Issue: 19141101

Sunday, November 1, 1914
NOVEMBER, 1914
5
True
85
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
417
417
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19141101_0085_005_0001.xml
article
417
417,418,419,420,421,422,423,424
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TREE DISTRIBUTION IN CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
Quercus lobata
Quercus agrifolia
Quercus Douglasii
ROOT VARIATION
GROUND WATER
THE RELATION OF GROUND WATER TO FOREST DISTRIBUTION
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DR. W. A. CANNON
IT has frequently been observed that the shrubs in dry regions occur isolated from one another, with the effect that the landscape as a whole has a spotted appearance. This in certain regions is very striking. For example, on drainage slopes or bajadas of the mountains of southern Arizona or southern California, one sees a discontinuous vegetal covering, conveying the idea that there are more plants than is actually the case.
PopularScience_19141101_0085_005_0002.xml
article
425
425,426,427,428,429,430,431,432,433,434,435,436,437,438,439,440,441,442
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PHENOMENA OF INHERITANCE
II. MODIFICATIONS AND EXTENSIONS OF MENDELIAN PRINCIPLES
Inheritance Factors and Germinal Units
Sex and Sex-limited Inheritance
Sex-linked Inheritance
Blending Inheritance
III. MENDELIAN INHERITANCE IN MAN
MENDELIAN INHERITANCE IN MAN
SUMMARY
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PROFESSOR EDWIN GRANT CONKLIN
IT is a common experience that natural phenomena are found to be more complex the more thoroughly they are investigated. Nature is always greater than our theories, and with few exceptions hypotheses which were satisfactory at one stage of knowledge have to be extended, modified or abandoned as knowledge increases.
PopularScience_19141101_0085_005_0003.xml
article
443
443,444,445,446,447,448,449,450,451,452,453,454,455,456
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RUBBER: WILD, PLANTATION AND SYNTHETIC
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DR. JOHN WADDELL
AN industry can not be wholly uninteresting which involves the consumption yearly of about $250,000,000 worth of raw material in the production of goods worth $750,000,000 which has grown to nearly double its size in seven years, which involves the cultivation of three quarters of a million acres or more of land, worth about $130 an acre, but half of which has during a boom been capitalized at double its value, an industry whose center will be speedily shifted from the banks of the Amazon, half way round the world, to Ceylon and the Malay States, unless very heroic measures are taken to prevent it, among which heroic measures the importation of 50,000 Chinese coolies into the Amazon valley has been suggested.
PopularScience_19141101_0085_005_0004.xml
article
457
457,458,459,460,461,462
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RECENT MATHEMATICAL ACTIVITIES
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PROFESSOR G. A. MILLER
MATHEMATICAL research generally thrives best in seclusion. The results are often embodied in a language which but few understand, and are then stored with a quietude secured and maintained by their own attributes. Now and then there are instances when unsolved mathematical questions get involved with enough external matter to attract general attention.
PopularScience_19141101_0085_005_0005.xml
article
463
463,464,465,466
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THE ULTRA-SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL
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B. HOROWITZ
THE addresses before the British Association for the Advancement of Science by Schäfer and Lodge have surely had the effect of stimulating still further our interest in the problem of problems—the origin of life. That the most profound differences of opinion exist not merely between scientists and non-scientists, but among scientific men themselves, adds but another factor to the general interest in the subject, though many factors to the general confusion.
PopularScience_19141101_0085_005_0006.xml
article
467
467,468,469,470,471,472,473,474,475
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ARABIAN AND MEDIEVAL SURGERY1
REFERENCES
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DR. JOHN FOOTE
AFTER the conquest of Alexandria, when the victorious Mohammedans were feeding the fires of the city baths with the priceless treasures of the Alexandrian library, a young man who had been a student at the now dismantled university was writing a medical work, the sixth volume of which dealt with surgery.
PopularScience_19141101_0085_005_0007.xml
article
476
476,477,478,479,480,481,482,483,484,485,486
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CIVILIZATION AS A SELECTIVE AGENCY
II
III
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ROLAND HUGINS
WRITERS of recent years appear to agree that there has been little or no improvement of civilized man through selection. Since the dawn of history, it is recognized that many selective forces, some favorable, some deleterious, have acted on the human breed; but it is denied that any constant and effective agency which would bring about a marked advance in moral and intellectual quality has been in operation.
PopularScience_19141101_0085_005_0008.xml
article
487
487,488,489,490,491,492,493,494,495,496,497,498,499,500,501,502,503
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EPHEMERAL LABOR MOVEMENTS, 1866-1889
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DR. FRANK T. CARLTON
THE history of labor organizations (1866-1889) is a record of ebb and flow, agitation, organization and disintegration. It is, indeed, a strange blend of unionism and politics, of individualism and socialism, of strikes, greenbackism and cooperation, of prosperity, panics and concentration of industry.
PopularScience_19141101_0085_005_0009.xml
article
504
504,505,506,507,508,509,510,511,512,513,514,515
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THE SCIENCE OF EDUCATION1
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RROFESSOR JOHN PERRY
I WANT you to understand that we have established some fundamental principles in our science: (1) A subject must interest a pupil. (2) A man who trains dogs or seals or bears or other animals makes a close study of their minds. In the same way we must recognize that one boy differs from another, and study the mind of each boy.
PopularScience_19141101_0085_005_0010.xml
article
516
516,517,518,519,520,521,522
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
SCIENCE AND THE WAR
THE DISTRIBUTION OF SCIENTIFIC MEN AMONG THE DIFFERENT NATIONS
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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ONE of the most serious aspects of the war is the diversion from scientific work which it involves. Should the contributions to pure and applied science in the course of the next ten years be reduced to one half, the loss to the world in life and wealth would be far greater than that caused directly by the destruction of war.
PopularScience_19141101_0085_005_0011.xml