Issue: 19160201

Tuesday, February 1, 1916
February, 1916
2
True
88
Thursday, December 4, 2014

Articles
cover
163
163
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0001.xml
article
163
163,164
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Mining the Air Against Zeppelins
The Plan Is Feasible in Water
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Carl Dienstbach
THE failure of the English high-angle anti-aircraft artillery to destroy Zeppelins attacking London has been repeatedly demonstrated, and it has stimulated many a scientific mind to invent some more efficient means of defense. At night the English aeroplanes are at a serious disadvantage, since the glare of the ground searchlights renders it almost impossible to drop bombs on the enemy with any degree of accuracy.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0002.xml
article
165
165,166,167,168,169,170
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Cleaning New York’s Snow-Clogged Streets With Motor-Trucks
An Island Made to Order
The Longest Letter in the World
Steam-Driven Models Made by a Handless Mechanic
Tearing Up Rails with a Motor Truck
A Motor-Cycle Converted into a Motor-Sled
Electric Candles on a Nine-Story Birthday Cake
A Boy’s Street Boat
Bread Without Grain Flour
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ON Monday morning, December 13, came New York’s first heavy snow storm of the winter. When business men and women started for work, the city’s transportation lines were sadly disorganized. Street cars, ’busses and taxicabs floundered through the snow and took workers to their offices, hours late.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0003.xml
article
171
171,172,173,174,175,176
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Enlisted Men: The Foundation of the American Navy
Radio Telegraphy
Iron Industry Gains in Germany.
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Josephus Daniels
ONE of the curious and unexpected things which I have found since I assumed the duties of Secretary of the Navy has been the effect of a too near point of view in destroying the perspective of some of our ablest Naval Officers as to what the subordination of everything connected with the Navy to its military functions really means, and how far back military preparation must begin.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0004.xml
article
177
177,178,179
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Fish That Travel on Land
Natural Cannonballs
The Devil’s Post Pile
Fossil Plants Twenty Million Years Old
A Piece of Salt that Weighs Two Hundred Tons
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SCIENTISTS rarely go a-fishing in troubled waters ; Professor S. O. Mast, however, of the zoological department of Johns Hopkins, is an exception. The Johns Hopkins professor discovered that such fish as minnows are often found in the little temporary pools left in the sand by the tide, but rarely, if ever, after the water in such a tide is so low that the outlet is closed.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0005.xml
article
180
180,181,182,183,184,185
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Niagara on Tap
A Mile-a-Minute with an AirDriven Sled
A Sleeping Nest With an Electric Elevator
Publishing a Paper Aboard a Train
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Professor Thomas H. Norton
THERE must be some practicable, workable thesis, according to the terms of which, on our own continent for example, the rights of its inhabitants shall suffer no material diminution in the opportunity to fully enjoy the splendor of Niagara, while conditions are created which permit the utilization, on a satisfactory scale, of the tremendous source of power,—one of the nation’s grandest assets.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0006.xml
article
186
186,187
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America’s First Thirty-Five Knot Battle-Cruiser
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COMMON sense teaches everyone that speed, range, striking power and adequate armor protection, are essential in a fighting vessel and the ship in which these are combined to a pre-eminent degree most fully meets the ideal. But it is no easy matter to unite all these attributes in a single craft of a given tonnage.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0007.xml
article
188
188,189,190,191,192,193,194,195,196,197,198,199,200,201,202,203,204,205,206,207,208,209,210,211
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Is Mars Alive?
The Seven Hundred Puzzling Canals and What They Mean
A Bridge of Boats
In this War of Big Guns
Curious Phases of the War
Where the Austrians and Italians are Fighting
Austria’s Natural Citadels
War Trades Practiced at the Front
Guns and Games at the Front
New Labors of Hercules
The Fangs of the British Navy
Searching for the Best Respirator and Mask
What War Means to Ancient Art
Women Shouldering the Burdens of War
An Artillery Shell Used as a Bomb
Underground Engineering at the Front
Water and War
The French Helmet’s Practical Success
The Hardships and Pleasures of War
A Machine That Thinks Up Movie Plots
A French Motor-Tricycle Sweeper
The Latest Style in Handcuffs.
