Issue: 19160101

Saturday, January 1, 1916
January-June, 1916
1
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88
Thursday, December 4, 2014

Articles
cover
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0001.xml
article
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The Vision of a Blind Man
He made science popular in the homes of America
With his sightless eyes he looked into the future
A color chemical chart invented by a blind man
Forty-four Years After
Herbert Spencer brought the magazine into being
Famous men who thought deeply and wrote simply
The more efficient means for diffusing knowledge
Making the big idea work to fit these big times
Kaempffert, the editor, is scientist and interpreter
This is the first law: It must be interesting
Mechanical vaudeville is given at its real value
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THE progress due to science and invention in America, which makes this Twentieth Century so wonderful, so rich, is a tribute to the vision of a blind man. The science department in every university, the technical schools, owe more to him than to any other one personal force.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0002.xml
advertisement
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0003.xml
article
3
3,4,5,6
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A Fire that Burned Four Months
A Parapet of Sand to Check the Flames
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A. G. Fasbinder
DURING a violent thunder storm a bolt of lightning struck the oil-soaked ground near the Potrero del Llano No. 4 oil well near Tampico, Mexico, the greatest oil well in the world. For more than four months from that date, August fourteenth, 1914, the resulting conflagration resisted all efforts to subdue it.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0004.xml
article
7
7,8,9,10,11,12
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Twelve Million Dollars for Twenty Minutes Train Time
Locomotives Serve as Fire Engines
An Armless Man Who Drives a Car at Racer’s Speed
Imitation Hand Signals a Turn
Sea Shells for Decorating Concrete
The “Back Yard Limited”
Sidewalk Shelters for the Trolley Patrons of Cincinnati
Edison’s Phonograph Diaphragm to Record Only Faint Sounds
Artificial Rainstorm Tests Car Roofs
Telephoning from a Moving Train
Lengthens Life of Rubber Gloves
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TO cut twenty minutes from the running time of passenger trains and one hour from the running time of freight trains between New York and Buffalo, the Lackawanna Railroad has invested twelve million dollars in a concrete arch half a mile long.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0005.xml
article
13
13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20
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The Destruction of the Emden
Steel Crumpled Like Paper
Suppose New York Had been the Target
An Excavation for a Road Leaves House on Brink
Women in Europe’s Machine Shops
Shipping Pigs in Baskets.
Selling by Show-Window Telephone
Oil is Cheaper than Coal
A Pueblo Village for the Garden of the Gods
Monument Built to an Apple Tree
Two Bridges with but One Approach
A Vast Tank with a Park on Top
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Rear-Admiral Bradley A. Fiske
WHEN making her last raid, which was against South Keeling, an island of the Cocos group, a few hundred miles southwest of Sumatra and Borneo, and while she had three officers and forty enlisted men on shore, the German commerce-destroyed Emden was surprised by the Australian cruiser Sydney that had been told by wireless of her presence.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0006.xml
article
21
21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29
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The Making of a Submarine Mine
Firing an Electrical Mine
Mines Which Become Ineffective After a Certain Period
A Millinery Store on Water
A Sandstorm to Order
An Automobile Show Case
A Boy’s Wonderful Working Locomotive Model
How Savages Prepare Poisoned Arrows
Two-Year-Old Eggs.
Your Feet Are Wiped When You Enter Bohemian Bakeries
How Range Finders Find the Range
The Electromagnet in War
A Miner’s Safety Electric Lamp
Using an Automobile as a Winch
New Diver’s Suit Does Away with the Hand Pump
An Ancient Wooden Leg
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John Randolph Rexford
ORIGINALLY all forms of apparatus designed to explode under water to destroy ships were called torpedoes, but this term is now applied only to the well-known naval weapon. Submarine mines may be divided into three groups: 1. Buoyant mines having a constant depth of immersion.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0007.xml
article
30
30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55
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The Pigeon Spy and His Work in War
No Chance to Pass This Shop
An Illinois Community with Ideas in Street Lighting
Polite Sign Boards Bring Results.
