Issue: 19060101

Monday, January 1, 1906
JANUARY, 1906
3
True
68
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Articles
cover
1
1,2,3,4
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19060101_0068_003_0001.xml
article
5
5,6,7,8,9,1O,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20
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WITH THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION IN SOUTH AFRICA
I.
II.
III.
IV.
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ERNEST W. BROWN
THE visit of the British Association to South Africa during the past summer appears to have established the idea that its activities in future are not to be confined to the British Isles. Two successful oversea meetings had already taken place; the first at Montreal, in 1884, and the second at Toronto, in 1897, and there seemed to be no reason why the suggestion of a meeting in Cape Town, made as far back as 1898, by Sir David Gill, astronomer royal at the Cape, should not be followed up.
PopularScience_19060101_0068_003_0002.xml
article
21
21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28
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THE FOUNDATIONS OF GEOMETRY
AN HISTORICAL SKETCH AND A SIMPLE EXAMPLE
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DR. OSWALD VEBLEN
GEOMETRY as a logical system took its first definite form in the mind of Euclid (about 330-275 B.c.); and since the edifice constructed by the grandfather of geometry has justly retained the admiration of all succeeding students, one can perhaps exhibit the modern researches on the same subject in no better way than by contrasting them with some of Euclid's fundamental statements.
PopularScience_19060101_0068_003_0003.xml
article
29
29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41
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THE CONTENT OF CHINESE EDUCATION1
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CHARLES KEYSER EDMUNDS
THAT China is at present in a state of transition along all lines, but especially in educational matters, is patent to all observers. To-day we should distinguish between the old China and the new China. In order to understand the transition now under way we must, of course, consider the forces that have made and characterize the old China.
PopularScience_19060101_0068_003_0004.xml
article
42
42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51,52,53,54
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THE GEOLOGIC SURVEY OF ALASKA1
ALFRED H. BROOKS
Older Explorations and Surveys.
Systematic Surveys.
Results.
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ADECADE2 ago the United States Geological Survey began its work in Alaska by sending a party of only three men to the territory, whereas in the past summer twelve parties, with an aggregate membership of fifty odd men, were there engaged in geologic surveys.
PopularScience_19060101_0068_003_0005.xml
article
55
55,56,57,58,59,60,61,62
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WHAT IS AN EAR OF CORN?
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E. G. MONTGOMERY
IT is generally thought that corn (Zea mays) originated from some plant like teosinte (Euchlaena), and that the ear is the result of the fusing together of a number of two-rowed pistillate spikelets, such as are found in Euchlaena. Hackel1 evidently holds this view, for he describes the pistillate flowers of corn as being similar to those of Euchlaena and borne on spikes, except that “the pistillate spikes (originally by monstrous or teratological development?)
PopularScience_19060101_0068_003_0006.xml
article
63
63,64,65,66,67,68,69,70,71,72,73,74,75,76,77,78,79,80,81,82,83
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SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD
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T. D. A. COCKERELL
SPENCER FULLERTON BAIRD was born at Reading, Pa., on February 3, 1823. He was the third child, as well as the third son, of Samuel Baird and Lydia Biddle Baird. Samuel Baird was a lawyer and a man of education and scholarly tastes, very much interested in natural history in a general way, although he could hardly be called a naturalist.
PopularScience_19060101_0068_003_0007.xml
article
84
84,85,86,87
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INTERCOLLEGIATE CONTESTS
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JOHN J. STEVENSON
THIRTY years ago, student organizations in the ordinary college were few and on a modest scale, laying no serious burden of any sort on the members. All were purely voluntary and members alone shared in either expense or advantage. Gymnastics were recognized officially in few institutions and such athletic clubs as did exist were for amusement.
PopularScience_19060101_0068_003_0008.xml
article
88
88,89,90,91,92,93,94,95,96,97,98
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
THE CONVOCIATION WEEK MEETINGS OF SCIENTIFIC SOCIETIES
AWARD OF THE NOBEL PRIZES
THE DETERMINATION OF SEX
TWO GERMAN DIRECTORIES
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS.
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THE American Association for the Advancement of Science meets at New Orleans from December 29 to January 4. The place of meeting is somewhat remote from the main centers of scientific activity, and the attendance will scarcely be as large as when the association meets in one of the sea-board cities.
PopularScience_19060101_0068_003_0009.xml