Have You Eaten Your Cow?
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Waldemar Kæmpffert
IT was in 1877 that the Italian astronomer, Schiaperelli, detected on the planet Mars those curiously straight lines which he christened canali and which have since been a bone of contention among astronomers. Later he also saw his “canals” double, very curiously, until they looked like parallel railway tracks— something which has not been satisfactorily explained to this day.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0008.xml
article
212
212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,221,222,223,224,225
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The Home Engine of Many Uses
A Machine to Pull up old Telegraph Poles
A Racing Car Built of Tires
A Tree Captures a Fence
To Keep Automobiles off Railroad Tracks
It Looks Like a Telescope, but It’s Really a Camera
What Is the Best Shade Tree in the United States?
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THE farmer is probably buying more gas engine horse power today than any other half dozen general classes. Besides being the most generous purchaser of motor cars and practically the sole buyer of tractors, he purchases the greater part of the half million stationary and portable engines turned out annually by several hundred American manufacturers.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0009.xml
article
226
226,227,228,229,230,231
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Perils of the Bad Road
Sprinkling Streets with the Aid of an old Fort
Signal Lights for Traveling Cranes
The Sculptor’s Use of a Pneumatic Chisel for Artistic Carving
An Automobile Road Sign and a Map Combined
Forest Rangers Must Fight Snakes as Well as Fires
Making Butter by the Barrel.
A Merry-Go-Round in the Water.
Motion Pictures on the Firing Line
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O. R. Geyer
WITHIN the last few years Iowa has been brought face to face with the new problems of preventing the tremenduous loss of life on the state’s highways. Every state in the Union is confronted with the same problem. Failure to exercise even the most important safety first principles is costing the lives of more than one thousand Americans each year, according to statistics compiled by road experts.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0010.xml
article
232
232,233,234
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Inspecting the Inside of the Earth
The Size of a Railway Station
Power from a Floating Water Power Plant
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IN mining for coal or metals, operators must know a number of things about their claims in advance unless they are out-and-out gamblers. Before starting operations at a mine the thickness, extent and richness of the vein must be estimated in order to determine whether the mine can be worked profitably.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0011.xml
article
235
235
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How to Make Knots, Ties, Hitches and Bends
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PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0012.xml
article
236
236,237
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Brushing Your Teeth; There Is a Right and a Wrong Way
Hard-Pressed Germany Invents New Foods
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IF people as a whole were aware of the importance that a toothbrush plays in the healthful happiness of their entire body more attention would be paid to this perfunctory daily exercise. The soberness of this fact is perhaps a trifle more evident when it is mentioned that mouth infection is now known to be the source of numerous diseases that cause chronic sickness and eventually death.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0013.xml
article
238
238,239,240,241,242,243,244,245,246,247,248
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A Journey to Cloudland
Clouds are Always Falling
The “ White Flag of the Chinook ”
What Is Hoarfrost?
A Curious Tobacco Pipe-Borer
New York Trains That Play Leap Frog
The Danger of Safety-Tin Boiler Plugs.
Our Women Police
Charles M. Schwab Lifts a House over Trees: Sentiment vs. Cost
A Queer Adventure in War
A Natural Stadium Which Holds One Hundred and Thirty Thousand
Fifty Thousand Aviators
Paper from Grass
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THE clouds, like the stars, are among those common objects of Nature upon which men look, for the most part, with unseeing eyes. Some aspects of the clouds do, indeed, force themselves upon our attention—chiefly those that denote the imminence of a storm—but few of us realize to the full the beauty and scientific interest of the vapory pageant that is continually sweeping across our skies.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0014.xml
article
249
249,250,251,252,253
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Government Manufacture of Aeroplanes— A National Menace !
