Issue: 19110501

Monday, May 1, 1911
MAY, 1911
5
True
78
Friday, November 28, 2014

Articles
cover
417
417
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19110501_0078_005_0001.xml
article
417
417,418,419,420,421,422,423,424,425,426,427
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THE FORMATION OF NORTH AMERICAN NATURAL BRIDGES
WILLIAMS COLLEGE
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PROFESSOR HERDMAN F. CLELAND
ALTHOUGH there are more than fifty natural bridges of considerable size in North America, comparatively few persons have ever seen one, the reason being that, with the exception of the Virginia bridge and the natural bridge in North Adams, Mass., most of them are more or less inaccessible.
PopularScience_19110501_0078_005_0002.xml
article
428
428,429,430,431,432,433,434,435,436,437,438,439,440,441,442,443,444
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SOME WEATHER PROVERBS AND THEIR JUSTIFICATION
SEASONS
SUN
SKY COLORS
CORONAS AND HALOES
MOON
STARS
WIND
CLOUDS
SOUND
ANIMALS
PLANTS
ACHES AND PAINS
MISCELLANEOUS
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W. J. HUMPHREYS
THIS thousand-year-old observation by England’s wisest ruler recognizes the fact that fine weather induces good tempers, and therefore amply justifies the proverb that shrewdly bids one “ Do business with men when the wind is in the northwest.”
PopularScience_19110501_0078_005_0003.xml
article
445
445,446,447,448,449,450,451,452,453,454,455,456,457,458,459
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SCIENCE AT THE MEDIEVAL UNIVERSITIES
DEAN AND PROFESSOR OF THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE AND OF NERVOUS DISEASES AT FORDHAM UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, NEW YORK
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JAMES J. WALSH
WITH the growth of interest in science and in nature study in our own day, one of the expressions that is probably oftenest heard is surprise that the men of preceding generations and especially university men did not occupy themselves more with the world around them and with the phenomena that are so tempting to curiosity.
PopularScience_19110501_0078_005_0004.xml
article
460
460,461,462,463,464,465,466,467,468
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THE SEARCH FOR THE SOUL IN CONTEMPORARY THOUGHT
STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
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PROFESSOR G. T. W. PATRICK
THE history of the soul appears to be the history of a vanishing quantity. It has indeed come now to have hardly more than an anthropological interest.1 In recent text-books of psychology the word “ soul ” does not occur and the word “ mind ” seldom or not at all.
PopularScience_19110501_0078_005_0005.xml
article
469
469,470,471,472,473,474,475,476
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PROGRESS IN CONTROL OF PLANT DISEASES
PROFESSOR OF BOTANY AND VEGETABLE PATHOLOGY IN THE N. C. COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS AND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
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DR. F. L. STEVENS
PLANTS are subject to disease. As in the human being these diseases decrease vigor and productiveness of the organism or cause death. An attack upon valuable plant products such as ripe fruit, tubers and root crops, and mature timber may result in depreciation in value or even entire loss of the product.
PopularScience_19110501_0078_005_0006.xml
article
477
477,478,479,480,481,482,483,484,485,486,487,488,489,490
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THE SERVICES AND REWARDS OF THE OLD GREEK VOLUNTEER
RECENTLY ACTING PROFESSOR OF GREEK AT LEHIGH UNIVERSITY AND SOMETIME G. A. R. FELLOW AT BROWN UNIVERSITY
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FREDERIC EARLE WHITAKER
FROM Athens to America; from Marathon, Salamis and Chæronea to Bunker Hill, Gettysburg and Manila Bay, greatness and gratitude have been inseparable terms in national glory. From the earliest history of soldiery down to our day, martial renown and even long lease of national life have been won by those nations only which asked the greatest sacrifice and bestowed the greatest honors and rewards upon their citizen-soldiers.
PopularScience_19110501_0078_005_0007.xml
article
491
491,492,493,494,495,496,497,498,499
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LANGUAGE AND LOGIC
ATHENS, O.
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DK. CHARLES W. SUPER
WHETHER language is coordinate with thought and merely a phase of it ; whether it may be used with a very slight admixture of thought; or whether thought is possible without language, are problems that have engaged the attention of thinkers from the dawn of philosophy.
PopularScience_19110501_0078_005_0008.xml
article
500
500,501,502,503,504,505,506,507,508,509,510,511,512,513,514,515
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THE LANGUAGES OF THE AMERICAN INDIANS
LANGUAGE AND HISTORY
INDIAN LINGUISTIC FAMILIES
THE GEEAT UTO-AZTEKAN STOCK
CLIFF DWELLERS AND PUEBLOS
THE ALGONKIN FAMILY ON TILE ATLANTIC
CONSERVATISM OF INDIAN LANGUAGES
THE ESKIMO
How THE LANGUAGES SOUND
WRITING OF INDIAN
HUMBER OF WORDS
How THE GRAMMAR IS ASCERTAINED
THE PHONOGRAPH
“ GLUING TOGETHER ”
POLYSYNTHESIS
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DR. A. L. KROEBER
THE day is past when educated people believed that the Indian languages were only random jargons of a few inarticulate sounds, without grammar or order, and so badly in need of supplementary gestures to make them intelligible that the Indians could not converse in the dark.
PopularScience_19110501_0078_005_0009.xml
article
516
516,517,518,519,520,521,522
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
CIRCULATING PROFESSORS
THE CAVENDISH LABORATORY OF CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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HARVARD and Columbia Universities have for several years maintained an exchange of professors with the Prussian government, and both universities have recently made similar arrangements for Paris. Columbia has had at least one visiting professor from Copenhagen, and Wisconsin has recently obtained a Karl Schurz endowment for German professors.
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