Issue: 19120301

Friday, March 1, 1912
MARCH, 1912
3
True
80
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Articles
cover
209
209
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19120301_0080_003_0001.xml
article
209
209,210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,221,222,223,224,225,226,227,228,229,230,231,232,233,234,235
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GLIMPSES OF THE GREAT AMERICAN DESERT
COMPOSITION OF SAND HILL SOIL
SIZE OF SOIL PARTICLES
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PROFESSOR RAYMOND J. POOL
THOUSANDS of years ago when the forces of nature were at work shifting and gradually shaping the features of the Great Plains, large areas of Tertiary sandstones were exposed in Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas and other parts of the western plains. As topographic features were slowly evolved, these sandstones, being young and soft, readily yielded to the eroding action of the elements and were reduced to light, fine-grained sand.
PopularScience_19120301_0080_003_0002.xml
article
236
236,237,238,239,240,241,242,243,244,245
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A NEW DEVELOPMENT IN THE MISSISSIPPI DELTA
INTRODUCTION
THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI DELTA NOT A NORMAL ONE
MUDLUMPS
CONTINENTAL SHELF
MUDLUMP CLAY
ACTIVE MUDLUMP CONES
MUD LAYER FORMED BY FLOCCULATION BEYOND THE BAR
MECHANISM OF MUDLUMP UPHEAVAL
EADS’S PROPOSITION TO OPEN THE SOUTH PASS
A MUDLUMP APPEARS IN SOUTH PASS, CONFIRMING AUTHOR’S THEORY
POSSIBLE FORESTALLING OF FARTHER UPHEAVALS
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PROFESSOR E. W. HILGARD
IN 1867 the writer was commissioned by the Smithsonian Institution to determine, if possible, the geological age and mode of formation of the rock salt deposit on Petite Anse Island, Louisiana. This involved, of course, a general examination of the coast formations of Louisiana, and among them, of the Passes of the Mississippi, and of the puzzling phenomena of “ mudlump ” upheaval in the Passes, which, at times, seriously obstructed commerce, but the origin of which remained a matter of conjecture.
PopularScience_19120301_0080_003_0003.xml
article
246
246,247,248,249,250,251,252,253,254,255,256
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THE IMPERIAL UNIVERSITIES OF JAPAN
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H. FOSTER BAIN
THE public school system in Japan, as in the United States, is capped by the university. In keeping, however, with the highly centralized government of the former country, the university is controlled and supported by the imperial government, whereas in America the support of higher education has been left so far to the individual states.
PopularScience_19120301_0080_003_0004.xml
article
257
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EFFICIENCY WAGE STANDARDS
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PROFESSOR SCOTT NEARING
EFFICIENCY, when applied to personal capacity, signifies a maximum of return with a minimum of outlay; hence one man is more efficient than another if, with a given expenditure of energy, time, raw material or capital, he can secure a larger, though equally good, product.
PopularScience_19120301_0080_003_0005.xml
article
263
263,264,265,266,267,268,269,270,271,272
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THE INSTINCTIVE ELEMENT IN HUMAN SOCIETY
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PROFESSOR CHARLES A. ELLWOOD
FOR two decades or more sociologists have been proclaiming that the development of their science must be through psychology and must wait accordingly upon the development of that science. Now that psychology has achieved a very considerable development and relative unanimity of opinion with regard to certain fundamentals, it is strange to find sociologists, and workers in the social sciences generally, loath to make use of some of its assured results.
PopularScience_19120301_0080_003_0006.xml
article
273
273,274,275,276,277,278,279
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TYPES OF MEN
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PROFESSOR S. N. PATTEN
THE study of human types has fallen into disrepute because of the advance of exact science. Accurate measurements have displaced crude observations. In this way, the science of eugenics has been evolved with many earnest advocates who think the victories of physical science may be duplicated in social fields.
PopularScience_19120301_0080_003_0007.xml
article
280
280,281,282,283,284,285,286,287,288
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TIME AND SPACE
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CHARLES W. SUPER
IT requires but a moment's reflection on the part of any one in the least familiar with modern affairs to realize that the time element has come to be the most important factor in business. Railroad trains and steam vessels are run according to time schedules.
PopularScience_19120301_0080_003_0008.xml
article
289
289,290,291,292,293,294,295,296,297
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PROFESSIONAL TRAINING FOR CHILD HYGIENE
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LEWIS M. TERMAN
NO one acquainted with the problems of professional education can read Mr. Abraham Flexner's exposé of the status of medical education in the United States and Canada without a feeling of profound gratitude. His description of conditions is so masterly and variegated as to give the impression of utter completeness.
PopularScience_19120301_0080_003_0009.xml
article
298
298,299,300,301,302
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THE FOUR PERIODS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE MODERN ZOOLOGICAL SYSTEM
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PROFESSOR H. S. PRATT
IN 1758 when Linnæus published the epoch-making tenth edition of his "Systema Naturæ" the science of zoology was in a backward condition, having made but little progress for a long period of time. Some important advances, it is true, had been made by the generation immediately preceding that event.
PopularScience_19120301_0080_003_0010.xml
article
303
303,304,305,306,307
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FLORENTINO AMEGHINO
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DR. W. D. MATTHEW
IN the death of this distinguished paleontologist science has sustained a heavy loss. Our knowledge of the splendid succession of fossil mammalian life in the Argentine is due principally to the work of Amèghino. A collector and explorer whose energy and enthusiasm no handicap of opposition and poverty could overcome, a student of immense learning and keen insight, a writer and controversialist of extraordinary facility and dialectic skill, a broad thinker and daring speculator, above all a man of high ideals and great patriotism, his life and achievements are well worthy of admiration and respect.
PopularScience_19120301_0080_003_0011.xml
article
308
308,309,310,311,312,313,314
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
TEN YEARS OF THE CARNEGIE INSTITUTION
LORD LISTER
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE tenth, yearbook of the Carnegie Institution of Washington is of special interest, as it records a further gift from the founder of ten million dollars and reviews the history of the institution for its first ten years. The endowment is now $22,000,000 in five per cent. bonds of the steel corporation, worth at least $25,000,000.
PopularScience_19120301_0080_003_0012.xml