Making a Dancing Floor Into a Skating Rink
Hazards of Aeroplane Making
Our Big Birdseed Bill
A Business Office in the Open Air
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Eustace L. Adams
A GOVERNMENT factory for the manufacture of aeroplanes and motors. The specter which haunts those who hope to see the United States take her place among the nations with a fleet of aircraft which will demand, and receive, respect ! The experiment which cost Great Britain nearly five millions of dollars, and produced, altogether, fourteen flying officers and seventeen aeroplanes at the end of a wasted three years!
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0015.xml
article
254
254,255,256,257,258,259,260,261,262,263,264,265,266,267,268,269
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Saving Men from Scalding Steam in Steamship Engine Rooms
Testing Shrapnel Shells in Electric Ovens
An Ant-Heap as a Look-out Station
Living In a Tree Stump
Detecting Fires in the Holds of Transatlantic Liners
How to Sit Straight and Still be Comfortable
Concrete to Replace Willow Mats
Testing a Hack-Saw’s Strength
A Lens That Remains in Focus
Wisconsin Cook’s Doughnut-Drainer
And Now Comes the Front-Wheel Drive Motor-Cycle
Three-Wheeled ’Rickishas for Asia
A Makeshift Polarity Indicator
A Giant Metal Shoe
Painting Cars Rapidly
Making An Automobile Tire Casing
A Saw That Stands Up
Josef Hoffman Invents a Shock Absorber
Door Parcels-Receivers
A Handy Darkroom Lamp
A Rolling Clock
Cracking Nuts Three at a Time
“Growing Pains” are Rheumatism
A Bird-House That Can be Cleaned
Aeroplane Drift and What It Means
Battery Wax Recipes.
Oil Mop Cleaner and Dustpan
Applying Hot Road Material
With the Forty-Niners
An Adjustable Auto Foot-Pedal for Short-Legged Drivers
An Extra Seat for Ford Cars Which Hangs on the Door
Beeswax for Cracks and Holes
This Folding Motor Bucket Is Also a Game Bag
A Machine for Cleaning Blackboard Erasers
If You Only Have a Rope
A Bunsen Burner Flat Iron
A Hair-Drying Comb
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THE engine and boiler room forces of a steamship need no longer die like rats in a trap when a steam pipe explodes and fills the compartment with scalding vapor, if the invention of Mr. Ernest H. Peabody and Walter B. Tardy, of New York, is adopted by any of the steamship companies.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0016.xml
article
270
270,271
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That Mathematical Short Cut
Short Cuts in Arithmetic
Be Sure You’re Right
Hotel Keys Which Take the Place of Shouting Call Boys
Water That Cannot Be Cut
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THE principle described by Mr. Shourn in the November issue of the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY as a “Short Cut in Multiplication,” can be used equally as well in addition, subtraction and division, with slight variations. To use his figures in Addition.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0017.xml
article
272
272,273,274
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What’s New in Patents
Little Inventions to Make Life Easy
A New Headlight Dimmer
Keeping Your Sole Warm
Adjusting a Brush to Its Handle
For Applying Chains to Wheels
An Egg-Tester and Mailing Tube Combined
A Clothes
Combined Coat Hanger and Trousers Stretcher
Making it Easy for the Birds
A Simple Signal for Automobiles
Keeping Shampoo Soap Out of Your Ears
A Shaving Mug with a Soap Pump
Snapping the Snapping Turtle
A Headlight Dimmer Operated from the Seat
A Stepladder and Ironing Board
Increasing your Grip on the Golf Club
It’s a Wise Man That Knows his own Tooth Brush
A Sop to Feminine Vanity
Making Potato Chips by Machine
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A SMALL searchlight is nested in one of an ordinary size, providing two complete headlights, one within the other. The larger one, when lighted, throws its beams in an anular ring of light past the headlight which has been nested therein. This makes a dim light.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0018.xml
article
275
275,276,277,278,279,280,281,282,283,284,285,286,287,288,293,294
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For Practical Workers
To Prevent Bolt from Turning When Unscrewing Nut
Saw Box
Potato Roaster for Campers
An Electrical Peddler Chaser
Prevents Casks Slipping While Unloading
An Electric Toy Semaphore
Saving Time in Tracing a Design
Enlarging a Runabout’s Capacity
A Non-Spillable Funnel
Mat-Making for Photographers
Shock Absorbers
