Issue: 19080901

Tuesday, September 1, 1908
SEPTEMBER 1908
5
True
73
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
193
193
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19080901_0073_005_0001.xml
article
193
193,194,195,196,197,198,199,200,201,202,203,204,205,206
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THE BOTANICAL GARDENS OF CEYLON
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PROFESSOR FRANCIS RAMALEY
"AN English glass house glorified is the description which a British friend of the writer gave to the garden at Peradeniya, Ceylon. And such it truly is. The brilliant foliage, the strange orchids and pitcher plants, the luxuriant ferns, the uncanny screwpines, are just what one might see in a gentleman's conservatory—only more wonderful and luxuriant, grown taller and more fair.
PopularScience_19080901_0073_005_0002.xml
article
207
207,208,209,210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,221,222,223,224,225
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THE PREHISTORIC ABORIGINES OF MINNESOTA AND THEIR MIGRATIONS
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N. H. WINCHELL
IT would have been considered an act of great temerity twenty-five or thirty years ago to enter upon an investigation of the Indians of Minnesota in prehistoric time. But, thanks to the rapid progress that has been made in aboriginal research in North America, chiefly under the guidance of the late J. W. Powell and his associates in the Bureau of Ethnology at Washington, it is now necessary only to apply to Minnesota some of the great truths that have been established as to the Indians at large, and to designate under those principles what Indian stocks and tribes have inhabited the state in some of the centuries that preceded the advent of the whites.
PopularScience_19080901_0073_005_0003.xml
article
226
226,227,228,229,230,231,232,233
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THE MOVEMENT TOWARDS “PHYSIOLOGICAL” PSYCHOLOGY. IV
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PROFESSOR R. M. WENLEY
NOW that Herbert Spencer and Eduard von Hartmann have passed away, Wundt stands almost alone among living thinkers. The importance of his philosophical contribution ranks second only to his epoch-making career in psychology. Time forbids more than this reference to it; but I may add that, very likely, his philosophical attitude possesses a future.
PopularScience_19080901_0073_005_0004.xml
article
234
234,235,236,237,238,239,240,241,242,243,244,245,246,247
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THE PRACTICAL VALUE OF PURE SCIENCE
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PROFESSOR THOS. H. MONTGOMERY
THROUGH all ages men have asked, What is worth while? The answer has been, at least from those not stupefied by pessimism, that many things are worth the while : happiness, self-respect, health, friendship, honor, wealth, all these are worth having, and any work that helps to secure them deserves the undertaking.
PopularScience_19080901_0073_005_0005.xml
article
248
248,249,250,251,252,253,254,255,256
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THE PHYSIQUE OF SCHOLARS, ATHLETES AND THE AVERAGE STUDENT
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PROFESSOR D. A. SARGENT
IN the year 1893 Dr. W. T. Porter, now professor of comparative physiology in the Harvard Medical School, examined some 30,000 children who were attending the public schools of St. Louis, Mo. He found that among pupils of the same age, ranging from 6 to 18 years, the average height and weight of those who were in the higher grades were greater than that of those who were in the lower grades.
PopularScience_19080901_0073_005_0006.xml
article
257
257,258,259,260,261,262,263,264,265,266
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MODERN AND EARLY WORK UPON THE QUESTION OF ROOT EXCRETIONS
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HOWARD S. REED
AFTER the lapse of over half a century the one-time well-known theory of De Candolle has again come into prominence. The demonstration that De Candolle was essentially correct in his deductions revives interest in a phase of plant physiology which has been comparatively unnoticed for many years.
PopularScience_19080901_0073_005_0007.xml
article
267
267,268,269,270,271,272,273,274,275,276
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SILVER
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THEO. F. VAN WAGENEN
PREVIOUS to 1870 silver was reckoned as one of the precious metals, and possessed, by virtue of an unwritten agreement between the principal nations of the world, a definite value in terms of gold, viz., $1.29 per fine ounce. The metal was never purchasable at less than this figure, and usually commanded a premium, which, during the last century, ranged from nothing up to as high as ten per cent.
PopularScience_19080901_0073_005_0008.xml
article
277
277,278,279,280,281,282
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JAPANESE WRITING
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E. W. SCRIPTURE
SOME time ago a Japanese student handed me the following statement: In Japan we aim at two distinct objects in giving instruction in writing. One is to teach the children the mode of writing ordinary characters, and to make them acquainted with the management of the brush.
PopularScience_19080901_0073_005_0009.xml
article
283
283,284,285,286,287,288,289,290
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF HERBERT SPENCER
THE FINANCIAL STATUS OF THE PROFESSOR IN AMERICA AND IN GERMANY
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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SPENCER’S “Autobiography,” stereotyped during his lifetime and published in two large volumes shortly after his death in December, 1903, is now followed by two further volumes, a “Life and Letters,” prepared by Dr. David Duncan in accordance with a clause in Spencer’s will which read as follows: “ I request that the said David Duncan will write a Biography in one volume of moderate size, in which shall be incorporated such biographical materials as I have thought it best not to use myself, together with such selected correspondence and such unpublished papers as may seem of value, and shall include the frontispiece portrait and the profile portraits, and shall add to it a brief account of the part of my life which has passed since the date at which the Autobiography concludes.”
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