Issue: 19130401

Tuesday, April 1, 1913
APRIL, 1913
4
True
82
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Articles
cover
313
313
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19130401_0082_004_0001.xml
article
313
313,314,315,316,317,318,319,320,321,322,323,324,325,326,327,328,329,330,331
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THE INFLUENCE OF FORESTS UPON CLIMATE
INTRODUCTION: POPULAR BELIEF IN FOREST INFLUENCES, AND ITS POSSIBLE ORIGIN
IMPORTANCE OF THE SUBJECT: ITS COMPLEXITY
THE HISTORICAL METHOD OF TREATMENT: ITS UNRELIABLE RESULTS
AN ESSENTIAL CONSIDERATION: WHY SHOULD FORESTS INFLUENCE CLIMATE?
FORESTS AS WIND-BREAKS
INFLUENCE OF FORESTS UPON TEMPERATURE
INFLUENCE OF FORESTS UPON HUMIDITY AND EVAPORATION
INFLUENCE OF FOEESTS UPON RAINFALL: WHY DO WE EXPECT IT?
FORESTS AND RAINFALL: THE OBSERVATIONS AND THE DIFFICULTIES
THE LINTZEL CASE
THE NANCY CASE
THE INDIAN CASE
THE JAVA CASE
RECENT EUROPEAN STUDIES
CONCLUSION REGARDING RAINFALL
INFLUENCE OF FORESTS IN COLLECTING MOISTURE FROM CLOUDS AND FOGS
INFLUENCE OF FORESTS UPON HAIL AND OTHER STORMS
THE HYGIENIC INFLUENCE OF FORESTS
THE INFLUENCE OF FORESTS UPON WATER-SUPPLY, EROSION AND FLOODS
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PROFESSOR ROBERT DEC. WARD
FAR and wide, the world over, we find a popular belief in an influence of forests upon climate, especially upon rainfall. This is not difficult to explain. Take our own experience, for example. On a summer day we leave the hot, sunny road and walk along a narrow forest path.
PopularScience_19130401_0082_004_0002.xml
article
332
332,333,334,335,336,337
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GOETHE AND THE CHEMISTS
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ROY TEMPLE HOUSE
WE learn from “Dichtung und Wahrheit” that when the young Goethe came home ill from the University of Leipzig in 1768, he fell under the influence of a physician who claimed to have found an infallible panacea which he did not dare use because he was afraid of legal action against him.
PopularScience_19130401_0082_004_0003.xml
article
338
338,339,340,341,342,343,344,345,346,347,348,349,350,351,352
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THE DOMESTICATION OF AMERICAN GRAPES
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PROFESSOR U. P. HEDRICK
THERE are about forty species of grapes in the world, more than half of which are found in North America. Few other plants on this continent grow wild under such varied conditions and over such extended areas. Thus, wild grapes are found in the warmer parts of New Brunswick; on the shores of the Great Lakes; everywhere in the rich woodlands and thickets of the North and Middle Atlantic States; on the limestone soils in the mountainous parts of Kentucky, Tennessee and the Virginias; and they thrive in the sandy woods, sea plains and reef-keys of the South Atlantic and Gulf States, where a single vine of the Scuppernong often clambers over trees and shrubs for a hundred feet or more.
PopularScience_19130401_0082_004_0004.xml
article
353
353,354,355,356,357,358,359,360,361,362,363,364,365,366,367,368,369,370,371,372,373,374,375
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UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE1
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ALFRED C. REED
THE wide-spread ignorance of the various means employed by the federal government to promote the well-being of its citizens is nowhere better exemplified than in the common ignorance of the functions and important work of the Public Health Service.
PopularScience_19130401_0082_004_0005.xml
article
376
376,377,378,379,380
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THE INCREASING MORTALITY FROM DEGENERATIVE MALADIES
MORTALITY STATISTICS
DEGENERATIVE DISEASES
DEGENERATIVE DISEASES
GENERAL DEATH RATE-OLDER AGE GROUPS
SIXTEEN7 REGISTRATION CITIES. 1880—1910
MASSACHUSETTS AND NEW JERSEY. 1880—1910
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E. E. RITTENHOUSE
IT is quite generally believed by those who have studied American morbidity and mortality tendencies that there has been a marked increase in recent years in the death rate from chronic diseases of the important and hardest worked organs of the body.
PopularScience_19130401_0082_004_0006.xml
article
381
381,382,383,384,385,386,387
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THE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY AS A DYNAMIC IN THE MOVEMENT FOR PHYSICAL WELFARE
ANALYSIS OF RISKS FOUND IMPAIRED FREE ANNUAL HEALTH BUREAU EXAMINATIONS
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EUGENE LYMAN FISK
THE average careless liver, although he may be perfectly willing to swallow some “magic” elixir, exhibits uneasiness tinged with suspicion when approached on the subject of prolonging his life by means of adjusting him to his environment.
PopularScience_19130401_0082_004_0007.xml
article
388
388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,396
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NATURAL SELECTION
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PROFESSOR T. D. A. COCKERELL
THE lowest forms of life show the greatest stability in their specific characters. Any one who will examine a little pond water under the microscope will see numerous minute Protozoa belonging to different families, genera and species. Close study brings out the fact that although we regard these as very low types, they are complicated little animals, with remarkable characters.
PopularScience_19130401_0082_004_0008.xml
article
397
397,398,399,400,401,402,403,404,405,406,407,408,409,410,411,412
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SOME RANDOM THOUGHTS CONCERNING COLLEGE CONDITIONS
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PROFESSOR JOHN J. STEVENSON
AN ever-increasing proportion of the community seems to be convinced that every youth, male or female, on American soil, has a natural right to collegiate and even to professional education at nominal or no cost. That so many have been deprived of the opportunity to acquire a college degree is one of the saddest of the world’s many tragedies; good men and women, having exhausted the joy of conscious usefulness in the ordinary philanthropic operations, find new zest in contriving methods whereby those excluded from college attendance may secure the coveted parchment with a minimum of expense and inconvenience.
PopularScience_19130401_0082_004_0009.xml