Issue: 19100901

Thursday, September 1, 1910
SEPTEMBER, 1910
3
True
77
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Articles
cover
209
209
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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209
209,210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,221,222,223,224,225
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THE ZOOLOGICAL STATION AT NAPLES
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PROFESSOR CHARLES LINCOLN EDWARDS
TWENTY centuries ago the rain of ashes and pumice-stone from Vesuvius buried Pompeii, and, at the same time, a stream of mud sealed up Herculaneum. Within the period of the last three hundred years, four times in succession, Torre del Greco has been covered by the flowing lava, but each time this town has been rebuilt.
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article
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A UNIQUE COLLECTION OF ARITHMETICS
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DR. LOUIS C. KARPINSKI
RECENT visitors to the Metropolitan Museum of Art have been impressed by the wealth of the loan collections standing in names comparatively unknown to the general public. A two-million-dollar sale of works of art lately excited only passing comment—in spite of the fact that many priceless treasures were forever lost to America.
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article
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236,237,238,239,240,241
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JOHN DEE AND HIS “FRUITFUL PREFACE”
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MARY ESTHER TRUEBLOOD
IT may be necessary to introduce this “faithful student of the school of verity,” for his contribution to human thought was of the kind that is easily absorbed in the sum total of the period, while the man himself remains little known to any but his contemporaries. The writer’s introduction to him was through his “fruitful preface” to the first translation of Euclid’s “Elements” into English printed in 1570.
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article
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242,243,244,245,246,247,248,249,250,251
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THE MAKING OF THE SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATOR
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THOMAS H. MONTGOMERY, JR.
THE question is old but important, how far a man may influence his destiny and career by power of will and by training. Very often it is argued that his future lies entirely with himself, that he is modeling clay in his own hands. From this comes the expression of “the self-made man.”
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article
252
252,253,254,255
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THE CAUSE OF SOCIAL PROGRESS AND OF THE RATE OF INTEREST
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PROFESSOR J. PEASE NORTON
IT has been generally considered by the scholars of the social sciences that there is no fundamental cause in human societies for social progress. Indeed, the whole Malthusian theory is to the effect that the overwhelming rate of increase possible in human societies tends to keep a considerable percentage of the members of a society on the threshold of continuous poverty.
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article
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PARASITIC CULTURE
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GEORGE E. DAWSON
IT is a fact well recognized in biology that a functionless organ is not tolerated by nature. In the evolution of life, whenever any organic structure has fallen into disuse, it has forthwith come under the law of atrophy and elimination. Until this law of atrophy and elimination is satisfied, the useless organ is a drain upon the vitality of the organism as a whole.
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article
264
264,265,266,267,268,269,270,271,272,273
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CENTRALIZED AUTHORITY AND DEMOCRACY IN OUR HIGHER INSTITUTIONS
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PROFESSOR EDWIN D. STARBUCK
IT is somewhat embarrassing to appear on a program that I myself have assisted in devising. It demands an explanation. It is, in short, an instance of too highly centralized authority in this association in the hands of our lively general secretary.
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article
274
274,275,276,277,278,279,280,281,282,283,284,285
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THE FIVE-FOLD FUNCTIONS OF GOVERNMENT
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W J McGEE
ORGANIZATIONS, like organisms, are products of development. Governmental organizations, like most others, are increasingly designed and shaped in the light of conscious experience. Thus, the constitution of the United States epitomized the lessons of history so far as recognized by its framers, whereby the instrument became the embodiment of governmental practise and theory gained through known experience.
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article
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286,287,288,289,290,291
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ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF AMERICAN SOCIETIES
TABLE I AMERICAN ASSOCIATES
TABLE II HONORARY MEMBERS
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PROFESSOR EDWARD C. PICKERING
TWO papers on “Foreign Associates of National Societies” were published in THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, Vol. 73, p. 372, and Vol. 74, p. 80, in which the foreign membership of the seven great scientific societies of the world was discussed.
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article
292
292,293,294
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THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD
ONTOGENY: A STUDY OF THE VALUE OF YOUNG FEATURES IN DETERMINING PHYLOGENY
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PROFESSOR F. B. LOOMIS
IN this paper I want to study what value is to be given to the principle that ontogeny is a brief recapitulation of phylogeny, when it comes to the concrete determination of the ancestry of a given genus. For the purpose three types have been studied carefully and several more for confirmations, the principal study being between the young and adult of the pig, cat and man, the differences being noted to see if they suggested the forms considered ancestral.
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295,296,297,298
THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD
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PALEONTOLOGY AND ONTOGENY
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PROFESSSOR A. W. GRABAU
ONTOGENY, or the life history of the individual, is commonly interpreted by zoologists as its embryology, the later stages of development, from infancy to old age, being deemed of little or no importance. This was the case fifty years ago; this is largely the case to-day.
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PALEONTOLOGY AND THE RECAPITULATION THEORY
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E. R. CUMINGS
BATHER once said that “If the embryologists had not forestalled them, the paleontologists would have had to invent the theory of recapitulation.” This may be considered as a fair sample of the attitude of at least the Hyatt school of paleontologists toward the theory. It is doubtful if any paleontologist could be found who wholly rejects it.
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THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD
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VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY AND THE EVIDENCES FOR RECAPITULATION
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L. HUSSAKOF
AFTER the careful papers of Professors Loomis and Lull in which the doctrine of recapitulation was so fully set forth from the standpoint of vertebrate paleontology, I can perhaps do no better than devote part of the time allotted me to showing how certain leading vertebrate paleontologists have viewed this question.
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article
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE SCIENTIFIC LABORATORIES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY
COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY IN AMERICA
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE colleges first established in this country prior to the revolution, apart from the two in Virginia, have all become great universities within the past forty years. Harvard, Yale, Columbia and Pennsylvania have preceded Princeton in this development, and for a period it was doubtful whether Princeton should be ranked among the universities or among the colleges.
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