Issue: 19090601

Tuesday, June 1, 1909
JUNE, 1909
2
True
75
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
521
521
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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article
521
521,522,523,524,525,526,527,528,529,530,531,532,533,534,535,536,537,538,539
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THE TIDES: THEIR CAUSES AND REPRESENTATION
HISTORICAL NOTE ON THE TIDAL PROBLEM
GENERAL BELIEF IN A WESTWARDLY-PROGRESSING TIDE WAVE
THE IMPORTANCE OF STATIONARY WAVES SUGGESTED
THE TIDE-PRODUCING FORCES
EQUILIBRIUM OR LAKE TIDES
OSCILLATORY OR OCEAN TIDES
NO-TIDE POINTS
ATLANTIC-OCEAN TIDES
INDIAN-OCEAN TIDES
PACIFIC-OCEAN TIDES
TIDES AT THE ISTHMUS OF PANAMA AND ELSEWHERE
DEPENDENT STATIONARY WAVE
TIDES IN THE VICINITY OF NEW YORK
CONCLUDING REMARKS
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ROLLIN ARTHUR HARRIS
THE so-called problem of the tides has for ages engaged the attention of observing and thinking men. Before Newton established the law of universal gravitation, the whole subject was surrounded with an air of mystery, although the fact had long been recognized by many that in some manner the tides are governed by the moon or the moon and sun.
PopularScience_19090601_0075_002_0002.xml
article
540
540,541,542,543,544,545,546,547,548,549,550
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FACTS CONCERNING THE DETERMINATION AND INHERITANCE OF SEX
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H. E. JORDAN
SINCE the time of Aristotle numerous observations have been recorded concerning the phenomenon of sex. Long prior to this period, undoubtedly, men were vexed by such questions as: Why in the same litter of animals are some male and others female? Why in the same brood of chickens do some develop into hens and others into cocks? Why in the same family are some of the children girls and others boys? What determines that one animal or plant shall be male and another female? When does the sex of the organism become unalterably fixed? What is the nature of sex? A great deal of light has been recently thrown upon all these questions.
PopularScience_19090601_0075_002_0003.xml
article
551
551,552,553,554,555,556,557,558,559,560,561
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JOSIAH WILLARD GIBBS AND HIS RELATION TO MODERN SCIENCE. II
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FIELDING H. GARRISON
The Thermodynamic Potentials.56—In 1869 the physicist F. Massieu communicated to the French Academy of Sciences the discovery of two algebraic functions from which all the thermodynamic properties of a fluid may be derived.57 These "fonctions characteristiques” of Massieu contain in latent form two of the four relations which Gibbs derived independently from his general thermodynamic equation and which have since been variously interpreted as the fundamental functions or thermodynamic potentials of heterogeneous chemical systems.
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article
562
562,563,564,565,566,567
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SUGGESTIONS FROM TWO CASES OF CEREBRAL SURGERY WITHOUT ANESTHETICS
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PROFESSOR GEORGE TRUMBULL LADD
FOR the first time, so far as I am aware, there have been placed on record two cases of cerebral surgery, accompanied by somewhat extensive explorations of the brain-substance, without the use of anesthetics. The suggestions afforded, and the problems further opened, by these cases are so interesting from the psychological point of view that it seems to be desirable at least to call to them the attention of this association.
PopularScience_19090601_0075_002_0005.xml
article
568
568,569,570,571,572,573,574
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HYSTERIA AS AN ASSET
POSTSCRIPT
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PEARCE BAILEY
AT about the time that Commodore Vanderbilt was establishing in America the methods which made railway travel easy, a book was published in London which left untouched all problems of construction and management, but nevertheless played an important part in the economics of transportation.
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article
575
575,576,577,578
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NOTES ON CERTAIN PHILOSOPHIES OF THE DAY
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ALEXANDER F. CHAMBERLAIN,
I. The Rule of the Dead.—M. Le Bon, himself now in the other world, would have it that we are suffering inutterably from a sort of universal mort-main. There is but one real case of majority rule on earth, that of “those who have gone before.” Our masters and rulers are neither the select few among the living, nor the many-headed people, but the great hulking mass of the dead.
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article
579
579,580,581,582,583,584,585,586,587
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FORMATIVE INFLUENCES
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PROFESSOR G. J. PEIRCE
WHEN I was a boy in New England it was the fashion to decorate the windows of the drug-stores with masses of huge deep blue crystals of copper sulphate—blue-vitrol or blue-stone. These ornaments have vanished now, even from the country drug-stores. Their places are taken by electrical toys, patent medicines, even animals.
PopularScience_19090601_0075_002_0008.xml
article
588
588,589,590,591,592,593,594,595
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TRAINING COLLEGE TEACHERS
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W. B. PITKIN
YOUR American is quite willing to admit that his children, on commencement day, are not what they should be, but he is sure that he and his fellow taxpayers are not to blame. They support twice as many teachers as saloonkeepers. They have built all the machinery of education.
PopularScience_19090601_0075_002_0009.xml
article
596
596,597,598,599,600,601,602,603,604,605,606,607,608,609,610,611,612,613,614
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OKEFINOKEE SWAMP
HISTORY
GEOGRAPHY
CLIMATE
VEGETATION OF THE SWAMP
ANIMAL LIFE
INHABITANTS
HEALTHFULNESS OF THE REGION
ECONOMIC ASPECTS
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ROLAND M. HARPER
OKEFINOKEE Swamp, which covers about 700 square miles of territory on the southern borders of Georgia, is one of the least known areas of its size in the eastern United States. Its existence has indeed been known to white men ever since the eighteenth century, but very few persons capable of giving an intelligent account of it have ever explored it.
PopularScience_19090601_0075_002_0010.xml
article
615
615,616,617,618,619,620
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THE PROGESS OF SCIENCE
JUSTUS VON LIEBIG AND THE FIRST LABORATORY
SCIENTIFIC AND EDUCATIONAL MEETINGS
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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IT has been necessary to wait a long while for a biography of Justus von Liebig, but it has now appeared from the competent hand of Professor Jakob Volhard, of Halle, a chemist of distinction, known also as the biographer of A. W. Hofmann. Liebig and Volhard’s father were school friends; the young Volhard was treated almost as a child in Liebig’s family; later he was his assistant at Munich and succeeded him in some of his lectures.
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article
621
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INDEX
NAMES OF CONTRIBUTORS ARE PRINTED IN SMALL CAPITALS
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Abstraction, On a Very Prevalent Abuse of, WILLIAM JAMES, 485 Agriculture, Report of the Secretary of, 207 ANDERSON, ROBERT VAN VLECK, A Trip in Southernmost Japan with Early Records of its Discovery, 101 Anesthetics, Cerebral Surgery without, Suggestions from Two Cases, GEORGE TRUMBULL LADD, 502 Antarctic Expedition, Lieutenant Shackleton s, 516 Astronomical Problem, Famous, On the Closing of a, W. W. CAMPBELL, 494 BAILEY, E. H. S., The Art of Bleaching and Dyeing as applied to Food, 58 BAILEY, PEARCE, Hysteria as an Asset, 568 Baltimore Scientific Meetings, 203 BAUER, L. A., The Instruments and Methods of Research, 184 Biographical History of Botany at St.
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