Issue: 19100501

Sunday, May 1, 1910
MAY, 1910
7
True
76
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
417
417
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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article
417
417,418,419,420,421,422,423,424,425,426,427,428
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HEREDITY
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PROFESSOR W. E. CASTLE
THE conservation movement now in progress has for its end to preserve for future generations of men the natural resources of the earth. But it goes without saying that the movement is useless unless there are to be future generations of men capable of utilizing those resources.
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article
429
429,430,431,432,433,434,435,436
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SNEEZING, SEA—SICKNESS, PAIN
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ALEX HILL
PHYSIOLOGISTS can not lay claim to a theory of pain. Even definition is difficult. The distress of bodily wants overlaps pain on the one side; fear, anxiety and similar mental states overlap it on the other. Excessive stimulation of certain organs of special sense, particularly those for touch, temperature and hearing, leads up to it.
PopularScience_19100501_0076_007_0003.xml
article
437
437,438,439,440,441,442,443,444,445,446,447,448,449,450,451,452,453,454,455,456,457,458,459,460,461
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THE CIRCULATIONS OF THE ATMOSPHERES OF THE EARTH AND OF THE SUN
THE TWO CAUSES OF CIRCULATION ON A NON-ROTATING EARTH
THE GYRATIONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE SET UP ON A ROTATING EARTH
THE CIRCULATION ON THE ROUGH ROTATING EARTH
THE LOCAL CIRCULATIONS
LOCAL VORTICES IN THE EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE
TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION
SOLAR PHENOMENA
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PROFESSOR FRANK H. BIGELOW
IT must seem rather ambitious to attempt to treat so great a subject as that of the circulation of the atmospheres of the earth and the sun in a single lecture. It is true that if it should be discussed fully, in the technical way, it would require a great many lectures, but of course there are at the same time certain fundamental principles which are common to all circulations that can easily be studied, and then illustrated by the known facts of the circulation in these two atmospheres.
PopularScience_19100501_0076_007_0004.xml
article
462
462,463,464,465,466
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THE REORGANIZATION OF AMERICAN FARMING
TABLE SHOWING THE AVERAGE YIELD OF WHEAT PER ACRE BY TEN-YEAR PERIODS FOR THE LAST TWENTY YEARS AND THE TOTAL PRODUCTION FOR 1908
NUMBER OF ACRES PER CAPITA
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PROFESSOR HOMER C. PRICE
FROM the beginning, American agriculture has been characterized by its extensiveness rather than its intensiveness. Land has been more abundant than labor and, in the aggregate, more has been derived from a small yield on a large acreage than could have been realized from a large yield on a small acreage.
PopularScience_19100501_0076_007_0005.xml
article
467
467,468,469,470,471,472,473,474,475,476,477
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INSECTS AND ENTOMOLOGISTS, THEIR RELATION TO THE COMMUNITY AT LARGE. II
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PROFESSOR J. B. SMITH
AND now, having given a very hasty and superficial statement to show how important a place the insect really occupies in the social economy, it behooves me to say something of some of the men whose labors made some of these facts and conclusions known.
PopularScience_19100501_0076_007_0006.xml
article
478
478,479,480,481,482,483,484,485,486
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ANCIENT CLIMATES OF THE WEST COAST
CRITERIA OF ANCIENT CLIMATES
PALEOZOIC CLIMATE OF THE WEST COAST
MESOZOIC CLIMATES OF THE WEST COAST
NEOZOIC CLIMATES OF THE WEST COAST
SUMMARY
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PROFESSOR JAMES PERRIN SMITH
WE naturally look at things from the standpoint of the present, and regard the existing distribution of climates as the normal one. But even in our own times there are slight fluctuations of climatic conditions, for we hear wonderful stories from our elders of cold winters and hot summers, and tremendous storms of former years.
PopularScience_19100501_0076_007_0007.xml
article
487
487,488,489,490,491,492,493,494
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SOME TESTS OF ACADEMIC EFFICIENCY
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RICHARD C. MACLAURIN
I HAVE come here from Boston for the simple purpose of manifesting the good will of an eastern institution to this vigorous university in the middle west. I need not remind you of the historical connection between Massachusetts and Kansas, but I should like to express the hope that frequent interchange of academic courtesies may at any rate keep alive the memories of that interesting connection.
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article
495
495,496,497,498,499
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THE PROPHECY OF FRANCIS BACON (1560-1910)
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PEOFESSOR RALPH BARTON PERRY
I. Bacon and the Spirit of Discovery.—There are several ways in which the importance of a philosopher may be estimated. He may be regarded as an exponent of his times; that is, as a representation in which the manifold tendencies of an age are focalized and idealized.
PopularScience_19100501_0076_007_0009.xml
article
500
500,501,502,503,504,505,506,507,508,509,510,511,512,513
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JOHN DALTON AND HIS ACHIEVEMENT: A GLIMPSE ACROSS A CENTURY
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PROFESSOR R. M. WENLEY
IT is a melancholy reflection that the treasure laid up by great men in our memories should be corrupted often by the moth and rust of error. But, after all, this mischance roots in the nature of the case. Necessarily, our views of the past are synoptic, because the daily details, even of big events, escape us, much more the complex, ceaseless pulsations of the persons who have served their time and place rarely.
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article
514
514,515,516,517,518,519,520
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE DEATH OF ALEXANDER AGASSIZ
CHARLES REID BARNES
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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IN the death of Alexander Agassiz, America loses its foremost naturalist, as a few months ago in the death of Simon Newcomb it lost its most eminent representative of the exact sciences. Both were born in the year 1835, and in a century preeminent for science both gave distinction to this country when it was relatively backward in scientific productivity.
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