Issue: 19110801

Tuesday, August 1, 1911
AUGUST, 1911
02
True
79
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
105
105
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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article
105
105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124,125
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THE SIGNIFICANCE OF TROPISMS FOR PSYCHOLOGY¹
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PROFESSOR JACQUES LOEB
THE scientific analysis of psychical phenomena must, I believe, aim to explain these phenomena according to laws of physical chemistry. I know very well that many people would hold that even a complete physico-chemical analysis of all psychic phenomena must still leave the " truly psychical" unexplained.
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article
126
126,127,128,129,130,131,132,133,134,135,136
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FEELING IN THE INTERPRETATION OF NATURE
Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower,
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PROFESSOR WM. E. RITTER
HUMAN beings, in common with all others, are as fundamentally esthetic and emotional as they are cognitive and rational. This conclusion I believe to be warranted not only by the facts presented by adult man in civilized society, but also by those observable in very early, simple stages of life everywhere.
PopularScience_19110801_0079_002_0003.xml
article
137
137,138,139,140,141,142,143,144,145,146,147,148,149,150
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THE TYPHOID FLY ON THE MINNESOTA IRON RANGE¹
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PROFESSOR F. L. WASHBURN
TOWARD the northern part of Minnesota, running from a point near Coleraine and Hibbing on the west to Ely on the east, is a low ridge of land, on an average about 1,200 feet above seal level, known, as most of you are aware, as the Minnesota Iron Range.
PopularScience_19110801_0079_002_0004.xml
article
151
151,152,153,154,155,156,157,158,159
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WHAT MAKES A COLLEGE?
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PROFESSOR A. B. WOLFE
FEW aspects of present educational thought are more striking than the persistent and telling criticism it is bringing to bear on the American College. The universal demand for efficiency in our national life has put the college on trial—and has caught it in a state of unpreparedness to make a consistent defense in its own behalf.
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article
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i6o,161,162,163,164
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THE UNIVERSITY IN POLITICS
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PROFESSOR T. D. A. COCKERELL
SEEKING to define the functions of a university in a few words, I have thought that we might say : the purpose of a university is to conserve useful truth and to add to it. It should be in some sort the axis of our intellectual and moral growth, whence proceed the flowers and fruits of achievement.
PopularScience_19110801_0079_002_0006.xml
article
165
165,166,167,168,169,170
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THE CLASSIFICATION OF THE SCIENCES
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DR. IRA WOODS HOWERTH
THE sciences are divided by Spencer, Karl Pearson and others into two great groups, the abstract sciences and the concrete sciences. The abstract sciences are those which deal with the modes under which the phenomenal world is perceived.
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article
171
171,172,173,174,175,176,177,178,179,180,181,182,183,184,185,186,187,188,189,190
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FRANCIS GALTON
ANCESTRY AND TRAINING
EXPLORATION AND GEOGRAPHICAL SCIENCE
PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND METEOROLOGY
BIOLOGY AND BIOMETRY, HUMAN FACULTY AND HEREDITY
EUGENICS
THE MAN AND HIS METHODS
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DR. J. ARTHUR HARRIS
TO the man of affairs the progress of science must seem monotonously methodical. Should he walk through the scientific section of a great library he would find massive walls of books, journals and learned transactions, and would note that year by year the tomes of which these walls are built up become a little thicker and that new and more specialized series are interpolated among the old.
PopularScience_19110801_0079_002_0008.xml
article
191
191,192,193,194,195,196,197,198,199,200,201,202,203
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THE ORIGIN OF LUMINOUS METEOR TRAINS
RECENT REMARKABLE TRAINS SEEN IN ENGLAND
METEOR TRAINS OBSERVED IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1901
THE METEOR TRAIN ZONE
EXPERIMENTS ON PHOSPHORESCENT GASES IN THE LABORATORY
How THE METEOR TRAINS MAY BE FORMED
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DR. C. C. TROWBRIDGE
THE nature of the luminous cloud occasionally left glowing in the wake of large meteors and called the “ persistent ” streak or train has long been regarded as a mystery by astronomers. Many of these trains have been observed which have remained visible to the naked eye for quite as long as fifteen or thirty minutes after the disappearance of the burning metorite itself.
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article
204
204,205,206,207,2O8,209,210
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE EXTENSION OF THE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATUBAL HISTORY
THE PEOTECTION OF THE FUR SEALS
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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NEW YORK CITY has provided with wise foresight for the museum that it will need in the future by setting aside for the purpose the whole of Manhattan Square, extending from Central Park to Ninth Avenue and from Seventy-seventh Street to Eighty-first Street.
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