Issue: 19130501

Thursday, May 1, 1913
MAY 1913
5
True
82
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Articles
cover
417
417
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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article
417
417,418,419,420,421,422,423,424,425,426,427,428,429,430,431,432,433,434,435
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A PROBLEM IN EVOLUTION
I. THE SCOPE OF MORPHOLOGY
II. MISSING LINKS IN THE GENEALOGY OF THE ANIMAL KINGDOM
III. THE ORIGIN OF VERTEBRATES ABANDONED AS A HOPELESS PROBLEM
IV. FIRST CLUES TO A NEW SOLUTION
V. THE OSTRACODERMS
VI. A CRITICAL PERIOD IN ORGANIC EVOLUTION
VII. THE RECORD OF PALEOZOIC EVENTS IN MODERN VERTEBRATE EMBRYOS
VII. CONCLUSION
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PROFESSOR WILLIAM PATTEN
WHEN evolution became the accepted doctrine of the natural sciences, it was incumbent on the zoologists to construct a genealogy. or nhvlogenv. of the animal kingdom, one that would reveal the great highways of evolution and disclose the historic sequence in the rise of new kinds of animals, from the dawn of life to the present time, from the rotozoon to man.
PopularScience_19130501_0082_005_0002.xml
article
436
436,437,438,439,440,441,442,443,444
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THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS OF THE PLAINS
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DR. CLARK WISSLER
A NTHROPOLOGY is one of the newer sciences. Its develonment during the past ten years makes clear that regardless of the original meaning of the term anthrotology, and, in spite of any one's opinion on the subject, it is primarily a culture study.
PopularScience_19130501_0082_005_0003.xml
article
445
445,446,447,448,449,450,451,452
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HEREDITY AND THE HALL OF FAME
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FREDERICK ADAMS WOODS
WHAT is there in heredity? Ask the horseman, the dog fancier and the horticulturalist, and you will find that a belief in heredity is the cardinal point of all their work. Among animals and plants nothing is more obvious than the general resemblance of offspring to parents and the stock from which they come.
PopularScience_19130501_0082_005_0004.xml
article
453
453,454,455,456,457,458,459,460,461,462,463,464,465,466,467
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THE MAN WHO DISCOVERED THE CIRCULATION OF THE BLOOD
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PROFESSOR D. FRASER HARRIS
THE discoverer of the circulation of the blood was a London doctor called William Harvey. The discovery of the circulation of the blood is the foundation of modern medicine; it was epoch-making, for it made possible that marvelous epoch in which we have seen the laws of living matter discovered and the actual, physical causes of the most mysterious diseases revealed.
PopularScience_19130501_0082_005_0005.xml
article
468
468,469,470,471,472,473,474,475,476,477
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GREAT EROSIONAL WORK OF WINDS
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DR. CHARLES R. KEYES
AS in the eighteenth century marine Plantation was one of the notable discoveries in earth-study, and as in the last century the theory of general peneplanation through stream-corrasion was one of the grander conceptions of the age, so the recognition of desert windscour as the principal among erosional agencies seems destined to take its place among the first half-dozen great and novel thoughts which shall especially distinguish geologic science of the twentieth century.
PopularScience_19130501_0082_005_0006.xml
article
478
478,479,480,481,482,483,484,485,486,487,488,489,490,491
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HOSPITALS, THEIR ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION
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JOHN FOOTE
THE story of the birth and evolution of the hospital is a record of the conquest of barbarism by civilization and of the triumph of Christian altruism over the selfishness of the pagan ideal. Bargaining, trading, warring, the nations of the earth have struggled upward along the difficult highway of achievement, making slow but certain progress in the betterment of humanity.
PopularScience_19130501_0082_005_0007.xml
article
492
492,493,494,495,496,497,498,499,500,501,502,503
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THE NEW OPTIMISM
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PROFESSOR G. P. W. PATRICK
WE may distinguish three stages in the development of optimism. There was first the old a priori optimism of St. Augustine and Leibniz. One hears no more of this now. You may prove from the good intentions of the Creator that this world must be the best possible one, but the whole argument rests upon presuppositions that have less weight than formerly.
PopularScience_19130501_0082_005_0008.xml
article
504
504,505,506,507,508,509
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WELFARE AND THE NEW ECONOMICS
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PROFESSOR SCOTT NEARING
ECONOMIC thought is undergoing a profound and rapid transformation. Linked, as it must ever be, with the problems of government, economics has been drawn into the maelstrom of progressivism which has gripped the western world. Vainly do the classicists protest. Futility grips the throats of the doctrinaires.
PopularScience_19130501_0082_005_0009.xml
article
510
510,511,512,513,514,515,516
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SCHOLARSHIP AND THE STATE
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PROFESSOR F. C. BROWN
FROM time to time articles appear from the press and more frequently still words are passed from person to person, which indicate that a great many citizens of our American states believe that scholarship exists only for the pleasure and profit of those who seek it.
PopularScience_19130501_0082_005_0010.xml
article
517
517,518,519,520,521,522
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE NUMBER OF SCIENTIFIC MEN IN TEE WORLD
THE SCIENTIFIC CAREER IN THE UNITED STATES
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE second edition of the international ‘ ‘ Who ’s Who in Science ’ ’ (edited by H. H. Stephenson, London, 1913) gives a classified index, from which can be counted up the number of scientific men in different countries and in different sciences.
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