Stock
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T. F. BUSCH
C. ANDERSON
E. G. GETTINS
J. A. McMANUS
F. T. BUSCH
E. A. HODGSON
A MILLWRIGHT must often set up machinery and benches before a tenant has moved into a building. As the gas and electric lights are not turned on before the tenant takes possession, it is hard to level shafting, foundations, benches, etc., in dark places, especially on dark, rainy days.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0027.xml
article
444
444,445,446,447,448,449,450
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How to Build an Aero Ice-Racer
A Simple Gas-Pressure Regulator
An Emergency Drill Press
A Handy Chuck for a Small Lathe
Utilizing Empty Cartridges
The Thermos Bottle as a Stove
To Adjust a Light-Cord
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R. U. Clark
ILLUSTRATED accounts of several motor-driven ice-boats have appeared for some time past in different publications. The machines depicted have been more or less alike, and practically all have born a close resemblance to an ordinary sled fitted with a motor.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0028.xml
article
451
451,452,453,454,455
[no value]
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Experimental Electricity
Safeguarding Vessels by Radio
Transmitting Distributors of the Telefunken Compass
The Earth’s Conductivity
Finding the Positive Wire
How to Prolong the Life of Battery Cells
The Obligation to Secrecy.
Springless Electric Bell
Photographic Records Still Impracticable
A Simple But Powerful Arc-Light
An Electric Heater in the Garage Makes Cranking Easy
The Wireless Idea Is More Than Seventy Years Old
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Annis Salsbury
ONE wreck a day is said to be the average on the fog-visited Pacific Coast. Commerce on the Great Lakes, while possible during only half the year, is exposed to dangers inherent in waters visited by dense and persistent fog. Likewise, the Atlantic Coast is not without this menace to navigation, for it runs a close second to the Pacific in the number of its sea tragedies; the Gulf of Mexico is also frequently blanketed with mist, and there the dangers of collision or grounding on coral reef or sand bank are much increased.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0029.xml
article
456
456,457,458,459,460,461,462,463
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Recent Radio Inventions
Microphonic Relays; An Unusual Quenched Spark-Gap; a Slipping-Contact Detector
An Improved Crystal Detector Stand
Loose-Coupler Switch Arrangement
Making a Master Vibrator for Automobiles
Cutting Brass
A Motor-Operated Aerial Switch
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A. F. Jackson
FOR a number of years inventors struggled to produce microphonic relays, but their work was practically without substantial success. It was not found possible to build an instrument which would magnetically modulate the current through a microphone contact in such a way that all the vibrations of the human voice could be reproduced and magnified.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0030.xml
article
464
464,465,466,467,468,469,470,471,472
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Free and Forced Oscillations in Radio Telegraphy
Making a Simple Alternating Current Rectifier
A Tuning-Coil Slider
Radio’s First Rescue
Reconstructing a Dry Battery
Electric Door-Opener for a Garage
Mounting Spark-Gaps to Eliminate Unnecessary Noise
Winding Tuning-Coils
What Radio Readers Want to Know
Range of Station
Condenser for Transmitter
Inductively Coupled Tuner
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John Vincent
THE February article of this series pointed out how closely all oscillation circuits resembled each other, whether or not they contained spark-gaps and whether they were open antennas or closed condenser-circuits. Not all of the similarities were brought out, however, and it is interesting to note that for all practical purposes the rule last given, for finding the time period of an oscillating spark-circuit, is the same as that for determing the resonant wavelength of an antenna.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0031.xml
article
473
473,474,475
[no value]
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The Home Workbench
A Simple Method of Clearing a Clogged Waste Pipe
Inclined Sidewalk for a Wheeled Invalid Chair
A Stand Made From Old Spools
A Cheap Substitute for Linoleum
Lengthening the Life of a Worn-out Clock
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REMOVE the top and bottom from a discarded tomato or other can and place it over the outlet from the sink, as illustrated. Procure a block of wood that will easily fit into the tin, as shown. With a hammer hit a sharp, strong blow on the wooden block, and away goes the stoppage.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0032.xml
article
476
476,477,478,479,480
[no value]
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An Extension to a Kitchen
Using a Suction Pump to Clear a Clogged Drain
A Door Retainer
A Garbage and Paper Burner
Concealing the Spare Silver
A Flower-Pot Hanger
A Modern Sanitary Hog House
A Hen-House Water Supply Which Will Not Freeze
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George E. Walsh
IN many houses, there is no room for little devices, especially when these are for the kitchen. The old house has been remodeled and extensions added, but the kitchen has not kept pace with the growth of the rest. There is a great deal of work to do in too small a space.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0033.xml
article
481
481,482
[no value]
[no value]
Money Prizes for Radio Articles
Conditions of Prize Contest
The End of a Battle in the Air
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We want you to tell our readers how you have overcome your wireless troubles. Every radio operator, commercial or experimental, has encountered difficulties in building or using his apparatus. Many different people are bothered by the very same problems day after day, and it will help you to learn how others worked to get successful results.
PopularScience_19160301_0088_003_0034.xml