Issue: 19120901

Sunday, September 1, 1912
SEPTEMBER, 1912
3
True
81
Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Articles
cover
208
208,209
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19120901_0081_003_0001.xml
article
209
209,210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,221,222,223,224,225,226
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RESEARCH IN MEDICINE1
V. MEDICAL RESEARCH IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES; PRESENT FACILITIES, NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES2
BIBLIOGRAPHY
BOOKS
ADDRESSES AND PAPERS
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PROFESSOR RICHARD M. PEARCE
IF the preceding lectures have a special value, it is in indicating, on the basis of past experience, the methods and mode of approach, which will presumably yield the greatest measure of success in the investigation of present and future problems.
PopularScience_19120901_0081_003_0002.xml
article
227
227,228,229,230,231,232,233,234,235,236,237
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WIND-GRAVED MESAS AND THEIR MESSAGE
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DR. CHARLES R. KEYES
STRANGE and striking are the positive features of landscape presented by the continental divide in our southern arid country of New Mexico and Arizona. Wildest, least visited and most desolate section of our land is this, over which to-day still roams at will the aborigine in numbers greater for size of area than was ever known in any part of our realm since advent of European.
PopularScience_19120901_0081_003_0003.xml
article
238
238,239,240,241,242,243,244,245
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OLD LAMPS FOR NEW
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JOHN MILLS
THE lament for the good old days, which rises so frequently from academic circles, has recently in the case of Amherst College resulted in definite action and policy. Following the recommendations of a group of alumni of the eighties, Amherst has reacted against the commercial and technical tendency of modern education, and here-after is to be wholly and frankly classical in its aims and its curriculum.
PopularScience_19120901_0081_003_0004.xml
article
246
246,247,248,249
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THE REVIVAL OF ECONOMIC ORTHODOXY
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PROFESSOR S. M. PATTEN
TO the student of thought, it is interesting to see how long a theory persists after its foundations have been undermined. One can almost say of theories that, like superstitions, they never die. They have at least nine lives and are killed again and again before their adherents can give them up.
PopularScience_19120901_0081_003_0005.xml
article
250
250,251,252,253,254,255,256,257,258,259,260,261,262,263,264,265,266,267,268,269,270,271,272,273,274
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GEORGE MARCGRAVE, THE FIRST STUDENT OF AMERICAN NATURAL HISTORY
BIBLIOGRAPHY
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DR. E. W. GUDGER
GEORGE MARCGRAVE1 was born at Liebstadt in Saxony in 1610, went as physician with the expedition of Count Maurice of Nassau-Siegen to Brazil in 1638, wrote 'Historia Rerum Naturalium Brasiliæ' and died on the coast of Guinea in 1644." Such are the accounts, when divested of errors, given of Marcgrave in our biographical dictionaries.
PopularScience_19120901_0081_003_0006.xml
article
275
275,276,277,278,279,280,281,282,283
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THE REAL PROBLEM OF COMMISSION GOVERNMENT
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OSWALD RYAN
THAT no problem has laid a severer tax on the political genius of our people than the perplexing problem of city government every student of our political experience knows. Ever since James Bryce called attention to "the one conspicuous failure of the American people"—the failure of the city governments—our publicists and statesmen have been searching restlessly for the model system of government which was to rescue the cities from inefficiency and misrule.
PopularScience_19120901_0081_003_0007.xml
article
284
284,285,286,287,288,289,290
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GENIUS AND HAIR-COLOR
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CHARLES KASSEL
OF the physiognomy of man—so interesting in its every phase—no feature can boast a more varied interest than the hair. Remnant of the coarse fur which once covered the body of the human animal— withdrawn at last, after a losing battle with time, to its invincible retreat and stronghold upon the head—this relic of beast life grew with the process of the suns into a thing of use and meaning,—a mark of race, an emblem of rank, a symbol of religion, and lastly, but chief of all, into an adornment of surpassing beauty affording to Cupid a most potent weapon in his merry warfare against the sons and daughters of men.
PopularScience_19120901_0081_003_0008.xml
article
291
291,292,293,294,295,296,297,298,299,300,301,302,303,304,305,306,307
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A CONSIDERATION OF THE NATURE OF HUNGER1
APPETITE AND HUNGER
THE SENSATION OF HUNGER
THE THEORY THAT HUNGER IS A GENERAL SENSATION
HUNGER THE RESULT OF CONTRACTIONS
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PROFESSOR W. B. CANNON
WHY do we eat?" This question, presented to a group of educated people, is likely to bring forth the answer, "We eat to compensate for body waste, or to supply the body with fuel for its labors." Although the body is in fact losing weight continuously and drawing continuously on its store of energy, and although the body must periodically be supplied with fresh material and energy in order to keep a more or less even balance between the income and the outgo, this maintenance of weight and strength is not the motive for taking food.
PopularScience_19120901_0081_003_0009.xml
article
308
308,309,310,311,312,313
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY
THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL EUGENICS CONGRESS
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE charter of the Royal Society of London was signed on July 15, 1662, and exactly two hundred and fifty years thereafter the event has been adequately celebrated. The organization of society in Great Britain makes social functions more successful than they are with us, and the events of the celebration were social rather than scientific.
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