Issue: 19150301

Monday, March 1, 1915
MARCH, 1915
3
True
86
Friday, December 12, 2014

Articles
cover
209
209
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19150301_0086_003_0001.xml
article
209
209,210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,221,222
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ASTRONOMY ON THE PACIFIC COAST
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PROFESSOR BUSSELL TRACY CRAWFORD
THIS subject brings instantly to the mind's eye the Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton, and the Solar Observatory on Mount Wilson, as they are two of the greatest astronomical observatories in the world, and probably the best generally known of all.
PopularScience_19150301_0086_003_0002.xml
article
223
223,224,225,226,227,228,229,230,231,232
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THE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORIES OF THE PACIFIC COAST
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PROFESSOR WM. E. RITTER
THE study of marine botany and zoology has gained a foothold on the Pacific coast of the United States in the brief period during which biology has been institutionally naturalized in this part of the world, that promises well for the future.
PopularScience_19150301_0086_003_0003.xml
article
233
233,234,235,236,237,238,239,240,241,242,243,244
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THE LAST WILD TRIBE OF CALIFORNIA
The Yahi Tribe
The Mill Creek “War”
Hidden Life of the Survivors
The Breaking Up of the Hidden Village
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PROFESSOR T. T. WATERMAN
IN the fall of 1908 some attention was aroused in the press by a story to the effect that hunters had encountered in the state of California a tribe of Indians who were still in the stone age. The idea of a "wild" tribe in a thickly settled region like California was so novel that it served to awaken a very wide interest.
PopularScience_19150301_0086_003_0004.xml
article
245
245,246,247,248,249,250,251,252,253,254,255,256,257,258,259,260,261,262,263,264
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EXTINCT FAUNAS OF THE MOHAVE DESERT, THEIR SIGNIFICANCE IN A STUDY OF THE ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF LIFE IN AMERICA
INTRODUCTION
THE MOHAVE DESERT OF TO-DAY
GEOLOGIC OCCURRENCE AND AGE OE THE MOHAVE FOSSIL BEDS
THE OLDEST KNOWN MAMMAL FAUNA OF THE MOHAVE, THE UPPER MIOCENE OF BARSTOW
THE SECOND FAUNA, THE RICARDO PLIOCENE
THE LATEST EXTINCT FAUNA OF THE MOHAVE, THE MANIX PLEISTOCENE
COMPARATIVE TABLE SHOWING KNOWN HISTORY OF THE MAMMALIAN FAUNAS IN THE MOHAVE AREA.
SIGNIFICANCE OF THE FAUNAL SUCCESSION IN THE MOHAVE
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PEOFESSOR JOHN C. MERRIAM
IT is almost a rule that features of the natural world which have exerted an unusual influence in developing our emotional, poetic and religious natures, when brought within the range of scientific inquiry seem only more deeply to excite our wonder and respect.
PopularScience_19150301_0086_003_0005.xml
article
265
265,266,267,268,269
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INSECTS OF THE PACIFIC
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PROFESSOR VERNON L. KELLOGG
WHEN one speaks of the insects of the Pacific, they are the insects of the Pacific shores and Pacific islands that one refers to. For with all the amazing adaptiveness of insects to variety of habitat and habit, and with all the pressure of enormous numbers of species and individuals to drive them far and farther and into all the available places of earth, the insects have, curiously, so far not invaded the oceans.
PopularScience_19150301_0086_003_0006.xml
article
270
270,271,272,273
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THE PHYSIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE BOTANIST
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PROFESSOR GEORGE J. PEIRCE
IT is almost absurd to speak under one title of a region which forms the Pacific coast of the United States for a distance equal to that from Key West to New York, which extends from sea-level to almost three times the height of Mt. Washington and from the Pacific eastward as far as Utica lies from the Atlantic.
PopularScience_19150301_0086_003_0007.xml
article
274
274,275,276,277,278,279,280,281,282,283,284,285,286,287,288,289
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SOCIAL LEGISLATION ON THE PACIFIC COAST
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PROFESSOR WILLIAM F. OGBURN
THE Pacific coast states represent a future empire. Nature has marked them off by natural barriers and by climate more distinctly than any other division of the United States. This fact so impressed the distinguished author of the "American Commonwealth" that he speculated upon the development of a Pacific coast type of the human race and pointed out that this region might quite naturally have been the home of a separate nation.
PopularScience_19150301_0086_003_0008.xml
article
290
290,291,292,293,294,295,296,297,298,299,300,301,302,303,304,305,306
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THE VOLCANIC ACTIVITY OF LASSEN PEAK, CALIFORNIA
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PROFESSOR RULIFF S. HOLWAY
NOTWITHSTANDING vague reports of early settlers it now seems practically certain that no white man had witnessed an eruption of a volcano within the limits of California until May 30, 1914. On that day Lassen Peak, a well-known old volcanic cone in the northern part of the state situated about seventy-five miles southeasterly from Mt. Shasta, suddenly burst into explosive action.
PopularScience_19150301_0086_003_0009.xml
article
307
307,308,309,310,311,312,313,314
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
SCIENCE ON THE PACIFIC COAST
THE PACIFIC DIVISION OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE
THE SAN FRANCISCO MEETING OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE
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PROGRESS in science has always been controlled by circumstance. Had Harvey possessed the microscope that a few years after his demonstration of the circulation of the blood Malpighi was applying with distinguished success to the investigation of anatomical problems, he would not have failed to see the capillary network that escaped his unaided eye.
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