Issue: 19130801

Friday, August 1, 1913
AUGUST, 1913
2
True
83
Thursday, November 27, 2014

Articles
cover
105
105
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19130801_0083_002_0001.xml
article
105
105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124
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THE EARTH AND SUN AS MAGNETS1
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DR. GEORGE ELLERY HALE
IN 1891, Professor Arthur Schuster, speaking before the Royal Institution, asked a question which has been widely debated in recent years : “Is every large rotating body a magnet ?” Since the days of Gilbert, who first recognized that the earth is a great magnet, many theories have been advanced to account for its magnetic properties.
PopularScience_19130801_0083_002_0002.xml
article
125
125,126,127,128,129,130,131,132,133,134,135,136,137,138
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EUGENICS: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO INTELLECT AND CHARACTER1
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PROFESSOR EDWARD L. THORNDIKE
BY eugenics is meant, as you all know, the improvement of mankind by breeding. It has been decided by those responsible for this lecture—Mrs. Huntington Wilson and the president and trustees of the university—that its topic shall be the intellectual and moral, rather than the physical, improvement of the human stock.
PopularScience_19130801_0083_002_0003.xml
article
139
139,140,141,142,143,144,145,146,147,148
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EDUCATION THROUGH READING
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DR. E. BENJAMIN ANDREWS
THERE is a wide variety of motives any one of which may lead a person to become a reader. Sir John Herschel wrote: Were I to pray for a taste that should stand me in stead under every variety of circumstances, and be a source of happiness and cheerfulness to me during life, and a shield against its ills, it would be a taste for reading.
PopularScience_19130801_0083_002_0004.xml
article
149
149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157
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THE GENESIS OF PERSONAL TRAITS
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PROFESSOB S. N. PATTEN
AS a principle of evolutionary theory, it may be stated that the environment stands to the organisms within it in one group of relations during the long evolution of races and species. The part played by the environment in the development of an individual is equally important, but so unlike in character that it must be treated independently.
PopularScience_19130801_0083_002_0005.xml
article
158
158,159,160,161,162,163
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THE SEQUENCE OF SCIENCES IN THE HIGH SCHOOL
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JOSIAH MAIN
OF all the questions to which educational committees and journals have been devoted, the problem of what the high school sciences shall be, and the order in which they shall be given, shows least progress toward final agreement. The two phases, what they shall be, and where each shall go, are so related that they can not be considered separately, for while we are fixing the one, we find that we have forced the other out of place.
PopularScience_19130801_0083_002_0006.xml
article
164
164,165,166,167,168
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THE RELATION OF CULTURE TO ENVIRONMENT FROM THE STANDPOINT OF INVENTION
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DR. CLARK WISSLER
THE relation between man’s life and the physical make-up of the earth has always been a serious problem. In our schools we often hear the doctrine that geography is nothing more than the study of peoples in their adjustment to the particular part of the earth they inhabit.
PopularScience_19130801_0083_002_0007.xml
article
169
169,170,171,172,173,174,175,176,177
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THE FUTURE OF THE NORTH AMERICAN FAUNA
SIZE
HABITAT
RELATION TO MAN
FECUNDITY
MENTAL TRAITS
MISCELLANEOUS PECULIARITIES
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THE LATE WALTER L. HAHN
THAT the animal life of North America is changing is a statement requiring no proof. Every one knows that deer, elk, moose, wolves, bison and many other animals are no longer found in places where they were once numerous. Nearly every one also knows that some pests, such as rats and mice and several noxious insects, have been brought to this country from Europe, while the potato beetle and some other species, natives of North America, have multiplied and extended their range.
PopularScience_19130801_0083_002_0008.xml
article
178
178,179,180,181,182,183,184,185,186,187,188,189,190,191,192,193,194,195,196,197,198
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THE SIZE OF ORGANISMS AND OF THEIR CONSTITUENT PARTS IN RELATION TO LONGEVITY, SENESCENCE AND REJUVENESCENCE*
I. BODY SIZE
II. BODY SIZE, CELL SIZE AND CELL NUMBER
III. CELL SIZE AND NUCLEAR SIZE
IV. LONGEVITY, SENESCENCE AND REJUVENESCENCE
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PROFESSOR EDWIN G. CONKLIN
BODY size is one of the most variable properties of organism; the smallest living things are probably invisible to the highest powers of the microscope, the largest are gigantic beasts weighing many tons. Within the same class, and in animals equally complex in structure, variations in size are enormous, as, for example, in the elephant and the mouse.
PopularScience_19130801_0083_002_0009.xml
article
199
199,200,201,202,203,204
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BERNOULLI'S PRINCIPLE AND ITS APPLICATION TO EXPLAIN THE CURVING OF A BASEBALL
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S. LEROY
WHEN a liquid or a gas is flowing through a horizontal pipe and encounters a constriction in the pipe, there is a higher velocity of the fluid and a lower pressure in the constriction than in the larger section of the pipe. At first thought, this is contrary to what one would expect, for the crowding of the fluid into a smaller section would apparently raise the pressure.
PopularScience_19130801_0083_002_0010.xml
article
205
205,206,207,208,209,210
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE BUREAU OF SCIENCE OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
DISTRIBUTION AND CAUSE OF PELLAGRA
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE annual report of the acting director of the Bureau of Science, maintained under the government of the Philippine Islands, for the year ending with July, 1912, has just reached this country, and bears witness to the accomplishment of a considerable amount of scientific work.
PopularScience_19130801_0083_002_0011.xml