Issue: 19110401

Saturday, April 1, 1911
APRIL, 1911
4
True
78
Monday, December 29, 2014

Articles
cover
313
313
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19110401_0078_004_0001.xml
article
313
313,314,315,316,317,318,319,320,321,322,323,324,325,326,327,328,329,330,331,332,333,334,335,336,337,338,339,340
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THE GENESIS OF THE LAW OF GRAVITY
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PROFESSOR JOHN C. SHEDD
SINCE the earliest ages man has been interested in the world outside of himself. Thunderstorms, waterfalls, winds, waves, fire, the starry heavens have aroused his wonder, admiration or fear. During the earlier stages of racial development the simplest phenomenon was explained by reference to some arbitrary power, and soon gods and demigods were conceived of as presiding over the agencies of nature.
PopularScience_19110401_0078_004_0002.xml
article
341
341,342,343,344,345,346,347,348,349,350,351,352,353,354
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EDWARD PALMER1
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WILLIAM EDWIN SAFFORD
EDWARD PALMER is a man well named. A palmer of the olden time was one who had traveled to the Holy Land in fulfilment of a vow, and brought back with him a palm branch to be placed on the altar of his parish church. Afterwards the name was applied to pilgrims who traveled unceasingly from land to land, under a perpetual vow of poverty and celibacy.
PopularScience_19110401_0078_004_0003.xml
article
355
355,356,357,358,359,360,361,362,363
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FREUD’S THEORIES OF THE UNCONSCIOUS
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PROFESSOR H. W. CHASE
ONCE upon a time it was the fashion to demonstrate witchcraft by sticking pins into the unlucky suspect. If any spots were found that appeared insensitive to pain, the unfortunate was forthwith declared a witch, with dire consequences to herself.
PopularScience_19110401_0078_004_0004.xml
article
364
364,365,366,367,368,369,370
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IMPRESSIONS OF MILITARY LIFE IN FRANCE1
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PROFESSOR ALBERT LEON GUÉRARD
I SERVED 309 days—we counted them from the very first, and shouted every morning “Encore tánt et la fuite!”—as secondclass private in the 129th regiment of the line, stationed at Le Havre. I was paid one cent a day, and in addition was entitled, every ten days, to a packet of tobacco at half its market value.
PopularScience_19110401_0078_004_0005.xml
article
371
371,372,373,374,375,376
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REALITY AND TEUTH
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PROFESSOR T. D. A. COCKERELL
REALITY may be conceived of as having three aspects, the knowable or scientific, the imaginable or metaphysic, and the unimaginable or metapsychic. These three elements of being are not in themselves distinct, but depend for their separation on the condition of the perceiving mind.
PopularScience_19110401_0078_004_0006.xml
article
377
377,378,379,380
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THE COST OF LIVING
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HENRY PRATT FAIRCHILD
"THE increased cost of living” is a phrase familiar to almost every American tongue in these days. Newspapers and magazines are full of the topic. A wide variety of investigators are earnestly searching for the causes, and divers explanations have been offered.
PopularScience_19110401_0078_004_0007.xml
article
381
381,382,383,384,385,386,387
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ALCOHOL—ITS USE AND ABUSE1
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PROFESSOR GRAHAM LUSK
WHEN the writer was a former student in Munich about 1890, there was a very great quantity of beer partaken of by the inhabitants of the town, and also by the German people in general. The “beer duel” consisted in draining a large jug of beer which was lifted from the table at a given sign, and he who first brought the empty jug back on the table was the winner of the duel.
PopularScience_19110401_0078_004_0008.xml
article
388
388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,396,397,398,399,400,401,402,403,404,405,406,407,408
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SCIENTIFIC VERSUS PERSONAL DISTRIBUTION OF COLLEGE CREDITS
TABLE I HARVARD COLLEGE
TABLE II HARVARD COLLEGE
Figure 6 Showing Percentages of Various Grades in Total Grades of each Instructor hoving over 100 Students
Mean and Extreme Distributions of Grades A-E
TABLE III
TABLE IV UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI
TABLE V
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PRESIDENT WILLIAM T. POSTER
EARLIER articles in the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY and in Science have shown that grades in college courses have no exact meaning.1 Yet college honors are everywhere awarded on the naïve assumption that grades in college courses are distributed on a scientific basic.
PopularScience_19110401_0078_004_0009.xml
article
409
409,410,411,412,413,414,415,416
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1910
THE RESEARCH WORK OF THE CARNEGIE INSTITUTION
THE HOUSE OF ASA GRAY
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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PRELIMINARY announcements have been made of the population of the states and of some of the cities as determined by the thirteenth census. The population of continental United States is 91,972,267, as compared with 75,994,575 in 1900, an increase of 21 per cent.
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