Issue: 19050901

Friday, September 1, 1905
SEPTEMBER, 1905
5
True
67
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Articles
cover
387
387
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19050901_0067_005_0001.xml
article
387
387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,396,397,398
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CHINA’S RENAISSANCE.
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CHARLES KEYSER EDMUNDS
So long as constant forces and invariable conditions characterize a phenomenon, it is more or less easy to determine its course. But no matter how regular any known part of the representative curve of coordinates may be, extrapolation is always precarious and fraught with uncertainties.
PopularScience_19050901_0067_005_0002.xml
article
399
399,400,401,402,403,404,405,406,407,408
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THE SCIENCE OF PLANT PATHOLOGY
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PROFESSOR FRANK LINCOLN STEVENS
FROM the time men first had interest in plants, knowledge of their imperfections or premature death has existed, without, however, definite conception that the imperfections in question really constitute a condition of disease. The Bible and the early writings of the Greeks and Romans contain references to what we now recognize as wheat rust, fig blight, insect galls and other of the more strikingly conspicuous plant ailments.
PopularScience_19050901_0067_005_0003.xml
article
409
409,410,411,412,413,414,415,416,417,418,419,420,421,422
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SLEEP AND ITS REGULATION.
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DR. J. MADISON TAYLOR
SLEEP as a factor in physical economics ranks in importance with respiration and digestion. Those who live normally, who throughout all ordinary exigencies maintain a natural attitude toward life, its strains and reponsibilities, may expect to enjoy a full measure of this restorative function.
PopularScience_19050901_0067_005_0004.xml
article
423
423,424,425,426,427,428,429,430,431,432,433,434
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STATE UNIVERSITY SALARIES.
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C. W. FOULK
R. F. EARHART
FROM time to time the question of the relatively low pay of members of the teaching profession is brought to the foreground in the public press. The statements made are as a rule only general in character, or if any actual figures are given for a large group of teachers they usually relate to those in the public schools.
PopularScience_19050901_0067_005_0005.xml
article
435
435,436,437,438,439,440,441
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NATURE AND MAN.
HON. FELLOW OF EXETER COLLEGE, DIRECTOR OF THE NATURAL HISTORY DEPARTMENTS OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM, LATE LINACRE PROFESSOR IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD.
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EDWIN RAY LANKESTER
IT is the pride of our ancient universities that they are largely, if not exclusively, frequented by young men of the class who are going to take an active part in the public affairs of the country— either as politicians and statesmen, as governors of remote colonies, or as leaders of the great professions of the church, the law and medicine.
PopularScience_19050901_0067_005_0006.xml
article
442
442,443,444,445,446
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GENERAL EDUCATION FOR ENGINEERS.
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PROFESSOR CHAS. D. MARX
THERE has been of late years a large increase in the number of students of engineering in our colleges and universities. An investigation made by Professor Raymond, of the Iowa State University, shows that the attendance in arts and science courses has increased in four years 15 per cent., in engineering courses 102 per cent.
PopularScience_19050901_0067_005_0007.xml
article
447
447,448,449,450,451,452,453,454
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QUACKERY.
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DUDLEY F. SICHER
WHAT impresses one in reviewing the literature, is the extent and ancient origin of quackery, and the ineffectual fight against it. Eight pages of the 'Index Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon-General's Office' are taken up with a bare list of books, pamphlets and addresses, exploiting quackery or aiming at last to deal it the long-evaded death-blow.
PopularScience_19050901_0067_005_0008.xml
article
455
455,456,457,458,459,460,461,462,463,464
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HOW CANADA IS SOLVING HER TRANSPORTATION PROBLEM.
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LAWRENCE J. BURPEE.
IN Canada the main lines of transportation run east and west, much more decidedly than they do in the United States. The Dominion is, roughly speaking, a vast parallelogram, three thousand five hundred miles long by perhaps a thousand miles deep.
PopularScience_19050901_0067_005_0009.xml
article
465
465,466,467,468,469,470,471,472,473,474
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THE ANCESTORS OF THE BIG TREES.
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EDWARD W. BERRY
THE big trees, or sequoias, have furnished a theme for song and story and have been a Mecca for the tourist for so long a time that any remarks regarding the size or longevity of the far-famed trees of Mariposa and Calaveras would seem trite. Their present isolation —for they are but few in number and do not seem to be holding their own in the struggle with the surrounding vegetation or with the cupidity of civilization—but adds to their majestic grandeur.
PopularScience_19050901_0067_005_0010.xml
article
475
475,476,477,478,479,480,481,482
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
HARVARD UNIVERSITY AND THE MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY.
THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.
THE DEPARTMENT OF A AGRICULTURE.
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS.
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THE proposed alliance between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University is a matter of more than local interest. Among the questions involved are the relations of technological to liberal and other forms of professional education; the advantages of great size to a university; and the share in the control of educational institutions which should be assumed, respectively, by the trustees, faculty and alumni.
PopularScience_19050901_0067_005_0011.xml