Issue: 19100301

Tuesday, March 1, 1910
MARCH, 1910
5
True
76
Friday, December 5, 2014

Articles
cover
209
209
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19100301_0076_005_0001.xml
article
209
209,210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,221,222,223,224,225,226
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INSECTS AND ENTOMOLOGISTS: THEIR RELATIONS TO THE COMMUNITY AT LARGE
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PROFESSOR JOHN B. SMITH
WHEN your president first wrote me, suggesting that I should deliver the popular lecture required by the constitution of this society, he also suggested a subject: "WHat entomology has done for the world, and its future" The subject is an attractive one; but it required little consideration to decide that within the time at my disposal for preparation and presentation it was impossible for me to do justice to it.
PopularScience_19100301_0076_005_0002.xml
article
227
227,228,229,230,231,232,233,234,235,236,237,238,239,240,241,242,243,244,245
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THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS: ITS BASIS IN INTUITION AND COMMON SENSE
THERMAL EQUILIBRIUM
ATOMICS AND THERMODYNAMICS
MECHANICAL ENERGY AND HEAT ENERGY
SIMPLE KNOWLEDGE ASSUMED
LIMITATIONS OF MECHANICS
THERMODYNAMIC DEGENERATON
REVERSIBLE PROCESSES
IRREVERSIBLE PROCESSES
STEADY SWEEPS
THERMODYNAMIC DEGENERATION
KELVIN’S DEFINITION OF TEMPERATURE RATIO
THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS
HEAT ENGINES
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PROFESSOR W. S. FRANKLIN
IT is the object of this article to give a simple account of that fundamental principle in physics which is known as the second law of thermodynamics. No generalization of modern physics is of greater importance, not even the principle of the conservation of energy, and no generalization of modern physics is based upon such deeply seated and such widely diffused human intuitions.
PopularScience_19100301_0076_005_0003.xml
article
246
246,247,248,249,250,251,252,253,254,255,256,257,258,259,200,261,262,263,204,265,266,267,268
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CLIMATE IN SOME OF ITS RELATIONS TO MAN
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PROFESSOR ROBERT DEC. WARD
Climatology and Meteorology.—In a course of lectures dealing with the present status of meteorology the subject of climate, upon which I have the honor to address you this afternoon, finds an appropriate place. For meteorology and climatology are interdependent, and it is impossible to distinguish very sharply between them.
PopularScience_19100301_0076_005_0004.xml
article
269
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THE STRUCTURE OF THE WORLD-STUFF
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PROFESSOR HORACE CLARK RICHARDS
SCIENCE, and the humanities. How often are they placed in opposition. There is doubtless a utilitarian aspect of science which though admirable in itself tends to foster a spirit antagonistic to culture. But science is many-sided. And in the single-minded seeking for the truth amidst clouding obscurities, in the searching out the laws of the development be it of an atom, a tree, a man or a star, in the aim to express that unity which we instinctively feel is the key to the interpretation of nature’s marvelous complex, I feel that she earns an honored seat among the immortals.
PopularScience_19100301_0076_005_0005.xml
article
280
280,281,282,283,284,285,286
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THE RELATION OF THE LAW TO PUBLIC HEALTH
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ALFRED HAYES, JR.
PUBLIC interest in the preservation of health has generally found expression in a demand for legislation increasing the powers of governmental agencies charged with the protection of health. Boards of health, state and local, are more liberally sustained, have greater facilities for the investigation of disease and are armed with greater powers than heretofore, but nevertheless common law, that is, the great body of law which the colonists brought with them from England, has an important bearing on public health, chiefly in two ways.
PopularScience_19100301_0076_005_0006.xml
article
287
287,288,289,290,291,292
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INTERNATIONAL COINAGE
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THEO. F. VAN WAGENEN, E.M.
IT is quite impossible to discuss the subject of coinage without touching that of money. But the reference to the latter will be brief, and will consist mainly of a statement of certain fundamentals that are now practically accepted by all.
PopularScience_19100301_0076_005_0007.xml
article
293
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THE HUBBARD GLACIER, ALASKA
THE UPPER GLACIER
THE LOWER GLACIER
THE ICE CLIFFS AND ICEBERGS
RETREAT OF TIIE HUBBARD GLACIER
EFFECTS OF AN EARTHQUAKE
BEGINNING OF ADVANCE
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PROFESSOR LAWRENCE MARTIN
SOUTHEAST of Mt. St. Elias and the Malaspina Glacier, Alaska, in the fiorded upper part of Yakutat Bay, known as Disenchantment Bay, is the Hubbard Glacier. It is the largest ice tongue in this region, except certain tributaries of the great Malaspina glacier.
PopularScience_19100301_0076_005_0008.xml
article
306
306,307,308,309,310,311,312
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE WORK OF THE CARNEGIE INSTITUTION
THE LIFE OF PETER LESLEY
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE eighth year book of the Carnegie Institution of Washington gives an account of its activities during the past year. The appropriation amounted to about $650,000—about $467,000 being for the maintenance of its departments; $50,000 for minor grants; $30,000 for research associates and assistants; $54,000 for publication, and $50,000 for administrative expenses.
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