Issue: 19100701

Friday, July 1, 1910
JULY TO DECEMBER, 1910
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Monday, December 1, 2014

Articles
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2,3,4
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19100701_0077_001_0001.xml
article
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5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18
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A NATURALIST IN THE STRAITS OF MAGELLAN1
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DR. CHARLES HASKINS TOWNSEND
IT was in January and February of the misty Antarctic summer that we lingered for a month along the seven hundred miles of Magellan Strait and Smythe Channel. The delicate flowers of a December springtime were passing out of bloom giving place to flowers of longer duration, and young land birds were all out of their nests.
PopularScience_19100701_0077_001_0002.xml
article
19
19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27
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THE FUTURE OF THE HUMAN RACE
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PROFESSOR T. D. A. COCKERELL
EVOLUTION is not an orderly march along a well-defined highway, to the slow time of the music of the spheres. In its details, it is an irregular process, sometimes so slow that millions of years seem to make no difference; sometimes so rapid that a single generation marks a notable advance.
PopularScience_19100701_0077_001_0003.xml
article
28
28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41
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MIDDLE AND DISTANCE RUNNING
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CHAS. E. HAMMETT
IS middle and distance running as practised in our schools and colleges injurious or is it not? The verdict of spectators at an intercollegiate or interscholastic track meet, as the contestants cross the finish line frequently exhibiting every evidence of exhaustion, would probably be in the affirmative.
PopularScience_19100701_0077_001_0004.xml
article
42
42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55
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THE SYMBOLISM OF DREAMS
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HAVELOCK ELLIS
THE dramatization of subjective elements of the Personality, which contributes so largely to render our dreams vivid and interesting, rests on that dissociation, or falling apart of the constituent groups of psychic centers, which is so fundamental a fact of dream-life.
PopularScience_19100701_0077_001_0005.xml
article
56
56,57,58,59,60
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MODERN MEDIEVALISM
DR. FRANK T. CARLTON
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HISTORY moves in a spiral, not in a circle. History does not accommodatingly repeat itself; but it does pass through cycles in which new eras contain social elements and forces which approximate those of periods belonging to earlier cycles.
PopularScience_19100701_0077_001_0006.xml
article
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61,62,63,64,65,66
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THE NATURE OF DISEASE AND OF ITS CURE
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DR. JAMES FREDERICK ROGERS
THE earliest explanation of disease, corresponding to the ideas of nature which first impressed the dawning human consciousness, was that the usual working of the body had been upset by the entrance into it of an evil spirit. This spirit proceeded to disturb the “ ease ” of the body of the sick man, causing it to reject and eject food, racking it with pain, and burning it with the slow fire of fever, and even talking through its lips in incoherent or mysterious utterances.
PopularScience_19100701_0077_001_0007.xml
article
67
67,68,69,70
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THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD PALEONTOLOGIC EVIDENCES OF CLIMATE
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T. W. STANTON
TO every one climate is an interesting theme. The climates of the past, especially when they can be shown to differ in character or distribution from those of the present, attract the attention of the general public, and they are of importance to the special student of geologic history whether his researches deal with the purely physical aspects of the subject or include some branch of paleontologie study.
PopularScience_19100701_0077_001_0008.xml
article
70
70,71,72,73,74,75,76,77
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THE MIGRATION AND SHIFTING OF DEVONIAN FAUNAS
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PROFESSOR HENRY S. WILLIAMS
IN the year 1881 I presented before the American Association for the Advancement of Science the first definite announcement of the theoiy of recurrent faunas, applying it to the fauna of the Marcellus, Genesee and Ithaca black shales of New York, which I then conceived to be represented by the continuous fauna of the black shales of Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee; and also in the same paper the theory of shifting of faunas was applied to the Hamilton and Chemung faunas of central New York.1
PopularScience_19100701_0077_001_0009.xml
article
77
77,78,79,80,81
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PALEONTOLOGIC EVIDENCES OF ADAPTIVE RADIATION
LIMBS AND FEET
TEETH
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PROFESSOR HENRY FAIRFIELD OSBORN
THE law of adaptive radiation1 is an application of paleontology of the idea of divergent evolution as conceived and developed successively in the studies of Lamarck, Darwin, Huxley and Cope. It 1 Osborn, H. F., “The Law of Adaptive Radiation,” Amer. Naturalist, Vol. XXXVI., Xo. 425, pp. 353-303.
PopularScience_19100701_0077_001_0010.xml
article
82
82,83,84,85,86,87,88,89,90,91,92,93,94,95,96,97
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INSTINCT AND INTELLIGENCE IN BIRDS—II
III. MULTIPLE AND SUPERIMPOSED NESTS
IV. ECCENTRIC BEHAVIOR; ROBIN OFFERING STRING TO YOUNG
V. PREMATURE LAYING OF EGGS, OMISSION OF UEST-BUILDING AND PARASITISM
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PROFESSOR FRANCIS H. HERRICK
ADEIBERT COLLEGE THE cyclical instincts of birds, present, as we have seen, a wellordered series, rising and waning in due course, until the reproductive cycle is complete. Nevertheless, the order and harmony which commonly prevail are subject to many disturbances of a transient, or of a more lasting character.
PopularScience_19100701_0077_001_0011.xml
article
98
98,99,100,101,102,103,104,105
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
MEDICAL EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES
ROBERT KOCH
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE authorities of the Johns Hopkins University have issued a pamphlet in the interest of the endowment and extension fund which they need and should have. The General Education Board has undertaken to contribute $250,000, on condition that $750,000 be obtained from other sources: but the university aims at more than this.
PopularScience_19100701_0077_001_0012.xml