Issue: 19140601

Monday, June 1, 1914
JUNE, 1914
6
True
84
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Articles
cover
521
521
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19140601_0084_006_0001.xml
article
521
521,522,523,524,525,526,527,528,529,530,531,532,533,534,535,536,537
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FACTS AND FACTORS OF DEVELOPMENT
INTRODUCTION
PHENOMENA OF DEVELOPMENT
I. DEVELOPMENT OF THE BODY
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EDWIN GRANT CONKLIN
ONE of the greatest results of the doctrine of organic evolution has been the determination of man’s place in nature. For many centuries it has been known that in bodily structures man is an animal —that he is born, nourished and developed, that he matures, reproduces and dies just as does the humblest animal or plant.
PopularScience_19140601_0084_006_0002.xml
article
538
538,539,540,541,542,543,544,545,546,547,548,549,550
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THE STRUGGLE FOR EQUALITY IN THE UNITED STATES
THE CURRENT TREND OF AFFAIRS
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CHARLES F. EMERICK
NO one in this generation has expressed the idealism of the American people as well as Mr. Roosevelt in his best moments. Speaking at Jamestown, Virginia, he said: The corner stone of the Republic lies in our treating each man on his worth as a man, paying no heed to his creed, his birthplace or his occupation, asking not whether he is rich or poor, whether he labors with head or hand; asking only whether he acts decently and honorably in the various relations of his life, whether he behaves well to his family, to his neighbors, to the state.
PopularScience_19140601_0084_006_0003.xml
article
551
551,552,553,554,555,556,557,558,559,560,561,562,563,564,565,566
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THE FUTURE OF THE CHESTNUT TREE IN NORTH AMERICA
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PROFESSOR ARTHUR H. GRAVES
NOW-A-DAYS one often hears the question, “What is going to become of our chestnut trees?” In fact, whenever the subject of trees is broached in the course of a conversation, this inquiry is bound to come out—not, as I believe, that the interrogator hopes to receive a satisfactory answer, but more in the way of a general query.
PopularScience_19140601_0084_006_0004.xml
article
567
567,568,569,570,571,572,573,574,575,576,577,578
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CLAUDE BERNARD
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D. WRIGHT WILSON
ONE hundred years ago, in a little village in eastern France, there was born of humble parentage a man who was to become one of the greatest physiologists of France and of the world. Though a pioneer in a field despised and looked down upon at the time, he was to make discoveries which were of fundamental importance to physiology and medicine and were to influence the whole general aspect of biology toward certain questions.
PopularScience_19140601_0084_006_0005.xml
article
579
579,580,581,582,583,584,585,586,587,588,589
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THE GENERAL PHYSICO-CHEMICAL CONDITIONS OF STIMULATION IN LIVING ORGANISMS
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RALPH S. LILLIE
IT is customary to say that irritability, or the capability of responding to stimuli, is an essential characteristic of living beings. Whether this is true or not of the lowest organisms—certain bacteria or the filterable viruses—there is no doubt that it is preeminently so of the higher, and especially of those leading free and active lives, like most animals.
PopularScience_19140601_0084_006_0006.xml
article
590
590,591,592,593,594,595,596,597,598,599,600,601,602,603,604
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THE PSYCHOLOGY OF RELAXATION
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PROFESSOR G. T. W. PATRICK
THE gospel of relaxation has been eloquently preached to us by Professor James, Annie Payson Call and others. We have been told that we live under too much stress and tension, that we are too intense and carry too much expression in our faces, that we must relax, let go, unburden ourselves of many useless contractions.
PopularScience_19140601_0084_006_0007.xml
article
605
605,606,607,608
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THE NEED FOR A SALARIED MEDICAL PROFESSION
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PROFESSOR PAUL L. VOGT
THE state, in the interest of its own preservation and progress, has assumed control of certain activities closely affecting the life of every citizen. Among these are the care of the public roads, the distribution of the mails and the education of the youth.
PopularScience_19140601_0084_006_0008.xml
article
609
609,610,611,612,613,614
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IS THE MONTESSORI METHOD A FAD?
PROFESSOR OF THE HISTORY OF EDUCATION IN THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA
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FRANK PIERREPONT GRAVES
AFTER all the popular excitement, spectacular magazine articles, and more or less interesting books on the subject, the busy man— even the educator—is still asking: “What is the Montessori Method ?” Is it a wonderful discovery of educational principles, an ingenious invention of material and devices, or merely a new fad that has been exalted by manufacturers of educational apparatus and enterprising journalists into a profitable cult and propaganda?
PopularScience_19140601_0084_006_0009.xml
article
615
615,616,617,618,619,620
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
RUTHERFORD ON THE CONSTITUTION OF MATTER
THE STRUCTURE OF THE ATOM
THE SMALL COLLEGE AND ITS PRESIDENT
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE most notable features of the annual meeting of the National Academy of Sciences held in Washington in the third week of April were two lectures by Sir Ernest Rutherford, the distinguished physicist of the University of Manchester.
PopularScience_19140601_0084_006_0010.xml
advertisement
621
621,622,623,624,625,626
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19140601_0084_006_0011.xml