Issue: 19070501

Wednesday, May 1, 1907
MAY, 1907
1
True
71
Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Articles
cover
385
385
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19070501_0071_001_0001.xml
article
385
385,386,387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,396,397,398,399,400,401,402,403
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THE JAMAICA EARTHQUAKE1
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PROFESSOR CHARLES W. BROWN
WITHIN nine months three regions in the western hemisphere, geologically closely akin but geographically distant one from the other, have been visited by earthquakes, causing an appalling loss of life and property. In all cases the disasters have been preceded by minor earth-shakings for years, and the areas were known to be in zones of earth-unrest.
PopularScience_19070501_0071_001_0002.xml
article
404
404,405,406,407,408,409,410,411,412
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NOTES ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF TELEPHONE SERVICE
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FRED DE LAND
IN November, 1876, Graham Bell perceived the value and efficiency of the metallic circuit and advised its adoption for telephone service to overcome the inductive annoyances. On February 1, 1878, the parent Bell company recommended the use of metallic circuits for exchange service, although only three telephone companies had exchanges in operation that month.
PopularScience_19070501_0071_001_0003.xml
article
413
413,414,415,416,417,418,419,420,421,422,423,424,425,426,427,428
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SIGHT AND SEEING IN ANCIENT TIMES
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DR. CHARLES WILLIAM SUPER
WHEN we pass along the streets of our cities and large towns and observe the number of persons between the ages of twenty and forty who wear spectacles; or again, if we inspect the eyesight of the children of our public schools and of the young people in our colleges, we find that a large proportion of the present generation is afflicted with visual organs more or less defective.
PopularScience_19070501_0071_001_0004.xml
article
429
429,430,431,432,433,434,435,436
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THE CLASSIFICATION OF THE ARTS
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PROFESSOR IRA W. HOWERTH
THE conventional classification of the arts into useful, mechanic or industrial, and liberal, polite or fine is unscientific. It will not stand before even a superficial examination. Fine and useful are by no means mutually exclusive terms.
PopularScience_19070501_0071_001_0005.xml
article
437
437,438,439,440,441,442,443,444,445,446,447,448,449,450,451
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THE VALUE OF SCIENCE
CHAPTER IX. THE FUTURE OF MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS
PART THIRD. THE OBJECTIVE VALUE OF SCIENCE
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M. H. POINCARÉ
The Principles and Experiment.—In the midst of so much ruin, what remains standing? The principle of least action is hitherto intact, and Larmor appears to believe that it will long survive the others; in reality, it is still more vague and more general.
PopularScience_19070501_0071_001_0006.xml
article
452
452,453,454,455,456,457,458
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IS THE MIND IN THE BODY?
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PROFESSOR GEORGE STUART FULLERTON
A NUMBER of years ago the eminent anatomist, Dr. Joseph Leidy, told me that a modern Maecenas had offered to pay for the finest microscopes if he would undertake a search in brains for ideas. The professor, who never pretended to be either a psychologist or a philosopher, rejected the proposal on the ground that the investigation must be a profitless one.
PopularScience_19070501_0071_001_0007.xml
article
459
459,460,461,462,463
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DRUG ABUSES, THEIR EFFECTS ON THE PEOPLE
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J. MADISON TAYLOR
DRUG abuses have become so grave that at last the medical profession is compelled to correct them. The public should learn clearly our mutual positions in the proper and improper use of drugs, which are chemical substances found useful or necessary to combat the effects of disease.
PopularScience_19070501_0071_001_0008.xml
article
464
464,465,466,467,468,469,470,471,472,473,474
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ILLUSIONS OF VISION AND THE CANALS OF MARS
HALO
RAYS
CHROMATIC RINGS
APPLICATION OF THESE PHENOMENA
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PROFESSOR ANDREW ELLICOTT DOUGLASS
THAT fascinating mystery, the planet Mars, will again approach the earth this summer. Again the nightly watcher will note the diminishing snow caps at the poles, the dark areas of vegetation, enlarging with the welcome moisture, and, perchance a cloud or two that, lingering over the cold Martian night, is dissipated in the sunrise heat, revealing thus its character.
PopularScience_19070501_0071_001_0009.xml
article
475
475,476,477,478,479,480,481,482
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
BERTHELOT AXD MOISSAN
THE FOUNDERS OF THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
THE DIRECTORSHIP OF THE U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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IN the deaths of Berthelot and Moissan, France has lost its most illustrious chemists and the world two of its leading men of science. At the celebration held at the Sorbonne in 1901 in honor of the jubilee of the scientific work of Berthelot, Moissan said in his address: “As soon as you touch a question you extend it by generalizing it.”
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