Issue: 19090901

Wednesday, September 1, 1909
SEPTEMBER, 1909
5
True
75
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
209
209
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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article
209
209,210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219,220
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CAPACITY OF THE UNITED STATES FOB POPULATION
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PROFESSOR ALBERT PERRY BRIGHAM
IF any reader of these pages thinks, with a recent writer, that “ population is a vast and wandering theme,” we shall have no quarrel with him. No doubt the problem has a keener interest in such a country as Great Britain or France, where population approaches capacity or is perhaps beyond the permanent limit of resources.
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article
221
221,222,223,224,225,226,227,228,229,230,231,232,233,234,235,236,237,238
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PEALE’S MUSEUM
Peale, the Portrait Painter
The Museum
The Mastodon
The Museum in the State House
His Last Years
Later History of Museum
Peale as a Museum Director
The Influence of the Museum
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HAROLD SELLERS COLTON
AN almost neglected chapter in the history of the natural sciences in this country is that dealing with Peale’s Museum.1 Of the accounts of the museum that have appeared from time to time, one alone is worthy of consideration, being written from a scientific point of view.
PopularScience_19090901_0075_005_0003.xml
article
239
239,240,241,242,243,244,245,246,247,248,249,250,251,252
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THE THEORY OF INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT1
PHYSIOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT
APPLICATIONS
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PEOFESSOR FRANK R. LILLIE
ORGANIC development presents two aspects : that of the individual and that of the race, ontogeny and phylogeny (evolution). These are not two separate and distinct series of phenomena; on the one hand, the individual development is to a certain extent a record of the past history of the race, and the promise of future racial development; on the other hand, evolution is not a series of completed individuals but a series of individual life, histories; for the only road from one generation to the next is by way of a complete life history.
PopularScience_19090901_0075_005_0004.xml
article
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THE ORIGIN OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ITS APPROPRIATION OF EFFECTORS
III. CENTRAL NERVOUS ORGANS
REFERENCES
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G. H. PARKER
IN dealing with the differentiation of nervous organs, the earthworm affords a good example of a simple type of well-centralized nervous system. The central nervous organs in this animal (Fig. 1) consist of a brain or cerebral ganglion situated anteriorly and dorsal to the buccal cavity, right and left œsophageal connectives extending from the brain ventrally to the ventral nerve-cord which stretches as a segmented organ from near the anterior end of the worm over its ventral line posteriorly to the tail.
PopularScience_19090901_0075_005_0005.xml
article
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264,265,266
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ANOTHER MODE OF SPECIES FORMING1
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LUTHER BURBANK
THE more usual concept of the formation of species is by slow variations so well known as the Darwinian theory, which though attacked from every point, still is and must always in the main be accepted, for without question it gives the fundamental principles of evolution as had never been done before.
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article
267
267,268,269,270,271,272,273
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HENRI POINCARÉ AND THE FRENCH ACADEMY1
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M. FRÉDÉRIC MASSON
THE Académie Française is primarily a literary organization, and its special work is the preparation of a dictionary. But even in this enterprise it is desirable, as M. Masson points out in the document of which I propose to translate a part, to have expert assistance at hand in the matter of the meaning and use of scientific terms.
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article
274
274,275,276,277,278,279,280
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COLLECTING AND CAMPING AFOOT
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A. S. HITCHCOCK
EVERY naturalist wishes to spend a part of his time in the field, observing, taking notes and making collections. It often happens that such field work can be done best by camping. Methods employed by field naturalists while camping vary according to the character of the country and according to the objects to be attained.
PopularScience_19090901_0075_005_0008.xml
article
281
281,282,283,284,285,286,287,288
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THE NECESSITY FOR AN INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE
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IVY KELLERMAN
IT was urged by a certain Greek philosopher that in ignorance alone lay the real reason of wrong-doing, and that none who truly understood the right could thereafter be guilty of wrong. Ignorance in a narrower sense has been offered as the explanation for misunderstanding and consequent trouble of a more or less serious nature between nations and races as well as between individuals.
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article
289
289,290,291,292,293,294,295,296
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WHAT IS A LIVING ANIMAL? HOW MUCH OF IT IS ALIVE?
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DR. A. F. A. KING
CONSIDERING the second question first, the reply to it will depend a good deal upon education. An extremely ignorant person might answer that all parts of a living body are alive except the bones. It required some education before we medical men learned to realize, without surprise, that crude metallic bodies—bullets, pins, needles, wire sutures buried in our internal organs, nails driven into our fractured bones by surgeons, finger rings, scissors, forceps, spectacles, etc., left in the peritoneal cavity by careless operators—could remain in a human body without any immediate danger to life.
PopularScience_19090901_0075_005_0010.xml
article
297
297,298,299,300,301,302,303,304,305
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ABANDONED CANALS OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK
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ELY VAN DE WARKER
THOSE who have only a partial knowledge of the subject, regard the present time as the age of canals. They overlook the generations of time and the vast sums of money expended by other people who have held to the idea of the canal with a national fixity of purpose that has produced astonishing results.
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article
306
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
TENNYSON AND THE SCIENCE OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
THE REMINISCENCES OF SIR FRANCIS GALTON
THE EUGENICS LABORATORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON
THE INHERITANCE OF VISION
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE hundred years which began with the births of Darwin, Tennyson and Gladstone, and closes with the deaths of Meredith and Swinburne, has been a notable period in English history. Its two chief movements—the growth of science and the growth of democracy —are adequately represented by Darwin and Gladstone.
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