Issue: 19100601

Wednesday, June 1, 1910
JUNE, 1910
8
True
76
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
521
521
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0001.xml
article
521
521,522,523,524,525,526,527,528,529,530,531
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SCIENTIFIC WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
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W J McGEE
THE ancients saw in the four elements of earth, air, water and fire the basis of being; moderns recognize earth, air, water and sun as the prime requisites for individual and national existence. The earth is of three parts: the life and growth on the surface; the surface, which sustains life and growth; and the part beneath, which sustains the surface with its life and growth.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0002.xml
article
532
532,533,534,535,536,537,538,539,540,541,542,543,544,545,546,547,548,549,550,551,552,553,554,555,556
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INSTINCT AND INTELLIGENCE IN BIRDS.—I
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PROFESSOR FRANCIS H. HERRICK
THERE is no doubt, as Jevons has remarked, that if ants had better brains than men, they would either destroy the human race or reduce it to a state of slavery, but these busy little workers offer no black or yellow peril to mankind, for they are all headed in the wrong direction.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0003.xml
article
557
557,558,559,560,561,562,563,564
CAUSES OF INSANITY
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TWO PREVENTABLE CAUSES OF INSANITY
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DR. THOMAS W. SALMON
A FEW successful skirmishes in the interminable conflict with disease happened to take place recently on American soil. We saw the weapons of defense which scientific research had forged for us valiantly wielded by some of our countrymen and a new interest in preventive medicine, which has spread far beyond the ranks of the medical profession, was the result.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0004.xml
article
565
565,566,567,568,569
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THE INDIAN FAIRY BOOK
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SPENCER TROTTER
AFTER our boyish occupation of following cows home from pasture, along brambly ways where delay was often invited by some untimely mocker in the shape of a bird that lured us into pursuit, we would go up in the gathering dusk to the house on the hill and listen through the hour before supper to the stories in the Indian Fairy Book.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0005.xml
article
570
570,571,572,573,574,575,576,577,578,579,580
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SCENERY, SOIL AND THE ATMOSPHERE
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PROFESSOR ALBERT PERRY BRIGHAM
THE atmosphere is commonly considered as a body of gases surrounding the globe, but hardly as a part of our sphere. We must, however, look upon it as being of the very substance of our earth, an integral part of the planet as truly as the waters or the solid crust.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0006.xml
article
581
581,582
THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD
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THE PALEONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY CONFERENCE PAPERS
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PROFESSOR JOHN M. CLARKE
Introductory.—The birth of a new society devoted to special scientific aims counts but little for the advancement of knowledge and culture in these days of multiplex organizations if it fails to come into being and before the world with an adequate excuse and a clean-cut purpose.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0007.xml
article
582
582,583,584,585,586
THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD
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ADEQUACY OF THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD
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PROFESSOR SAMUEL CALVIN
WHEN or how life began on our planet no one may be able to tell us; but that life has been present and has been an important factor in the world’s geological development since before the beginning of the Cambrian is known to the most callow of embryo geologists taking his first course at the village high school.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0008.xml
article
586
586,587,588,589
THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD
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ADEQUACY OF THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD
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THE imperfection or inadequacy, instead of the adequacy of the paleontologic record, has long been a favorite subject of discussion, and it is only within recent years that this heresy of an imperfect record is being abandoned by paleontologists in general.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0009.xml
article
589
589,590,591
THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD
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INTERDEPENDENCE OF STRATIGRAPHY AND PALEONTOLOGY
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IN discussing this subject from the view-point of a vertebrate paleontologist, I am disposed to lay stress on what I believe ought to be, rather than what has been, the degree of interpendence of these two branches of geology. Vertebrate paleontology has been studied very largely from the morphological and genealogical side, a study of structure, adaptation and the evolution of phyla.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0010.xml
article
591
591,592,593,594,595,596,597,598,599,600
THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD
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BIOLOGIC PRINCIPLES OF PALEOGEOGRAPHY
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PROFESSOR CHARLES SCHUCHERT
IN deciphering the ancient geography as to the position of the marine waters and the land masses, we as pioneers in this work must be controlled primarily by the known fossilized life and secondarily by the character and place of deposition of the geologic formations.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0011.xml
article
601
601,602,603
THE PALEONTOLOGIC RECORD
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BIOLOGIC PRINCIPLES OF PALEOGEOGRAPHY
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DR. F. H. KNOWLTON
CONSIDERING the breadth and intricacy of the subject assigned me, and the limited time that can be given to its consideration, it has seemed best to me to restrict my remarks to two or three of the obviously more important phases of the problem.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0012.xml
article
604
604,605,606,607,608,609,610,611,612,613,614
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THE CASE OF HARVARD COLLEGE
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PROFESSOR J. McKEEN CATTELL
THE free elective system, three years of college in preparation for the professional school, personal freedom for the student, these are tenets that Harvard has made familiar to us all. But the pendulum now swings backward. It is already decided that the work of the student is to be concentrated and dispersed by faculty decree; that preparatory schools are to be established for freshmen.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0013.xml
article
615
615,616,617,618,619,620
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE SALARIES OF PROFESSORS
SIR WILLIAM HUGGINS
LORD KELVIN
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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AT the eleventh annual conference of the Association of American Universities Professor G. H. Marx, of Stanford University, presented an elaborate study of the problem of the assistant professor. It appears that assistant professors in the leading universities are of an average age of thirty-seven years, and have an average salary of $1,800.
PopularScience_19100601_0076_008_0014.xml
article
621
621,622,623,624
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INDEX
NAMES OF CONTRIBUTORS ARE PRINTED IN SMALL CAPITALS
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Academic Efficiency, Tests of, RICHARD C. MACLAURIN, 487 Agassiz, Alexander, The Death of, 515 Agriculture, Department of, Scientific Work of, W J McGEE, 521 American Farming, Reorganization of, HOMER C. PRICE, 462 Ancient Climates of the West Coast, JAMES PERRIN SMITH, 478
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