Issue: 19131101

Saturday, November 1, 1913
NOVEMBER, 1913
5
True
83
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Articles
cover
417
417
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19131101_0083_005_0001.xml
article
417
417,418,419,420,421,422,423,424,425,426,427
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THE HISTORY OF DIETETICS
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JOHN BENJAMIN NICHOLS
THE manifold diversities in diet, the articles employed as food, the manner of preparing food, customs of eating, etc., among different peoples and at different times have been the outcome of fortuitous evolution, unguided and uninfluenced by definite physiologic principles.
PopularScience_19131101_0083_005_0002.xml
article
428
428,429,430,431,432,433
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JEWISH COLONIZATION IN PALESTINE
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O. F. COOK
HISTORICAL and religious interest has been responsible for many investigations and explorations in Palestine, but the country has still to receive an adequate study from the biological and agricultural standpoints. What we are pleased to describe as European civilization had its rise in western Asia and was based on the cultivation of plants indigenous in that region.
PopularScience_19131101_0083_005_0003.xml
article
434
434,435,436,437,438,439,440
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THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL GARDEN
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DR. R. W. SHUFELDT
MY home at the present time is within ten minutes' walk of the National Zoological Park at Washington, and, as a matter of fact, when my study window is open, and outside conditions are favorable, the howling of the coyotes and wolves, the barking of the seals, and the calls of the big birds of prey are, each and all, heard with delightful distinctness.
PopularScience_19131101_0083_005_0004.xml
article
441
441,442,443,444,445,446,447,448,449
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THE DISCOVERY OF CONTACT ELECTRIFICATION
EXPERIMENT I
EXPERIMENT II
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PROFESSOR FERNANDO SANFORD
THE discovery that the mere contact of two dissimilar metals causes them to become oppositely electrified seems to be everywhere attributed to Volta, though Nicholson in the first volume of his “Journal,” published in 1802, calls attention to the fact that both Bennett and Cavallo, in England, had made experiments upon contact electrification previous to its supposed discovery by Volta.
PopularScience_19131101_0083_005_0005.xml
article
450
450,451,452,453,454,455,456,457,458,459,460,461,462,463,464,465
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THE APPLICATION OF THE PHYSIOLOGY OF COLOR VISION IN MODERN ART
INTRODUCTION
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HENRY G. KELLER
PROFESSOR J. J. R. MACLEOD
Instead of serving as an incentive to more extensive study of the use of colors in art, these words seem to have marked the advent of an epoch extending over several centuries, during which colors came to be less and less successfully employed.
PopularScience_19131101_0083_005_0006.xml
article
466
466,467,468,469,470
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THE PETRIFIED FOREST OF MISSISSIPPI
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PROFESSOR CALVIN S. BROWN
THE petrified forests of Arizona are well known to geologists and others interested in such things, but I am not aware that anything has yet been published on the petrified forest at Flora, Mississippi. There are various forms of petrified woods in the state of Mississippi, but the great majority of them are silicified woods.
PopularScience_19131101_0083_005_0007.xml
article
471
471,472,473,474,475,476,477,478,479,480,481,482,483
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ECONOMIC FACTORS IN EUGENICS
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WILLIAM LELAND HOLT
ALTHOUGH eugenics is perhaps the newest of all the sciences, it has already become one of the topics of the day. And this is well, for no science was ever founded which promises to do so much for the improvement of mankind. Sir Francis Galton defined eugenics as “the study of agencies under social control, that may improve or impair the racial qualities of future generations, either physically or mentally.” Such a broad definition evidently makes eugenics include a large part of sociology.
PopularScience_19131101_0083_005_0008.xml
article
484
484,485,486,487,488,489,490
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HOW THE PROBLEMS OF THE RURAL SCHOOLS ARE BEING MET
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MARY A. GRUPE
THE little red schoolhouse is all well enough as a matter of tradition and history. It has served its purpose and no amount of sentiment for its past achievements can make it a thing acceptable to the present generation. Time was when the one-room school house was quite as well built and furnished as the dwellings from which the children came, but that is past and there is no gainsaying that the one-room district school is generally unsightly, illy ventilated and meagerly equipped.
PopularScience_19131101_0083_005_0009.xml
article
491
491,492,493,494,495,496,497,498,499,500,501,502,503,504,505
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THE INCREASE OF AMERICAN LAND VALUES
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DR. SCOTT NEARING
SO much has been said and written regarding the theoretical importance attaching to the rise of land values that the student of economics looks eagerly for some collection of facts which shall in a measure substantiate the numerous theories advanced.
PopularScience_19131101_0083_005_0010.xml
article
506
506,507,508,509,510.,511,512,513
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THE SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT
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JAMES BURT MINER
THE public recognition that questions of development are different from questions of health has caused a constantly increasing demand for another type of expert than the physician. We may call him an expert in child development. When a parent stops to consider the matter he knows that neither the short boy nor the short-minded boy is primarily a sick boy.
PopularScience_19131101_0083_005_0011.xml
article
514
514,515,516,517,518,519,520,521,522
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE SCIENTIFIC ORIGIN OF MOVING PICTURES
LEGAL LIMITATIONS OF MARRIAGE
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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EADWEARD MUYBRIDGE began his experiments in instantaneous photography in California in 1872 and subsequently carried them forward at the University of Pennsylvania, which provided him with grants amounting to more than $40,000. We thus have an instance in which scientific investigation supported by a university has been the origin of an enterprise of immense practical and commercial importance.
PopularScience_19131101_0083_005_0012.xml