Issue: 19090101

Friday, January 1, 1909
JANUARY, 1909
3
True
74
Friday, November 28, 2014

Articles
cover
2
2,3,4,5
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19090101_0074_003_0001.xml
article
5
5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18
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THE CAREER OF HERBERT SPENCER
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PROFESSOR LESTER F. WARD
THAT “the evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their bones," is one of those literary palindromes which may be read both ways. Probably there is no great man, who, from the standpoint of pragmatism, has not done both evil and good, but the question as to which predominates can never be decided to the satisfaction of all.
PopularScience_19090101_0074_003_0002.xml
article
19
19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30
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LINEAMENTS OF THE DESERT
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DR. CHARLES R. KEYES
OUR notions of the genesis of desert landscapes have lately undergone complete revision. In land-sculpturing under conditions of aridity we are led to recognize some entirely new phases of geologic operations. The principles deduced are not alone applicable to countries with excessively dry climates, but likewise to all lands of the earth.
PopularScience_19090101_0074_003_0003.xml
article
31
31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42
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ON THE THERAPEUTIC ACTION OF FERMENTED MILK
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C. A. HERTER
DURING the past year there has been in the United States a large increase in the use of fermented milk in the treatment of disorders of digestion and nutrition. A clearly discernible influence in bringing about this increase lies in the publications made by Professor Metchnikoff and his colleagues in reference to the fermented milk known as lacto-bacilline.
PopularScience_19090101_0074_003_0004.xml
article
43
43,44,45,46,47
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POETRY AND SCIENCE: THE CASE OF CHARLES DARWIN
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EDWARD BRADFORD TITCHENER
IN the autobiographical chapter of the “Life and Letters of Charles Darwin” occurs a well-known passage, in which the writer deplores his loss, in middle life, of the higher esthetic tastes. Up to the age of thirty, or beyond it, poetry of many kinds, such as the works of Milton, Gray, Byron, Wordsworth, Coleridge and Shelley, gave me great pleasure, and even as a schoolboy I took intense delight in Shakespeare, especially in the historical plays. . . .
PopularScience_19090101_0074_003_0005.xml
article
48
48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55,56,57
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A BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY OF BOTANY AT ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI. II.
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DR. PERLEY SPAULDING
THOMAS DRUMMOND9 was born about 1780. He is known to have been a native of Scotland, but the exact place of his birth is unknown, as is also his early training and education. He was a brother of James Drummond, the Australian botanical explorer, and is known to have succeeded George Don in the nursery at Forfar.
PopularScience_19090101_0074_003_0006.xml
article
58
58,59,60,61
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THE ART OF BLEACHING AND DYEING AS APPLIED TO FOOD
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PROFESSOR E. H. S. BAILEY
AT last the time seems to have come when the public will have to choose between those food products which from their beauty of coloring or their superior whiteness appeal to the eye, although they may be of doubtful wholesomeness, and those foods which are in their natural state, and have not been “processed” to make them appear better or more desirable than they really are.
PopularScience_19090101_0074_003_0007.xml
article
62
62,63,64,65,66,67,68,69
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MR. ROOSEVELT’S OPPORTUNITY AS PRESIDENT OF A UNIVERSITY
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PROFESSOR DICKINSON S. MILLER
AS one grows older one grows weary of mere generality and abstraction. It would be easy to expatiate at large in this article on the ideal of American universities and the best work that could next be done for them. That, or some of the elements of that, are my subject.
PopularScience_19090101_0074_003_0008.xml
article
70
70,71,72,73,74,75,76,77,78,79
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COMMERCIALISM
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PROFESSOR JOHN J. STEVENSON
THE pessimistic streak, woven into every man’s nature, becomes a broad band in the community when industrial interests are prostrate. During the past year, the men who during prosperous times lived in the solitude of their sorrows have come forth and have found appreciative listeners as they denounce our country’s sins and despair of its salvation.
PopularScience_19090101_0074_003_0009.xml
article
80
80,81,82,83
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FOREIGN ASSOCIATES OF NATIONAL SOCIETIES. II.
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PROFESSOR EDWARD C. PICKERING
A HISTORY of the sciences and of scientific men during the last two centuries, by M. Alphonse de Candolle, was published in 1873. A table is given showing the foreign membership in various societies for the four epochs, 1750, 1789, 1829 and 1869, at intervals of about forty years.
PopularScience_19090101_0074_003_0010.xml
article
84
84,85,86,87,88,89,90,91,92,93,94,95
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THE SCHOOL AND THE FAMILY
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J. McKEEN CATTELL
IN our complicated civilization a change in any direction may have unforeseen effects in other directions. If we do away with an aristocracy of birth, we leave room for a plutocracy and for politics as a trade; if we learn to use machinery, we throw into quasi-slavery a large part of the people; if we improve the means of communication and transportation, we build the tenement districts of the cities; if we develop a system of credits and exchange, we get public debts, panics, lockouts and congested wealth; if we use reason more, the surer instincts atrophy.
PopularScience_19090101_0074_003_0011.xml
article
96
96,97,98,99,100,101,102,103,104,105
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
WOLCOTT GIBBS
OTIS T. MASON
THE H. K. CUSHING LABORATORY OF EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE OF WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY
THE CONVOCATION WEEK MEETINGS AT THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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OLIVER WOLCOTT GIBBS, one of the few great men of science given to the world by the United States during the first part of the nineteenth century, died at his home in Newport on December 9. He was born in New York City on February 21, 1822, his father, Colonel George Gibbs, being one of the earliest American mineralogists, and his mother, Laura Wolcott, the daughter of Oliver Wolcott, secretary of the treasury under Washington and Adams, being an artist of ability.
PopularScience_19090101_0074_003_0012.xml