Issue: 19101201

Thursday, December 1, 1910
DECEMBER, 1910
6
True
77
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
521
521
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0001.xml
article
521
521,522,523,524,525,526,527,528,529,530,531,532,533,534,535,536,537
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THE ILONGOT OR IBILAO OF LUZON
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DR. DAVID P. BARROWS
THE grewsome practise of taking human heads is particularly associated with the Igorot peoples of the Cordillera of Luzon. These all engage in it or have done so until recently. But to-day the most persistent and dreaded headhunters are neither Igorot nor inhabitants of the Cordillera; they are a wild, forest-dwelling people in the broken and almost impenetrable mountain region formed by the junction of the Sierra Madre range with the Caraballo Sur.
PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0002.xml
article
538
538,539,540,541,542,543,544,545,546,547,548,549,550,551,552,553
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KANT AND EVOLUTION
I
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PROFESSOR ARTHUR O. LOVEJOY
IT has come to be one of the generally accepted legends of the history of science that the author of the “Kritik der reinen Vernunft” was also a pioneer of evolutionism. In the anthropological essays of the Koenigsberger, for example—we are assured by the writer of a German treatise on Kant’s philosophy of nature1—“we already find the most essential conceptions of the modern theory of descent indicated, at least in germ—and, indeed, in a way that marks Kant out as a direct precursor of Darwin.”
PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0003.xml
article
554
554,555,556,557,558,559,560
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CLASSICS AND THE COLLEGE COURSE
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PROFESSOR JOHN J. STEVENSON
TWO or three years ago, the acting president of a state university praised the small college for exalting the humanities, for making “study of the great classics compulsory but attractive. It has always found more power for both head and heart in the noble lines of the Iliad and in the majestic music of the Æneid than in study of the nervous system of the frog or the life history of the Harpiphorus maculatus, interesting and important as those are.”
PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0004.xml
article
561
561,562,563,564,565,566,567,568,569
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LEARNING FOREIGN LANGUAGES
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DR. CHARLES W. SUPER
WHEN we consider that in all the high schools and colleges of christendom, with few exceptions, the pupils are required to study one or more foreign languages, we can not but admit that the subject is one of the utmost importance. And more than this: in the public schools of many of our large cities thousands of children are engaged in the study of English, which is to them a foreign language.
PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0005.xml
article
570
570,571,572,573,574,575,576,577,578
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SOME EUROPEAN CONDITIONS AFFECTING EMIGRATION
RUSSIA
GREECE
AUSTRIA-HUNGARY
ITALY
SWITZERLAND
GERMANY
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ARTHUR CLINTON BOGGESS
FROM what economic and social conditions do our immigrants from Europe come? This was the question that came to me after reading book after book concerning the immigrant after he has reached America. A diligent gathering from many sources, chiefly official documents, has brought to light many facts of much interest to one who really cares to know the character of the surroundings of those who are thronging our shores.
PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0006.xml
article
579
579,580,581
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GENIUS AND STATURE
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CHARLES KASSEL
THAT greatness and loftiness of stature are rarely found together is one of the leading statements of Lombroso’s “Man of Genius,” and the eminent Italian, in support of his assertion, arrays a respectable list of names. Nor does Lombroso stand alone in this opinion.
PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0007.xml
article
582
582,583,584,585,586,587,588,589
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CERTAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SOUTH AMERICANS OF TO-DAY
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PROFESSOR HIRAM BINGHAM
UNTIL very recently, the average newspaper article and the talk of the average person, so far as it went, took it for granted that South America was a region devoted to revolutions and fevers, where individuals called South Americans spent their time in a cheerful state of anarchy.
PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0008.xml
article
590
590,591,592,593
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WHEN DOES A FOOD BECOME A LUXURY?
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PROFESSOR E. H. S. BAILEY
IN the rapid expansion which is taking place in this country, and in attempting to adjust ourselves to these changed conditions, and to the higher price of foodstuffs, there is danger that we forget to differentiate as carefully as we formerly did, between a nutritious food, which is purchased for its food value, and other products, also good enough as foods, but which are sold at prices which bring them within the domain of luxuries.
PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0009.xml
article
594
594,595,596,597
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THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD THE BIRTHPLACE OF MAN
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PROFESSOR S. W. WILLISTON
VARIOUS writers, from Le Conte to Smith Woodward, have spoken of critical or rhythmical periods in evolution, periods when evolutionary forces have acted more vigorously than at others, with intervals of relative quiescence. What these forces are and have been we are not yet sure, whether extrinsic, that is, environmental or Lamarckian, or intrinsic, that is, orthogenetic, teleological or what not.
PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0010.xml
article
597
597,598,599,600,601,602
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THE RELATION OF PALEONTOLOGY TO THE HISTORY OF MAN, WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO THE AMERICAN PROBLEM
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PROFESSOR JOHN C. MERRIAM
CONSIDERED in its broadest aspect, the most important relation of paleontology to the study of man concerns the support which it gives to the general theory of evolution of the organic world. If it be held that we have reason to believe man, with all his highest qualities, a product of evolution out of so-called lower animal types, then it becomes necessary to have a full knowledge of the history of man and of the forms preceding him, in order to understand the origin and the true nature of man’s fundamental characteristics as they exist to-day.
PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0011.xml
article
603
603,604,605,606,607,608,609,610,611,612
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TWO ACTIVE VOLCANOES OF THE SOUTH SEAS
BARNARD COLLEGE, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, AND THE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
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PROFESSOR HENRY E. CRAMPTON
IN the course of a fourth journey among the islands of the Pacific Ocean, during the year 1909, the rare opportunity was presented of making an ascent of the remarkably active volcano formed about five years ago on the island of Savaii, the largest member of the Samoan group.
PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0012.xml
article
613
613,614,615,616,617,618,619,620
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE RICE INSTITUTE
SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS AND SCIENTIFIC MEN IN THE MIDDLE WEST
THE DISTRIBUTION OF AMERICAN MEN OF SCIENCE
THE DEATH OF PROFESSOR BREWER
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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IN 1891 the late William M. Rice, a native of Massachusetts, who emigrated to Texas and there amassed a large fortune, selected a board of six trustees, and to them made over the sum of two hundred thousand dollars, the foundation of future philanthropies.
PopularScience_19101201_0077_006_0013.xml
article
621
621,622,623,624,625,626
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INDEX
NAMES OF CONTRIBUTORS ARE PRINTED IN SMALL CAPITALS
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Adaptive Radiation, Paleontologic Evidences of, HENRY FAIRFIELD OSBORN, 77 Agassiz, Alexander, ALFRED GOLDSBOROUGH MAYER, 419 Agricultural Graphics, 515 Alexander Agassiz—An Autograph Letter, 515 Alligator, The Home of the, A. M. REESE, 365
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