Issue: 19060201

Thursday, February 1, 1906
FEBRUARY, 1906
4
True
68
Sunday, November 30, 2014

Articles
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99
99
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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article
99
99,100,101,102,103,104,105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112
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THE PASSING OF CHINA’S ANCIENT SYSTEM OP LITERARY EXAMINATIONS.
SAMPLE THEMES OF THE OLD SYSTEM.
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CHARLES KEYSER EDMUNDS
IN a previous paper we reviewed the subject matter of Chinese education and recalled the fact that there is not, and practically never was, a school system in China, though a characteristic method of instruction has prevailed for ages, which by reason of its imitative and servile nature has repressed originality and drilled the nation into a slavish adherence to venerated usage and dictation without supplying real or useful knowledge.
PopularScience_19060201_0068_004_0002.xml
article
113
113,114,115,116,117,118
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SAMPLE THEMES FROM THE LAST TRIENNIAL EXAMINATION (1903). ON SYSTEM AS MODIFIED BY EDICT OF 1901.
Group II. Modern Matters.
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Five questions or topics in such examination for the second degree are proposed for discussion in this group. We present selected ones from those assigned at four chief literary centers in North, Central and South China. Where we present less than five questions for one center, it is because those omitted are practically duplicated by those presented for other centers.
PopularScience_19060201_0068_004_0003.xml
article
119
119,120,121,122,123,124,125,126
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THE LAPSES OF SPEECH1
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PROFESSOR JOSEPH JASTROW
A SPECIAL interest attaches to the psychological relations of speech—an interest shared by the philologist, by reason of his recognition that the mode of use and growth of language, in spite of its arbitrary accretions, reflects the native traits of the impulses that gave it being; by the psychiatrist, for whom the observable disturbances of speech offer the most delicate and distinctive criteria of the nature and extent of inner defect; and by the psychologist, for its unique status as the embodiment and recapitulation, racial and individual, the record as well as the means of advance of the psychic endowment in efficiency, in scope and, above all, in analytic insight.
PopularScience_19060201_0068_004_0004.xml
article
127
127,128,129,130,131,132,133,134,135,136,137,138
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WHAT IS SLANG?
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PROFESSOR EDWIN W. BOWEN
To the purist slang is an unmitigated evil which makes for the gradual corruption and decadence of our vernacular. The pedant who is a martinet regards all slang with absolute contempt and abhors its use, because he believes slang spells deterioration for our noble tongue.
PopularScience_19060201_0068_004_0005.xml
article
139
139,140,141,142,143,144
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RECENT ADVANCES IN METEOROLOGY AND METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE IN JAPAN
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DR. S. TETSU TAMURA
TEN years ago, after Japan’s sweeping victory over China, the world was awakened to realize that the Japanese were more than yellow barbarians. And only a score of months ago, when Japan made a declaration of war, Russia scoffed at Japan’s overtures, and the world pitied her.
PopularScience_19060201_0068_004_0006.xml
article
145
145,146,147,148,149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157,158,159,160
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WITH THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION IN SOUTH AFRICA.1
VII.
VIII.
IX.
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PROFESSOR ERNEST W. BROWN
PRETORIA, the capital of the Transvaal, presents the greatest contrast to its ambitious neighbor forty-five miles away. Although it is 4,500 feet above sea level, nearly the average of the rest of the colony, the hills which surround it give the impression of a rather low situation, but it loses nothing from the numerous blue gums, willows and other trees which are to be found everywhere in the city.
PopularScience_19060201_0068_004_0007.xml
article
161
161,162,163,164,165
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SOME RECENT TENDENCIES IN MATHEMATICAL INSTRUCTION
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PROFESSOR G. A. MILLER
SEVERAL prominent writers have suggested that ‘pure mathematics’ should be called ‘free mathematics' in view of the great latitude of freedom both in subject matter and in methods of work.1 This view is diametrically opposed to the one commonly held. The student of elementary text-books on mathematics can not fail to be impressed by the close similarity in subject matter and in methods.
PopularScience_19060201_0068_004_0008.xml
article
166
166,167,168,169,170,171,172,173,174,175
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THE WEALTH OF THE COMMONWEALTH
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DR. A. C. LANE
IN these days of evolutionary theories and dominance of biology it has become fashionable to apply the analogies and language of biology in other fields—for the geographer to speak of mature rivers, and youthful drainage, and the sociologist and historian to speak of society and nations as organisms.
PopularScience_19060201_0068_004_0009.xml
article
176
176,177,178,179,180,181,182,183,184,185
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THE HONOR SYSTEM IN AMERICAN COLLEGES
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PROFESSOR W. LE CONTE STEVENS
A CRITIC who was fond of unusual statements once declared that ignorance and unconsciousness are the best tests of good health. The man whose digestive powers are unimpaired has no conclusive evidence of his possession of a stomach. Hunger may be referred to as an aching void, but the discomfort is not localized until the digestive machinery gets out of order and pain tells the victim that in some way he has abused an internal friend whose unknown presence has been a source of quiet serenity.
PopularScience_19060201_0068_004_0010.xml
article
186
186,187,188,189,190,191,192,193,194,195,196
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
THE WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNDER SECRETARY WILSON.
THE NEW ORLEANS MEETING OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS
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THE annual report of the secretary of agriculture is a record of scientific investigation and attainments by the national Department of Agriculture for the past eight years. The broad relations of the department’s work give the report a wide general interest, and it illustrates anew the many practical benefits which may accrue to every-day affairs from intelligent and well-directed research and experimentation.
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