Issue: 19141001

Thursday, October 1, 1914
OCTOBER, 1914
4
True
85
Thursday, December 18, 2014

Articles
cover
313
313
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19141001_0085_004_0001.xml
article
313
313,314,315,316,317,318,319,320,321,322,323,324,325,326,327,328,329,330,331,332,333,334,335,336,337
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PHENOMENA OF INHERITANCE1
A. OBSERVATIONS OF INHERITANCE
INDIVIDUALS AND THEIR CHARACTERS
HEREDITARY RESEMBLANCES AND DIFFERENCES
I. Hereditary Resemblances
II. Hereditary Differences
B. STATISTICAL STUDY OF INHERITANCE
1. The Law of Ancestral Inheritance which he stated as follows:
C. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF INHERITANCE
I. Mendelism
Other Mendelian Ratios
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PROFESSOR EDWIN G. CONKLIN
THE observations of men in all ages have established the fact that in general “like produces like,” and that, in spite of many exceptions, children are in their main characteristics like their parents. And yet offspring are never exactly like their parents, and this has led to the saying that “like does not produce like but only somewhat like.”
PopularScience_19141001_0085_004_0002.xml
article
338
338,339,340,341,342,343,344,345,346,347,348,349,350,351,352,353,354,355,356,357,358,359,360,361
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THE CONIFEROUS FORESTS OF EASTERN NORTH AMERICA
THE FOREST TYPES IN DETAIL
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DR. ROLAND M. HARPER
IN eastern North America about thirty species of coniferous trees make up at least two thirds of the existing forest, while the remainder comprises something like 250 hardwood or broad-leaved species. About 70 per cent. of the lumber sawed in the eastern United States at the present time is of conifers or softwoods, and if the statistics for eastern Canada and for fuel, pulp-wood, cross-ties, poles, etc., were included the preponderance of softwood in the area under consideration would be still more evident.
PopularScience_19141001_0085_004_0003.xml
article
362
362,363,364,365,366,367,368,369,370,371,372,373,374,375,376
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THE VALUE OF RESEARCH IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NATIONAL HEALTH1
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PROFESSOR BENJAMIN MOORE
THE history of medical science presents to the curious student a remarkable development commencing in the latter half of the nineteenth century, and one worthy of special study, both on account of the light that it sheds on the present position and the illumination it affords for future progress.
PopularScience_19141001_0085_004_0004.xml
article
377
377,378,379,380,381,382,383,384,385,386,387,388,389,390,391
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THE CULTIVATION OF WASTE LAND1
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A. D. HALL
THE president of a Section of the British Association has two very distinct precedents before him for his address; he can either set about a general review of the whole subject to which his section is devoted or he can give an account of one of his own investigations which he judges to be of wider interest and application than usual.
PopularScience_19141001_0085_004_0005.xml
article
392
392,393,394,395,396
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HOME RULE THE HOPE OF MUNICIPAL DEMOCRACY
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OSWALD RYAN
IF the final test of democracy in America is to come in the cities, as Jefferson phophesied in his “Notes on Virginia,” it would seem that the test should at least be a fair one. Yet the municipal machinery of the average American state permits anything but a fair trial of the democratic principle.
PopularScience_19141001_0085_004_0006.xml
article
397
397,398,399,400,401,402,403
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THE POLITICAL MIND OF FOREIGN-BORN AMERICANS
HIGHEST FOR HEARST CANDIDATE
LOWEST FOR HEARST CANDIDATES
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ABRAM LIPSKY
AN election is a psychological experiment on a large scale. The trouble with most elections, however, as psychological tests, is that the questions submitted are vague, complex and variously understood. If one could put a simple and unequivocal question such as “Are you in favor of capital punishment?” or, “Do you prefer cooperative to family housekeeping?” the answers might be of great informative value as to the mind of the population.
PopularScience_19141001_0085_004_0007.xml
article
404
404,405,406,407,408,409,410,411
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THE EVOLUTION OF SERVICE BY UNION AND COOPERATION, CONSERVATION AND EXCHANGE
PART I
I. Evolution and the Conduct of Life
II. The Mosaic Vision of Science
III. Tragic, Cooperative, and Benevolent Nature
IV. Creation, Evolution and Service
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PROFESSOR WILLIAM PATTEN
THE specialist, who has wandered far into the wilderness of created things, seeking the solution of his problem at its source, must pause now and again to note the location of the sun and the direction in which the streams are flowing. Having done so, he well may greet his distant colleagues and send a field-note of progress to his friends at home.
PopularScience_19141001_0085_004_0008.xml
article
412
412,413,414,415,416,417,418
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE ADDEESS OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE
A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF A DESERT BASIN
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in Canada, in South Africa and now in Australia exhibits those national traits which led to the founding and development of these dominions, and year after year the president of the association represents the leadership in science which the British races have so continuously maintained since the time of Roger Bacon.
PopularScience_19141001_0085_004_0009.xml