Issue: 19130201

Saturday, February 1, 1913
FEBRUARY, 1913
2
True
82
Saturday, October 18, 2014

Articles
cover
105
105
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19130201_0082_002_0001.xml
article
105
105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124
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THE GEOLOGIC HISTORY OF CHINA AND ITS INFLUENCE UPON THE CHINESE PEOPLE
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PROFESSOR ELIOT BLACKWELDER
THE Chinese empire includes an area larger than the United States with the addition of Alaska and our insular possessions. A large part of this vast area, however, is made up of dependencies which are but loosely joined to China proper, and are not essential to its integrity.
PopularScience_19130201_0082_002_0002.xml
article
125
125,126,127,128,129,130,131
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FRENCH GEODESY
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THE LATE HENRI POINCARE
EVERY one understands our interest in knowing the form and dimensions of our earth; but some persons will perhaps be surprised at the exactitude sought after. Is this a useless luxury ? What good are the efforts so expended by the geodesist?
PopularScience_19130201_0082_002_0003.xml
article
132
132,133,134,135,136,137,138,139,140,141,142,143,144,145,146,147,148,149,150,151,152
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THE RÔLE OF MEMBRANES IN CELL-PROCESSES
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PROFESSOR RALPH S. LILLIE
THE importance of membranes in vital processes bas long been recognized. From the earliest times anatomists have been impressed with the frequency with which thin sheets of solid material occur as elements of structure in organisms. Even elementary methods of analysis show that the materials composing the most various organs often tend to dispose themselves in thin, continuous layers.
PopularScience_19130201_0082_002_0004.xml
article
153
153,154,155,156,157,158,159,160,161,162
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THE PROBLEM OF THE EFFICIENCY OF LABOR
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HOWARD T. LEWIS, M.A.
IT may truthfully be said that industrial evolution is little else than the progressive development of economic efficiency, and the various stages in the story of the evolution of industrial society have been largely based upon man’s control over nature as indicated by his industrial efficiency.
PopularScience_19130201_0082_002_0005.xml
article
163
163,164,165,166,167
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BERGSON’S VIEW OF ORGANIC EVOLUTION
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DE. HERVEY W. SHIMER
THE French philosopher Henri Bergson has most appropriately chosen as the title of his book on development the name “Creative Evolution.” As the name implies, to the inevitableness, the invariability of evolution as developed through physico-chemical laws, this philosophy adds the spontaneity, the indetermination of creation.
PopularScience_19130201_0082_002_0006.xml
article
168
168,169,170,171,172,173,174,175,176
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THE ABILITIES OE AN “ EDUCATED ” HORSE
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PEOFESSOR M. V. O’SHEA
THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN DURING the last few years a number of “ educated ” horses have been prominently before the public, alike in this country and in the old world, and they have received enthusiastic praise from all sorts of people. Doubtless some readers of this article saw and admired Blondine, who exhibited his “ marvelous ” powers continuously during the Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo.
PopularScience_19130201_0082_002_0007.xml
article
177
177,178,179,180,181,182,183,184,185,186
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THE ADVANCEMENT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
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FREDERIC LYMAN WELLS, PH.D.
TEACHING and research are the coordinate ways upon which any body of knowledge advances. Though we are apt to think first of the former, the latter is indeed the more basic, since before we can talk of teaching we must acquire something to teach; as, to a large extent, it is still the task of psychological medicine to do.
PopularScience_19130201_0082_002_0008.xml
article
187
187,188,189,190,191
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IMMENSE SALT CONCRETIONS
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PROFESSOR G. D. HARRIS
Crystalline salt masses may be a mile in diameter! Where are they? How were they formed? Who said so? Interrogations like these are sure to be forthcoming from layman, chemist and geologist alike whenever such startling assertions are made.
PopularScience_19130201_0082_002_0009.xml
article
192
192,193,194,195,196,197,198,199,200,201,202
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COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY?
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DR. STEWART PATON
WHAT is the difference between the college and the university? There is no blinking the fact that many of the students, most of the alumni, as well as a large proportion of the members of the faculties and administrative boards, including presidents, have very nebulous views in regard to the fundamental distinction that exists between these two classes of institutions.
PopularScience_19130201_0082_002_0010.xml
article
203
203,204,205,206,207,208,209,210
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THE PEOGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE CLEVELAND CONVOCATION WEEK MEETING
AN EXTINCT SPECIES OF MAN
THE SEALS OF THE PRIBILOF ISLANDS
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THERE was an excellent meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the affiliated national scientific societies at Cleveland during the week of January first. The scope and magnitude of their work can be indicated by a statement of the number of papers on the prog ram for the different sciences, namely :
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