Issue: 19111101

Wednesday, November 1, 1911
NOVEMBER, 1911
5
True
79
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
417
417
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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article
417
417,418,419,420,421,422,423,424,425,426,427,428,429,430
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THE BERING RIVER COAL FIELD, ALASKA
INTRODUCTION
THE GEOGRAPHY OF THE REGION
THE GEOLOGY OF THE BEGION
THE STRUCTURE OF THE REGION
THE COAL
DEVELOPMENT
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
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GEORGE F. KAY
THE Bering River coal field lies a few miles inland from the north shore of Controller Bay, an indentation of the Pacific coast about 1,200 miles from Seattle. In this field are the Cunningham claims which received much publicity in connection with the Pinchot-Ballinger controversy.
PopularScience_19111101_0079_005_0002.xml
article
431
431,432,433,434,435,436,437,438,439,440,441,442,443,444,445,446,447,448,449
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INSECT PARASITISM AND ITS PECULIARITIES
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PROFESSOR WILLIAM MORTON WHEELER
IT is universally admitted that economic entomology, like such other branches of applied biology as medicine and sanitary science, is to a very considerable extent the strategics of our warfare with a host of parasites, which are forever endeavoring to destroy our bodies, our domestic animals, our food supply, our clothing and the very materials with which we construct our dwellings and on which we write or print our interpretations of the wonderful world in which we live.
PopularScience_19111101_0079_005_0003.xml
article
450
450,451,452,453,454,455,456,457,458
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MATHEMATICS AND ENGINEERING IN NATURE
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PROFESSOR ARNOLD EMCH
WHEN up on the heights, among the imposing wilderness of rocks, crags and pines, the mountaineer is struck by the roaring sound of a storm, he may observe clearly that the weather-beaten trees of a mountain forest, like other organic beings, have to defend themselves against the external attacks of nature.
PopularScience_19111101_0079_005_0004.xml
article
459
459,460,461,462,463
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AMERICAN MATHEMATICS
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PROFESSOR G. A. MILLER
ABOUT a dozen years ago a well-known French mathematician wrote as follows in reference to our mathematical situation :1 “Mathematics in all its forms and in all its parts is taught in numerous [American] universities, treated in a multitude of publications, and cultivated by scholars who are in no respect inferior to their fellow mathematicians of Europe.
PopularScience_19111101_0079_005_0005.xml
article
464
464,465,466,467,468,469,470,471,472,473
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BUFFON AND THE PROBLEM OF SPECIES
I
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PROFESSOR ARTHUR O. LOVEJOY
THERE is no chapter of the history of the theory of organic evolution more confused or more controverted than that which relates to the position of Buffon. Upon one point, indeed, nearly all expositors of the “Histoire Naturelle” are agreed—namely, that Buffon’s own expressions on the subject, if taken at their face value, contradict one another.
PopularScience_19111101_0079_005_0006.xml
article
474
474,475,476,477,478,479,480,481,482,483,484,485
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A WORLD—WIDE COLOR LINE
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PROFESSOR U. G. WEATHERLY
ONE phase of the declining birth-rate among the white peoples of European stock has become increasingly important now that world interests have begun to override national and continental interests. If mere numbers should turn out to be the determining factor in fixing the balance of world power the European peoples can not hope much longer to retain the hegemony which they have held since the period of wider colonization began.
PopularScience_19111101_0079_005_0007.xml
article
486
486,487,488,489,490,491,492,493,494,495
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THE CROSSING OF THE RACES
A STUDY OF THE GENERAL PRINCIPLES GOVERNING THE SUCCESSFUL INTERMIXTURE OF DIFFERENT PEOPLES, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE QUESTION OF IMMIGRATION INTO THE UNITED STATES.
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DR. J. G. WILSON
THE question of racial amalgamation is almost as old as the race itself. For, not only the earliest traditions, but also the most ancient relics bear witness to the fact that extensive intermarriage of races had been brought about through commerce and war long before history had begun to unravel the tangled skein of man’s wanderings.
PopularScience_19111101_0079_005_0008.xml
article
496
496,497,498,499,500,501
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THE CONSERVATION OF THE FOOD SUPPLY
CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND ENERGY OF INCOME AND OUTGO PER DAY
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DR. HENRY PRENTISS ARMSBY
THE maintenance of the food supply is the basal problem of civilization. Before commerce or manufactures or mining can be carried on—before science or art or religion can flourish—man must be fed. Hitherto, the people of the United States, thinly scattered over a country of vast extent and seemingly exhaustless fertility, have scarcely realized that there is such a thing as a food problem, but more and more frequently of late there are heard warnings of the danger of an inadequate food supply for our future millions and of the resultant peril to our democracy through the fostering of caste and class distinctions.
PopularScience_19111101_0079_005_0009.xml
article
502
502,503,504,505,506,507,508,509,510,511,512,513
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THE MORAL INFLUENCE OF A UNIVERSITY PENSION SYSTEM
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DR. HENRY S. PRITCHETT
WHILE a college or university can not divest itself of a humane duty towards an old or worn-out teacher, it does not follow that every college is under an obligation to establish at once a system of retiring allowances. The obligation for a service performed is one thing; the question of taking on general obligations for services to be performed is quite another.
PopularScience_19111101_0079_005_0010.xml
article
514
514,515,516,517,518,519,520,521,522
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
COLLEGE STUDIES AND PROFESSIONAL TRAINING
THE PORTSMOUTH MEETING OF THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION
A HANDBOOK OF UNIVERSITIES
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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IN The Educational Review for October, President Lowell, of Harvard University, gives some interesting statistics in regard to studies pursued in college and success in the work of the professional school. In a general way he finds that students who enter Harvard College without conditions do well in their college studies and that students who do well in college also do well in the schools of law and medicine, whereas their standing in the professional schools is not dependent on the kinds of studies pursued in college.
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