Artificial Sausage Skins
Directing Artillery Fire from a Serbian Captive Balloon
The Wings of Death
Work and Play After the Battle is Over
Electricity in the Hospitals
In the War Hospitals for Horses
Done For
Secret Gasoline Supplies for Submarines
Jack Frost, at Least, Will Be Routed
The Doves of War
Odd Glimpses of the War
The Scepter of Britannia
Extremes of the War Transportation Problem
Unmilitary Phases of War
Salving Seven Thousand Dollars’ Worth of Death
Behind the Screens of Smoke and Sea
Not a Cliff Dwelling, But a Modern Trench
What War Means to Women
Mimicking the Ermine in War
An Indian Wedding Party
Curious Trades of Other Lands
A Jack-of-all-Trades Truck
Why a Woman Can Outtalk a Man
A Need for Electric Rickshaws
X-Ray Finds Safety Pin in Baby’s Throat
A Foot-controlled Sewing Machine
The foot still controls this sewing machine, but a motor does the real work
This open safety pin was extracted with a snare by the aid of the X-ray and a fluoroscope
Giving a Pear Tree New Roots
Fly Impaled by Spear of Grass
Hammering Spine to Cure Sick Heart
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ONE of the strangest phenomena of the war has been the revival during its course of methods and implements used in the warfares of medieval times and even of antiquity. We hear of slings and catapults for firing explosive bombs a short distance, of arrows shot from aeroplanes, of helmets, breastplates, and shields for the protection of the soldiers.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0008.xml
article
56
56,57,58,59
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A Three Million Dollar Automobile Scenic Highway
Oregon Built a Scenic Highway for Motorists
Cripple Makes a Fortune with Tri-Car; Then Runs for City Council
Gangway Life-Saver Prevents Crushing of Life Boats
A New Device for Recording Sounds
Loading Lifeboats Safely on the High Seas
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Fred W. Vincent
HIGH masonry walled roadways clinging to precipitous mountain sides and so cunningly built that no cement enters into their composition; bridges of solid concrete spanning deep mountain gorges, and tunnels through living rock are only a few of the features of the Columbia Highway, a two hundred mile three million dollar roadway that Oregon is rapidly driving through the heart of the Cascades and Coast Range mountains, down the Columbia River, from The Dalles to the Pacific Ocean.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0009.xml
article
60
60,61,62,63,64,65,66,67
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A Really Greater New York
An Engineer’s Plan to Make New York Bigger
Farming on a Precipice
Five Thousand Dollars a Minute.
Risking His Life to Make a Motion Picture Play
From Cellar to Sidewalk
A Clock Made of Straw
Shooting at Jupiter
Logging with Tractors in the Maine Woods
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Dr. T. Kennard Thomson
AT first glance, a project to reclaim fifty square miles of land from New York Bay, to add one hundred miles of new waterfront for docks, to fill in the East River, and to prepare New York for a population of twenty million, seems somewhat stupendous, does it not?
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0010.xml
article
68
68,69,70
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Mercury Poisoning and Deafness— The Price of a Derby Hat
Street Corner Directories That Tell You Everything
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A. M. Jungmann
WHEN you pay five dollars for your fine derby hat do not imagine you have paid the price of the hat. The real price is paid by the unfortunate victims of “hatters’ shakes" who contract mercurial poisoning while engaged in preparing the fur and making it into your hat.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0011.xml
article
71
71,72,73,74,75,76
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Band Concerts from an Electric Light Bulb
A Walking Leg Bath
Gliding Boat for Tropical River Mail Service
The Steam Engine in War
A Sleigh Motorcycle.
Keeping the Motorcycle Busy
Indicator Tells Pursuing Police Speed of Automobile
Where Men Are Still Cheaper Than Machinery.
Ingenious Slide Rule for Motorists
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George F. Worts
MUSIC that ranges from the piercing wail of a taut violin string to the grumbling bass of a monster horn has been added to the remarkable achievemnts of an electrical instrument so small and so insignificant in appearance that it could be passed by scores of times without arousing so much as a lingering glance.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0012.xml
article
77
77,78,79
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A Machine That Chews Money
How Gulls Help the Farmer
Motor Car Mows Railroad Weeds
Using the Sun’s Heat to Heat Water
Still Enough Coal
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FIVE million dollars a day in worn-out paper money was destroyed by machinery in the Treasury Department, at Washington, during the lash fiscal year. Two tons of this redeemed paper, amounting to over three hundred and fifty million bank notes, with a face value of more than a billion and a half dollars, passed through the macerating machinery, new money being issued to take the place of that which was destroyed.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0013.xml
article
80
80,81,82
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Hospital Work on the Firing Line
A Walking Dispensary
Immense Water Wheels Which Lift Their Own Water.