Eliminates Pants’ Guards for Bicycle Riders
A Try-Square Aid
How a Jack Knife Can be Used as a Compass
Enlarging Without Dividers
Bending Brass Tubes Without Kinking
A Self-Lighting Arc Light
An Ingenious Electric Connector
To Prevent Rust
Rinsing Photographic Negatives Without Running Water
Small Screws in Difficult Places
A Mysterious Motor
Filter for Lubricating Oil
Fuse for Storage Battery Circuits
A Way of Fastening Machine Parts
A Capacity Job
A Good Belt Compound.
Sleigh Attachment for Perambulators
Substitute for Large, Gas Reservoir
Prevents Insulation Unwinding
Drilling Holes in Glass
Hydraulic Blowing Arrangement
Emergency Bolts
Renewable Fuses
The Care of Paint Brushes
Lengthens Life of Blow-Torch Burners
A Self-Adjusting Sandpaper Block
A Handy Way to Repair a Tire
A New Use for Broken Drills and End Mills
A Home-Made Football Inflater
A Dust-Proof Bottle for Acid
Parcel-Carrying Rack for Bicycle
Switch Detects Bad Ignition
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THE bolt will often turn in unscrewing nuts, and should it be a carriage bolt difficulty is often experienced in unscrewing the nut at all. The accompanying illustration shows a very simple method of preventing the bolt from turning, by simply clamping a coarse file over the head of it, as indicated.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0019.xml
article
295
295,296,297
RADIO SECTION
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Aeroplanes, Wireless and the War
Devoted to the Encouragement of Amateurs and Experimenters in the Field of Radio Communication
Duplex Wireless Telegraphy.
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William Dubulier
THE art of warfare has been transformed by wireless and wireless has in turn been transformed by modern warfare. We can safely say that the one great electrical event of the war is the use of wireless even between trenches, and the directing of artillery fire.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0020.xml
article
298
298,299,300,301
RADIO SECTION
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Recent Radio Inventions
New Patents on Wireless Instruments
A Cheap Ground Clamp
Crystal Detector Hints
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A. F. Jackson
AMONG the most interesting patents of 1915 is No. 1139226, issued to E. Raymond-Barker, for a system of radio-telegraphy using two wave-lengths for transmission of a single message. Instead of sending Morse signals in which the dots and dashes are distinguished by the difference in duration of impulses, this method uses signals all of the same impulse length but distinguishes between dots and dashes by sending each at a different wave frequency.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0021.xml
article
302
302,303,304,305
RADIO SECTION
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Antenna Circuits in Radio Telegraphy
Edison’s Railroad Wireless
A Roof Insulator
International Conference at Washington
Radio Has Velocity of Light
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John Vincent
IN the two earlier articles of this series, the simple relations between capacity, inductance, wavelength and resonant frequency were explained. It was shown that in a closed circuit such as that of Fig. 1, the maximum current would flow when the impedance (or alternating current resistance) was made as small as possible.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0022.xml
article
306
306
RADIO SECTION
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The Static Coupled Receiving Tuner
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John L. Hogan
NEARLY all experimenters are familiar with the action of the ordinary inductively coupled receiving tuner illustrated in Fig. I. With this arrangement of apparatus, if the elements are well designed and manipulated, excellent results in tuning may be secured.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0023.xml
article
307
307,308
RADIO SECTION
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A Mexican Radio Station
A Variable Condenser
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Stanley E. Hyde
IN MEXICO at present there are eight radio stations, situated at Vera Cruz, Campeche, Obispo, Maria Madre Island, Mazatlan, San Jose del Cabo (end of Lower California) Santa Rosalia and Guaymas. During the recent troubles in Mexico the rebels destroyed the station on Maria Madre, which is one of a group of three Pacific Coast islands belonging to Mexico, situated about ninety miles southwest of the State of Tepic.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0024.xml
