Issue: 19140901

Tuesday, September 1, 1914
SEPTEMBER, 1914
3
True
85
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
209
209
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0001.xml
article
209
209,210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,221,222,223,224,225,226,227,228,229,230,231
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AN EXPEDITION TO THE CORAL REEFS OF TORRES STRAITS
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ALFRED GOLDSBOROUGH MAYER
EARLY in September, 1913, the expedition of the Department of Marine Biology of the Carnegie Institution of Washington arrived at Thursday Island in Torres Straits off the northern end of Cape York. Thursday Island owing to the deep water in its vicinity has grown to be a busy port of call, although it is barely a mile in length and is so completely surrounded by the larger members of the archipelago that only the most detailed British Admiralty charts records its name, and even the painstaking Captain Cook who first sailed past it in the “Endeavour” in 1770, merely notes it as one of the Prince of Wales Islands.
PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0002.xml
article
232
232,233,234,235,236,237,238,239,240,241,242,243,244,245,246
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THE CELLULAR BASIS OF HEREDITY AND DEVELOPMENT. II
C. THE MECHANISM OF HEREDITY
I. The Specificity of Germ Cells
II. Correlations Between Germinal and Somatic Organization
1. Nuclear Correlations
2. Cytoplasmic Correspondences
(a) Polarity
(b) Symmetry
(c) Inverse Symmetry
(d) Localization Pattern
D. THE MECHANISM OF DEVELOPMENT
1. The Formation of Different Substances in Cells
2. Segregation and Isolation of Different Substances in Cells
(a) Differential and Non-differential Cell Division
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PROFESSOR EDWIN GRANT CONKLIN
The mechanism of heredity, as contrasted with the mechanism of development, consists in the formation of particular kinds of germ cells and in the union of certain of these cells in fertilization. We have briefly traced the origin, maturation and union of male and female sex cells in a number of animals, and in these phenomena we have the mechanism of the hereditary continuity between successive generations.
PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0003.xml
article
247
247,248,249,250,251,252,253,254,255,256,257,258,259
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THE DECREASING POPULATION OF FRANCE
I. THE PRESENT STATUS OF THE POPULATION
II. CAUSES
III. PROPOSED REMEDIES
IV. CONCLUSIONS
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PROFESSOR JAMES W. GARNER
ONE of the leading newspapers of France, in an editorial in February, 1912, declared that the day on which the results of the next quinquennial census were known would be one of national mourning for the people of France. The Parisian journals in commenting on the census returns when they were made public in May, 1912, characterized the conditions which they revealed by such terms as “deplorable," "profoundly desolating," "extremely disquieting," "lamentable" and "dolorous."
PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0004.xml
article
260
260,261,262,263,264,265,266,267,268,269
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THE RISE OF A NEW PEOFESSION
THE AGE OF THE PIONEER
THE AGE OF MECHANISM
THE AGE OF ADMINISTRATION
SELF—MADE MEN
NEW CONDITIONS
ADMINISTRATIVE HELPS
THE PROFESSIONAL ADMINISTRATOR
TRANSITIONAL DIFFICULTIES
WHENCE THE SUPPLY WILL COME
NEW CONCEPTIONS
THE FELLOWSHIP OF ADMINISTRATORS
THE OUTLOOK
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PROFESSOR EDWARD D. JONES
IF we consider the industrial history of the United States, for the span of a long generation, dating backward from this year of grace to about 1840, we can distinguish at least three great movements which have occupied the minds of men in industry.
PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0005.xml
article
270
270,271,272,273,274,275,276,277,278,279,280,281,282,283
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THE PICTURE AND THE TEXT
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PROFESSOR ROBERT MACDOUGALL
THE place of illustration in book-making is found to vary through a wide range of values as one reviews a series of volumes at hap-hazard. In some the pages are flooded with pictures, from thumb-nail sketches on the margins to full-page prints in the natural colors of the original; in others page succeeds page in unbroken letter-press, without an illustration from cover to cover.
PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0006.xml
article
284
284,285,286,287,288,289,290,291
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DETERMINING EDUCATIONAL VALUES
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PROFESSOR M. V. O'SHEA
IT will probably not be questioned by any one that the most complex business society can undertake is to train the rising generation effectively. The human mind is an extremely complicated thing. It is so intricate, indeed, that it has been found impossible thus far to discern many of the laws according to which it evolves and functions.
PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0007.xml
article
292
292,293,294,295
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THE PARADOX OF THE EAST WIND
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PROFESSOR ALEXANDER McADIE
ABOUT ten miles south of Boston, on the highest land within sight of the sea from Maine to Florida, is a well-known meteorological observatory, founded some thirty years ago by a young graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0008.xml
article
296
296,297,298
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WAR AND PEACE
A LEAGUE OF PEACE
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THE futility of war as a means of producing peace between nations has often been dwelt upon. It is really the most futile of all remedies, because it embitters contestants and sows the seeds of future struggles. Generations are sometimes required to eradicate the hostility engendered by one conflict.
PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0009.xml
article
298
298,299,300,301
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THE MORAL EQUIVALENT OF WAR
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HAVING said thus much in preparation, I will now confess my own utopia. I devoutly believe in the reign of peace and in the gradual advent of some sort of a socialistic equilibrium. The fatalistic view of the war-function is to me nonsense, for I know that war-making is due to definite motives and subject to prudential checks and reasonable criticisms, just like any other form of enterprise.
PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0010.xml
article
301
301,302,303,304
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WAR AND MANHOOD
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THOSE who fall in war are the young men of the nations, the men between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five, without blemish so far as may be—the men of courage, alertness, dash and recklessness, the men who value their lives as naught in the service of the nation.
PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0011.xml
article
304
304,305,306,307
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SCIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL GOOD WILL
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SCIENCE with its applications has been one of the principal factors leading to peace and international good will. Science, democracy and the limitation of warfare are the great achievements of modern civilization. They have advanced together almost continuously from the beginnings of the universities of Bologna, Paris and Oxford in the twelfth century to their great triumphs in the nineteenth century and the present promise of their complete supremacy.
PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0012.xml
article
308
308,309,310,311,312,313,314
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE MAD WAR
THE RACES OF THE EUROPEAN NATIONS AND THEIR NATURAL INCREASE
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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AN obscure French war of the fifteenth century is known to historians as the guerre folle, but no carnage so well deserves to be called the "mad war” as the international slaughter now raging in Europe. There existed an inevitable conflict of inherited memories between Germany and France, an inevitable commercial conflict between Germany and Great Britain, an inevitable racial conflict between Teutons and Slavs.
PopularScience_19140901_0085_003_0013.xml