A Golf-Tee Fertilizer
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UNITED STATES field hospitals, the least understood divisional units in the United States army, have been newly equipped in order that they may be more mobile during battle. The field hospital service of our army, as it is constituted today, is one of the best in the world.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0014.xml
article
83
83,84,85,86,87,88,89
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Why There are Defective Babies and Monsters
Can Science Prevent Defectives?
Making Hens Lay Double Eggs
One-Eyed Animals and Men
Maude, the Motor Mule, on Our Cover
Nature’s Horde of Solid Silver.
A Real Sultan’s Strange Body-Guard
Was This the Tower of Babel?
Piles of Walnut Logs for Gun Stocks
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BOTH in Sinbad, the sailor, of Arabian Nights’ fame," and Homer’s Odyssey, there are narrated, strange tales of a monster with one eye in the middle of its head, who was so gigantic and so voracious that he ate two men for breakfast and two for supper, besides emptying three bowls of wine.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0015.xml
article
90
90,91,92,93,94
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The Death Toll of Our Misspent Aeronautic Appropriation
Photographs of the War
Hearing the Stones on a River’s Bed
Brightening the Baby’s Path
A Gasoline Field Kitchen
The Longest Pipe Line in America
Seeing Your "Hits" Half a Mile Away
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Eustace L. Adams
THE terrible and increasing mortality rate among our Army and Navy aviators is proportionately greater than in the flying corps of any large nation in the world in times of peace. Death after death among some of the finest officers in the Army and Navy seems to be necessary to shake the officials and people of the country into a realization of facts that have been repeatedly brought to their attention.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0016.xml
article
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95
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Saving Steps at Target Practice
An Electric Flat Iron Float.
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AN electrical target that signals the exact accuracy of the marksman to an indicator on the firing line has been installed on the shooting range of the United States marines at San Francisco, Calif. The method of signaling the accuracy of shots which is now employed on nearly all government ranges is not at all satisfactory, as it is difficult to convey to the man on the firing line the explicit information of the closeness of his shot to the bull’s eye.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0017.xml
article
96
96,97
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Monday Mechanics
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IN the good old days when the only way to wash clothing was. to carry it to the riverside and sop it up and down and rub it upon stones, there was good reason for calling the first work day of the week blue or drab or even black. To-day, however, fortunate home laundresses have at their disposal excellent mechanical helpers.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0018.xml
article
98
98,99,100,101
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Motor Car Bodies of 1916— Good and Bad
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John Jay Ide
THE average American automobile manufacturer has finally grasped some of the essentials of streamline form as far as open bodies are concerned. There are now only a few makers who cling to such features as the wide radiator, straight-sided hood and bulging cowl, low body sides affording little protection to the occupants, and upholstery protuding above the top rail.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0019.xml
article
102
102,103,104,105,106,107,108
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Building With Cobblestones
Electric Heater Resembles Desk Telephone
Adapting Tire Inflation to the Load
A Hog-Pen That Counts Hogs
Erasing Attachment for Typewriters
Soda Fountain in a Suitcase
A Finger-Knife for Egyptian Corn
A Tub Within a Tub for the Baby
Preventing the Clogging of the Sink
A Saucepan Which Is Also a Strainer
A Tea Kettle Which Does Not Burn
A Garbage Can Which Cannot Spill
Combining a Brush and a Suction Pump in a Cleaner
Simple Way to Clean Vegetables
A Collapsible Wardrobe
Bottle Corks Made From Blood.
A Meat Chopper Which Opens Like a Book
A Spanish Lesson in Aeronautics
Ice Cannot Fall Out of This Water Pitcher
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COBBLESTONES combined with cement are used extensively in the West for all kinds of ornamental and utilitarian construction. From ornamental urns and corner markers to fountains, bandstands, bridges and even such large structures as two-story houses, churches and even an observatory, may all be found in California, built of the cobbles that are removed in clearing.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0020.xml
article
109
109,110,111,112
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Winter Uses for the Electric Fan
Electric Toaster Eliminates Burnt Fingers
Don’t Decarbonize Aluminum Pistons
Foiling the Safe Blower
This Can-opener Cannot Slip
A Feed Hopper for Chickens.
