Issue: 19060401

Sunday, April 1, 1906
APRIL, 1906
6
True
68
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Articles
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291
291
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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article
291
291,292,293,294,295,296,297,298,299
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THE QUEEN ANT AS A PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDY
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DR. WILLIAM MORTON WHEELER
OBSERYERS of ant behavior have almost invariably fixed their attention on the easily procurable workers, to the all but complete neglect of the males and queens. In the case of the males, this neglect is, perhaps, pardonable, for the behavior of this sex is extremely monotonous.
PopularScience_19060401_0068_006_0002.xml
article
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THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE GLACIAL HYPOTHESIS IN AMERICA
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DR. GEORGE P. MERRILL
GEOLOGY is preeminently a science of observation and deduction. Certain phases of it are, nevertheless, dependent upon advances in other branches. As the science grows this mutual interdependence becomes more and more apparent, and it is perhaps now questionable if further advance, aside from a purely geographic extension of knowledge relative to the distribution of geologic groups, is possible without calling in the aid of physics and chemistry.
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article
323
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THE EARLIEST PREDECESSORS OF COPERNICUS
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DR. CHARLES R. EASTMAN
THE first glimmerings of perception that presage the discovery of great truths, whether coeval with, or long antecedent to complete apprehension, possess for most minds a fascinating interest. Whether it be abstract ideas, epoch-making inventions or discoveries of fundamental laws, such as gravitation or evolution, matters not; the names of those who have contributed largely toward intellectual progress, even if they fell short of the whole truth—if they merely prepared the way for final discovery—become universally reverenced, or acquire at least a romantic interest, by virtue of their heraldry.
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article
328
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THE GREATEST NEED IN RESEARCH
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PROFESSOR M. V. O’SHEA
ANY student of social progress might learn a useful lesson if he would attend a convention of the National Educational Association, which, in the general character of its work, is typical of the numberless educational organizations existing among us.
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article
333
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MAKING GEOGRAPHY WHILE YOU WAIT
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THOMAS H. MACBRIDE
THOSE who read the daily newspaper, and the number of such is confessedly great, have no doubt been more than once of late mildly excited by certain sensational despatches from California, despatches intimating that certain large portions of that much-advertised commonwealth are actually rapidly disappearing from the sight and touch of men.
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article
336
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EXTRA DIGITS AND DIGITAL REDUCTIONS
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DR. CHARLES W. PRENTISS
ALTHOUGH the mammalian extremities are nicely adapted by their structure to the functions they perform, the number of digits frequently varies from the normal. Moreover, different degrees of digital reduction may be observed in the extremities of animals whose habits are apparently identical.
PopularScience_19060401_0068_006_0007.xml
article
349
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A SANITARY OUTLOOK
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SIR JAMES CRICHTON-BROWNE
ONE of the hopeful signs of the times is the popular interest that is manifested in health questions. No doubt, as Carlyle said, all men are born hypochondriac, and in all ages—never more so than in the present one—swindlers like Caliogstro have driven a thriving trade in well-advertised potions and specifics, but never before has health in the aggregate been the object of public concernment as it now is; never before have the scientific principles that underline its preservation and the practical methods by which these may be applied become, to the same extent as now, part of the civil polity of the nation.
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article
376
376
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SHORTER ARTICLES.
THE YELLOW-FIN ALBACORE IN CALIFORNIA.
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DR. CHARLES FREDERICK HOLDER, of Pasadena, reports that the coast of California has recently been invaded by a splendid new game fish, the Japanese hirenaga or kihada maguro called yellow-fin albacore, Germo macropterus (Schlegel). This has appeared in considerable schools off Santa Catalina Island in southern California.
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article
377
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE
SAMUEL PIERPONT LANGLEY
THE SOLAR OBSERVATORY OF THE CARNEGIE INSTITUTION
THE WARREN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
THE NEW ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM AND LABORATORIES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF LIVERPOOL
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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In the death of Dr. S. P. Langley, secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, America loses one of its most eminent men of science. Langley was born in Roxbury, Mass., on August 22, 1834, descended from long lines of New England ancestry. As a boy he was interested in astronomy, radiant energy and mechanical flight, and with his brother, now Professor John W. Langley of the Case School of Applied Science, he constructed telescopes.
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