Issue: 19100201

Tuesday, February 1, 1910
FEBRUARY, 1910
4
True
76
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
105
105
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19100201_0076_004_0001.xml
article
105
105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124
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SCIENTIFIC FAITH AND WORKS
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PROFESSOE ARTHUR GORDON WEBSTER
In undertaking to do my part in the dedication of this splendid temple of science, I can but echo McAndrew’s prayer, and wish that I had the words of a poet to sing the song of science. For what true devotee of science does not look upon her as a star-eyed goddess, and feel within himself at times feelings akin to those of the poet when breathing the divine afflatus?
PopularScience_19100201_0076_004_0002.xml
article
125
125,126,127,128,129,130,131,132,133,134,135
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THE SWEDISH KRISTINEBERG MARINE ZOOLOGICAL STATION
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PROFESSOR CHARLES LINCOLN EDWARDS
NESTLED among the outcropping granite ledges and islands of the west coast of Sweden, lies the village of Fiskebäckskil, near which on Skaftö has arisen the Kristineberg Marine Zoological Station. The primordial mass of the surrounding rocks and hills was planed off in curved and deeply-scratched surfaces by the vast ice-sheet of the glacial epoch.
PopularScience_19100201_0076_004_0003.xml
article
136
136,137,138,139,140,141,142
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ERNST HAECKEL: DARWINIST, MONIST
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PROFESSOR VERNON LYMAN KELLOGG
IN 1859 Darwin’s “Origin of Species” appeared, and the struggle was on. In 1862 Huxley began his active participation in it, a participation brilliantly maintained until his death. In 1863 Haeckel, before an association of German naturalists in Stettin, declared the Darwinian theory to be the greatest step forward in the study of life that had been taken in modern times; and he prophesied for it the same importance in the understanding of organic nature that Newton’s law of gravitation had had in the understanding of the inorganic world.
PopularScience_19100201_0076_004_0004.xml
article
143
143,144,145,146
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THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOOD AND EVIL
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PROFESSOR T. D. A. COCKERELL
IN an ancient story, it is told how primitive man ate of the tree of knowledge, and thus lost his original simplicity. “And the Lord God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil.” In later years, we have reason to suspect, our ancestors returned at frequent intervals to the fateful tree, and took therefrom cuttings to plant in their own gardens.
PopularScience_19100201_0076_004_0005.xml
article
147
147,148,149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157
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AUSTRALIAN MORALITY
BIBLIOGRAPHY
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PROFESSOR IRVING KING
ACCORDING to the earlier explorers and missionaries and the careless travelers of even recent years, the morality of the Australian aborigines was of a very low grade. Almost all such observers agreed in placing them in the very lowest stages of culture.
PopularScience_19100201_0076_004_0006.xml
article
158
158,159,160,161,162,163,164,165,166,167,168,169
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THE GEOGRAPHIC ASPECT OF CULTURE
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STEPHEN ELMER SLOCUM
THE dynamic influence of geography in history has recently attracted general attention. The idea was developed from a philosophical standpoint by Hegel,1 about the middle of the last century, but only recently has it come to be regarded as of special significance.
PopularScience_19100201_0076_004_0007.xml
article
170
170,171,172,173,174,175,176,177,178,179,180,181
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THE SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATION OF HISTORY
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LYNN THORNDIKE
THE question, “Is history a science or can it become a science?” has long both fascinated and irritated historical students. A few think that they have already discovered a science of history, but in reality have made only a premature and primarily speculative attempt at a philosophy of history.
PopularScience_19100201_0076_004_0008.xml
article
182
182,183,184,185,186,187,188,189,190,191,192,193,194,195
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THE NATURE OF FATIGUE
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FREDERIC S. LEE
TO the conscientious schoolmaster the contemplation of a dissertation on the nature of fatigue can hardly seem an unmixed joy; for the subject is one with which he is already practically and sadly familiar. I may say at once, however, that I have not come here to remind you too acutely of this aspect of your professional work, your sensations at the end of a busy day in the class room.
PopularScience_19100201_0076_004_0009.xml
article
196
196,197,198,199,200,201
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A GREAT MARINE MUSEUM
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PROFESSOR CHARLES ATWOOD KOFOID
A LOGICAL and characteristic expression of the national spirit of modern Germany is to be found in the Institut für Meereskunde which was established in 1900 in connection with the Königliche Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität at Berlin.
PopularScience_19100201_0076_004_0010.xml
article
202
202,203,204,205,206,207,208
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE CONVOCATION WEEK MEETING AT BOSTON
DEDICATION OF THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING OF THE CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the national scientific societies affiliated with it held at Boston during the week following Christmas was as large and important as any gathering of scientific men that has hitherto taken place in this country.
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