Left-handed Watches for Left Handed People
An International Test for Vision
A Pocket Periscope
A Trolley for the Stable Lamp
Non-Rolling Nursing Bottle
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HAVE you ever thought of the various uses to which the electric fan in your home can be placed other than lowering the temperature and making it comfortable in the room when the thermometer is high outside? How really indispensable it is in innumerable ways, and how much it does in preserving health in the home by keeping the rooms cool and fresh?
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0021.xml
article
113
113,114
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The Home Craftsman
An Extra Drainboard for the Kitchen Sink
To Lengthen the Life of a Necktie
Wood Box Arrangement Saves Many Steps from the Dining Room
Broom Closet Utilizing Waste Space
A Cheap Septic Tank
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A SUPPLEMENTARY drainboard combined with a handy utensil cabinet can be attached to a kitchen sink which has only one inadequate drainboard. One end of the new drainboard rests upon the edge of the sink, while the other is supported by legs constructed as shown in the accompanying drawing.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0022.xml
article
115
115,116,117,118,119,120,121,122
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A Craftsman Desk Chair
A Serviceable Hot Water Heater Which Can be Made at Home
How a Course Dinner Can be Served Without a Maid
Connecting Block for Bell Wires
Ink Erasing Blotter
An Electric Alarm Clock
A Fuel Economizer
Helping to Kindle Fire Wood
A Remedy for Sagging Doors
Pouring from Lipless Jars.
Waste Heat Warms Water
Hints on Running the Home Furnace
Distilling Water for the Household
Making an Electric Toaster
A Home-made Paper Baler
Serving Table Attached to Range
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Ralph F. Windoes
IN the October issue of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, the author presented a craftsman desk table. The chair herein described is its companion piece, but it would serve equally as well as a dining or an occasional chair. The mill-bill for this chair is as follows, all pieces to be planed and sandpapered to exact dimensions at the mill.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0023.xml
article
123
123,124,125,126,127,128
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For Practical Workers
A Radium Lightning Rod
A Glue Scraper
An Emergency Hack Saw
Differential Gear for Home-Made Tractors and Cycle-Cars
A Useful Home-Made Glue Brush
An Effective Window Lock
To Make Small Springs
How to Case Harden Iron
Files and Tools from Switch Handles
A Handle for a Small Bit or Drill
An Easily Made Marking Gauge
Home-Made Drill Press
How to Get the Most From a Football
A Help in Wire-Twisting
Ground Detector for Three Wire Circuit
Ingenious Circuit Saves Money in Photoplay Houses
A Novel Medical Battery
A Combined Triangle and Protractor
A Drawing Cutter
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Lucien Fournier
A LIGHTNING ROD does not prevent t-he occurrence of lightning. It even provokes it, but suppresses its incendiary effects. Such, indeed, is its chief object. May we not increase its efficacy in this direction? The problem is an interesting one.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0024.xml
article
129
129,130,131,132,133,134,135,136,137,138,139,140
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Overhauling Your Car for the Winter
Valve Grinding Process
Valve Grinding Processes
Piston Troubles
Removing Pistons Stuck in Combustion Chamber
Inspection and Refitting of Engine Bearings
Adjusting Main Bearings
Scraping Brasses to Fit
Remetalling and Fitting the Connecting Rods
Precautions in Reassembling Parts
To Make a Work Bench and Vise
A Sprinkling Can as a Dark Room Lamp
An Adjustable Arc Lamp
Adjustable Printing-Frame Holder
Alcohol Burner
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ONE of the most important parts of the gasoline engine and one that requires frequent inspection and refitting to keep in condition is the mushroom or poppet valve that controls the inlet and exhaust gas flow. In overhauling it is essential that these valves be removed from their seatings and examined carefully for various defects which will be enumerated at proper time.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0025.xml
article
141
141,142
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How to Build an Ice-Boat
How to Draw an Ellipse
A Doorstep Burglar Alarm
A Simple Laboratory Burner
Waterproofing Shoes
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THE ice-boat described is fast for its size, and can be built at a small cost. It has a sail area of about 70 sq. ft.— enough to carry two people. Good lumber should be used, such as bass wood or white pine, and the weight should be kept as low as possible.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0026.xml
article
143
143,144,145,146
RADIO SECTION
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Impedance of Oscillation Circuits in Wireless Telegraphy
Devoted to the Encouragement of Amateurs and Experimenters in the Field of Radio Communication
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John Vincent
