Issue: 19120401

Monday, April 1, 1912
APRIL, 1912
4
True
80
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Articles
cover
313
313
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19120401_0080_004_0001.xml
article
313
313,314,315,316,317,318,319,320,321,322,323,324,325
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ON THE NEED OF ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGES IN THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
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IN the first of a series of articles on the higher education in this country, which were published in The Forum during the years 1902 and 1903, I designated the true functions of a great university as “chiefly these three: (1) The highest mental and moral culture of its own students; (2) the advancement, by research and discovery, of science, scholarship and philosophy; (3) the diffusion, as from a center of light and influence, of the benefits of a liberal, genial and elevating culture over the whole nation, and even over all mankind.”
PopularScience_19120401_0080_004_0002.xml
article
326
326,327,328,329,330,331,332,333,334,335,336,337,338
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SCIENCE IN THE SERVICE OF HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION
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CLIFFORD RICHARDSON
IN a popular sense, a road is a means of communication by vehicle between different localities. To the citizen who ordinarily uses it, aside from considerations of its aspect and surroundings, the condition of the surface and the ease of traction over it have been the main considerations.
PopularScience_19120401_0080_004_0003.xml
article
339
339,340,341,342,343,344,345
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THE BROOKLYN BOTANIC GARDEN
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DR. C. STUART GAGER
THE Brooklyn Botanic Garden is a department of The Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences. The institute itself, an organization of some 7,500 members, is the outgrowth of a movement starting in 1823, for the establishment in Brooklyn of a free library for apprentices.
PopularScience_19120401_0080_004_0004.xml
article
346
346,347,348,349,350,351,352,353,354,355,356,357,358,359
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ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT1
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DR. EDWARD F. WILLIAMS
WITH Baron von Humboldt, says the late Professor Louis Agassiz, “ends a great period in the history of science: a period to which Cuvier, Laplace, Arago, Gay-Lussac, De Candolle and Robert Brown belonged.” It was a period of tireless research, of important discoveries, of brilliant generalizations.
PopularScience_19120401_0080_004_0005.xml
article
360
360,361,362,363,364,365,366,367,368,369,370,371,372
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A REVIEW OF THREE FAMOUS ATTACKS UPON THE STUDY OF MATHEMATICS AS A TRAINING OF THE MIND
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PROFESSOR FLORIAN CAJORI
NO doubt the most famous attack that has ever been made upon mathematics and its educational value was published in 1836 in the Edinburgh Review by Sir William Hamilton, professor of logic and metaphysics at Edinburgh. He must not be confounded with his contemporary, Sir William Rowan Hamilton, the inventor of quaternions.
PopularScience_19120401_0080_004_0006.xml
article
373
373,374,375,376,377,378,379,380,381,382
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THE RED SUNFLOWER
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PROFESSOR T. D. A. COCKERELL
ONCE upon a time, in England, a certain bishop visited a Sunday-school. Being asked to question the children, he inquired of a small and timid boy, “Who made the world?” Completely rattled, the child made no answer. The bishop asked a second time, and, again getting no result, exclaimed in some wrath, “Is it possible, my dear boy, that you don’t know who made the world?”
PopularScience_19120401_0080_004_0007.xml
article
383
383,384,385,386,387,388,389,390,391,392
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THE MEDICAL SIDE OF IMMIGRATION
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DR. ALFRED C. REED
PERHAPS no question is of more paramount and continuing interest to the American people than immigration in all its phases and relations to public welfare. The history of the United States is the history of alien immigration. The earliest pioneers were themselves alien immigrants.
PopularScience_19120401_0080_004_0008.xml
article
393
393,394,395,396,397,398,399
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ANCIENT PORTALS OF THE EARTH
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PROFESSOR JAMES PERRIN SMITH
Portals Defined.—A study of the distribution and relationships of ancient marine faunas shows that there have been certain critical areas through which these faunas were connected from time to time. These critical areas are depressions on or between continental masses, and are invariably regions of permanent instability of the earth’s crust, where mountain-making and the accompanying volcanic and earthquake disturbances have been prevalent.
PopularScience_19120401_0080_004_0009.xml
article
400
400,401,402,403,404
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PTOMAINES AND PTOMAINE POISONING
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EDWIN LE FEVRE
THE subject of food poisoning is one that is commanding a constantly increasing attention on the part of the general public. A brief résumé therefore of the most important facts relating to ptomaines and ptomaine poisoning together with some deductions based thereon may be of interest to all who would be informed on matters relating to their physical welfare—certainly so to those who are practical conservators of the public health.
PopularScience_19120401_0080_004_0010.xml
article
405
405,406,407,408,409,410,411,412
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SCIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL GOOD WILL
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J. McKEEN CATTELL
SCIENCE with its applications has been one of the principal factors leading to peace and international good will. Science, democracy and the limitation of warfare are the great achievements of modern civilization. They have advanced together almost continuously from the beginnings of the universities of Bologna, Paris and Oxford in the twelfth century to their great triumphs in the nineteenth century and the present promise of their complete supremacy.
PopularScience_19120401_0080_004_0011.xml
article
413
413,414,415,416,417,418
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE ROCKEFELLER INSTITUTE FOR MEDICAL RESEARCH
EXPLORATION AND ADVENTURE IN THE ANTARCTIC
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research has issued an interesting brochure giving an account of its history, organization and equipment. The institution was incorporated in 1901 with a board of directors consisting of seven distinguished pathologists, at which time Mr. John D. Rockefeller pledged a sum of $200,000 to be given in ten annual installments.
PopularScience_19120401_0080_004_0012.xml