article
308
308
RADIO SECTION
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Radio Club News
Radio Club of Redlands
Wireless Club in Salt Lake City
Pensacola Junior Radio Club
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THE Technical Association of Licensed Operators, was formed on October 21, 1913. Meetings are held fortnightly, at which papers are presented and discussed. The present officers are: W. Woodrow, President; E. T. Dickey, Secretary and Treasurer. Other clubs are invited to address communications to the secretary’s office, 1649 Amsterdam Ave., New York City.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0025.xml
article
309
309,310
RADIO SECTION
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What Radio Readers Want to Know
Indoor Aerial
Radio Telephone
Multiple Tuner
Receiving Set
Receiving Distance
Armstrong Circuit
Single Radio Receiving Station
Loose Coupler
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C. J., Detroit, Mich., asks : Q. 1. Would it be possible to use the lighting circuits in the house for an aerial, it being understood that the main switch is open? A. 1. While not a very efficient aerial system it might be used under certain conditions. If the wires are not placed in metal conduits or in no way grounded, the system could be used. Nothing but local stations would probably be received.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0026.xml
article
311
311,312
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The Home Workbench
Avoiding Dangerous Stair Turns
A Dustless Ash Sifter
zAn Outdoor Window Bed.
For the Amateur Painter
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THE turn of an ordinary narrow staircase is so sharp and the steps at the inner part of the turn so narrow that a person in a hurry is likely to stumble and fall. The danger of injury can be considerably reduced by construcing the stairs with the steps wider at the inside of the turn.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0027.xml
article
313
313,314,315,316,317
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How to Make a Simple, Automatic Window Closing Device
For Conserving Heat in Steam Pipes
How to Make a Snow-plow to Clean the Sidewalk
A Clock Light for Dark Mornings
An Automatic Desk Lamp
Making Use of Cupboard Space for Refrigerator
Fastening Wood With Screws
To Make a Mission Screen
Seam Ripper from Old Safety Blade
To Open a Molasses Jar
A Simple Ruby Light
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THE object of this device is to enable one to sleep in a room with the windows open during cold weather without the disadvantage of having a cold room in the morning. Briefly, it consists of an electro-magnetic latch which holds the window open during the night until at some predetermined hour, early in the morning, an alarm clock operates a switch in the latch circuit which releases the latch and allows the window to close.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0028.xml
article
318
318,319,320
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A Combined Ice House and Cold Storage Room
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AN arrangement of a cold storage room for keeping milk, butter, eggs, fresh meats and small fruits in combination with an ice-house seems to meet the requirements of many country houses. Where perishable articles are purchased or obtained elsewhere in quantities, there is felt a need for some cold storage place other than the ordinary ice-box, which after all, is intended chiefly for articles in use from day to day and is rarely of sufficient size to accommodate large quantities of food.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0029.xml
article
321
321,322
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Our Readers’ Service Department
Forts on Rails to Travel Along Our Defenseless Coasts
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Since our editorial pages must be kept free from advertising matter of any kind, we cannot mention manufacturers' names, trademarks and the like. But if you want to know more about some simple tool or appliance which you can use in the shop or the home and which was described or illustrated in the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, if you want to know who can supply more information on a subject which has been discussed in our pages, write to our Readers' Service Department.
PopularScience_19160201_0088_002_0030.xml