IN last month’s article it was shown that every antenna had a particular natural wave-length, or fundamental wavelength, which it would radiate if it were excited electrically and then left to oscillate. It was pointed out that this natural wavelength depended upon the capacity and inductance of the aerial, and that these in turn depended upon the total length of the antenna-to-ground system.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0027.xml
article
146
146,147,148,149
RADIO SECTION
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Recent Radio Inventions
A Multiple Point Switch
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A. F. Jackson
A patent issued during 1915 to C. D. Ainsworth and bearing number 1,145,735 shows an interesting arrangement of three-electrode vacuum-tube detector. Fig. I indicates the construction of the device and the circuit, connections. Referring to this drawing, within an evacuated glass bulb I is sealed a support 8 which carries a tubular anode 2 and two electrodes 4 and 6, also in the form of tubes and concentric with the central conductor.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0028.xml
article
150
150,151,152
RADIO SECTION
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Radio Stations in Alaska
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Vincent I. Kraft
RADIO communication plays an important role in Alaska. Many cities and towns which would otherwise be isolated are kept in touch with the rest of the civilized world by this agency alone, and the United States Government employs it to communicate with government vessels in North Pacific waters, and to receive the weather reports from all parts of the northland.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0029.xml
article
153
153,154
RADIO SECTION
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New Books on Radio Subjects
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THIS book, by the professor of physics and electrical engineering at the Municipal Technical Institute, Belfast, Ireland, is intended to furnish a proper introduction to the technical problems of radio signaling. The common fault of assuming on the part of the student either on extended knowledge of electrical theory or an interest in long mathematical discussions has been avoided.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0030.xml
article
154
154
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Radio Club News
Schenectady Radio Association
Cincinnati School Radio Society
Bronx Radio Club
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THE Schenectady Radio Association, which was formerly known as the Amateur Wireless Association, held its annual election of officers in September, with results as follows: R. Denham, president; H. Vogel, vice-president; L. Pohlman, secretary; S. Dodd, assistant secretary; E. Kurth, treasurer, and A. LeTarte, librarian.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0031.xml
article
155
155,156
RADIO SECTION
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What Radio Readers Want to Know
Increasing an Umbrella Aerial.
Radio Receiver Information.
Receiving Set For Amateurs.
Radio Abbreviations.
Loose Couplers and Stranded Copper.
Trouble With a Half Kilo-Watt Transformer.
Some Miscellaneous Information.
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C. A. P., Fresno, Cal., asks: Q. 1. Would it be advisable to add 2,000' of wire to my umbrella aerial? A. 1. If you add the wire so as to make the length of the antenna greater it will be advisable to add the amount of wire you mention. It would be better if you could arrange so as to have this wire extend 300 or 400 feet out from the pole.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0032.xml
article
157
157
RADIO SECTION
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Radio Construction Notes
A New Aerial Supporter
Sketch and construction of a steady aerial supporter
A Simple Change-Over Switch
Connection diagrams for ordinary switch used as change-over
A Condenser’s Power
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AMATEURS having high masts are • often troubled by having their hoisting ropes shrink in wet weather. A remedy which also prevents the spreader from tilting is shown herewith. Referring to the sketch, piece A is of ⅛inch strap iron, ½-inch wide and 2 feet 4 inches long.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0033.xml
article
158
158,159,160
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What’s New in Patents
Baby’s Bottle-Holder
Tool for Stripping Insulation
Electrically Lighted Pencil
Combined Door Bell and Mail Receiver
An Aid to the Veterinary
A Room Stove Water Heater
Sanitary Kneading Board
Self-Feeding Soldering Iron
A Pad and Pencil Holder for the Telephone
Folding Tooth Brush
Apparatus For Cleaning Hair Brushes
Combination Sad-Iron Heater and Cooking Utensil
Shoe Polishing Device
Opening and Closing Garbage Cans with the Foot
Purse In Palm of Glove
Anti-Skidding Chain
Walking Stick Becomes a Seat
Meat-Holder Which Makes Slicing Easy
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AN adjustable arm is designed to be affixed to an infant’s crib or cradle. Attached to the end of this arm is a device for holding a nursing bottle. A bottle is placed in the clamp and its position may be readily fixed and adjusted. This device allows the feeding of an infant without the presence of the mother or nurse.
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0034.xml