Issue: 19081001

Thursday, October 1, 1908
OCTOBER, 1908
6
True
73
Friday, November 28, 2014

Articles
cover
289
289
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19081001_0073_006_0001.xml
article
289
289,290,291,292,293,294,295,296,297,298,299,300,301,302,303,304,305
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SPOLIATION OF THE FALLS OF NIAGARA1
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DR. J. W. SPENCER
1. First Reference to Niagara—Champlain.—A few weeks hence there will be celebrated the three-hundredth anniversary of the foundation of the city of Quebec, by the Great Champlain. Out of this grew the Dominion of Canada. Although the establishment of the little settlement on the St. Lawrence River made Champlain most famous, it is not in this that his chief greatness lay, but rather in his wonderful explorations in the lake region of the interior of the continent, throughout a long life spent in the wilderness.
PopularScience_19081001_0073_006_0002.xml
article
306
306,307,308,309,310,311,312,313,314,315,316,317,318
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THE INDUSTRIES OF NIAGARA FALLS
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RAYMOND H. ARNOT
NOTWITHSTANDING the fact that the Niagara Falls region is chiefly celebrated by reason of its natural wonders, intelligent people are gradually coming to understand that here are to be found engineering works in the form of electrical-power development plants which are unrivaled anywhere in the world, and electrochemical industries which are likely to grow of greater importance with increasing knowledge of the electrochemical art.
PopularScience_19081001_0073_006_0003.xml
article
319
319,320,321,322,323,324,325
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THE CLASSIFICATION OF MATHEMATICS
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PROFESSOR G. A. MILLER
HERR VALENTIN, of Berlin, who has been working on a general mathematical bibliography for more than twenty years, estimates that the total number of different mathematical works is about 35,000 and that about 95,000 mathematical articles have appeared in the various periodicals.1
PopularScience_19081001_0073_006_0004.xml
article
326
326,327,328,329,330,331,332,333,334,335,336,337,338,339
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ACADEMIC ASPECTS OF ADMINISTRATION1
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PROFESSOR JOSEPH JASTROW
THE community of spirit that animates such occasions as this is an interest in the academic life—a conviction, studied or casual, sincere or perfunctory, that much of what makes life worthy has its source here. What more appropriate than to discuss the status quo, with a view to discover what forces are making for and what against the vital concerns of academic welfare?
PopularScience_19081001_0073_006_0005.xml
article
340
340,341,342,343,344
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THE SPECIALIST BLIGHT ON AMERICAN EDUCATION
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JAMES P. MUNROE
SPECIALISM is the order of the day. From the professor of Greek down to the “professor” who shines one’s shoes, that man is in demand who is disposed to concentrate all his energies upon the learning or the doing of one thing. Even our households have become infected, for therein is now to be found the very apotheosis of specialization.
PopularScience_19081001_0073_006_0006.xml
article
345
345,346,347,348,349,350,351,352,353
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SOMETHING NEW IN “FREEWILL”
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PROFESSOR GEORGE STUART FULLERTON
IT has been maintained that all men are born free and equal. Shall we accept this very broad statement as it stands? or shall we repudiate it as a palpable untruth, an absurd exaggeration of the actual state of things? There can be no doubt that from certain points of view, abundant objection can be brought against it.
PopularScience_19081001_0073_006_0007.xml
article
354
354,355,356,357,358,359,360
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THE LAWS OF SOCIAL ATTRACTION
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PROFESSOR SIMON N. PATTEN
SCIENCE is a powerful transformer of human thought and yet it is remarkable how little direct influence it has on the affairs of life. We live from day to day under the guidance of the same feelings and motives that our ancestors had long before the sway of science was felt.
PopularScience_19081001_0073_006_0008.xml
article
361
361,362,363,364,365,366,367,368,369,370,371
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THE PASSING OF THE STURGEON: A CASE OF THE UNPARALLELED EXTERMINATION OF A SPECIES
STATISTICS OF THE STURGEON FISHERY18
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WALTER SHELDON TOWER
THERE is little chance for doubt that the sturgeon was originally present in great abundance both in the coastal and the inland waters of the United States, since frequent mention of the species is found in the annals of the colonial period.
PopularScience_19081001_0073_006_0009.xml
article
372
372,373,374,375,376,377,378,379
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FOREIGN ASSOCIATES OF NATIONAL SOCIETIES
TABLE I.
SOCIETIES
TABLE II.
LIST OF MEMBERS
TABLE III.
COUNTRIES
TABLE IV.
SCIENCES
TABLE V.
SOCIETIES
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PROFESSOR EDWARD C. PICKERING
MEMBERSHIP in societies is, in general, a poor test of the qualifications of a scientific man. The case is very different, however, if we consider only the foreign associates of the principal national societies or academies of the world.
PopularScience_19081001_0073_006_0010.xml
article
380
380,381,382,383,384,385,386
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
DOCTORATES CONFERRED BY AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES
AERIAL NAVIGATION
THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF AQUATIC ANIMALS IN THEIR NATURAL ENVIRONMENT
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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FOR the past eleven years there has been published in Science each summer an article on the degrees of doctor of philosophy and doctor of science awarded by American universities. It appears from these statistics that during this period 42 institutions have given this highest academic degree to 3,093 students.
PopularScience_19081001_0073_006_0011.xml