Issue: 19050801

Tuesday, August 1, 1905
AUGUST, 1905
4
True
67
Sunday, November 30, 2014

Articles
cover
289
289
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19050801_0067_004_0001.xml
article
289
289,290,291,292,293,294,295,296,297,298,299,300,301,302,303,304,305
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AN ECLIPSE OBSERVER'S EXPERIENCES IN SUMATRA.
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PROFESSOR CHARLES DILLON PERRINE
TOTAL eclipses of the sun are often visible only from out-of-theway corners of the earth, necessitating long journeys from the fixed observatories to observe them. The path of totality of the Sumatra (1901) eclipse extended from the southern Indian Ocean near the African coast northeast across Mauritius, thence across central Sumatra and the neighboring islands, Borneo, Celebes and New Guinea.
PopularScience_19050801_0067_004_0002.xml
article
306
306,307,308,309,310,311,312
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PUBLIC INTEREST IN RESEARCH.
1. Its Present Condition.
2. Its Possible Condition.
3. Its Possible Results.
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PROFESSOR JOHN M. COULTER
THE subject I propose to discuss seems to me both timely and important. I recognize that to many scientific men it is a subject to which they are indifferent or which may afford them passing amusement. And yet, there appear in it certain possibilities that may be worth consideration.
PopularScience_19050801_0067_004_0003.xml
article
313
313,314,315,316,317,318
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THE VALUE OF OLD AGE.
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JOHN F. CARGILL
DO the creative or initiatory faculties of the mind begin to wane at middle life? And would the ransacking of all historical data show that a majority of the greatest things in the world have been achieved by men under forty? To undertake anything like a positive solution of so great a problem is naturally out of the question; but one plain aspect of the matter may be shown—leaving it to the reader, or to some future writer having a passion for statistics, to determine upon which side are ranged the exceptions that prove the rule.
PopularScience_19050801_0067_004_0004.xml
article
319
319,320,321,322,323,324,325,326,327,328
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A SUGGESTIVE CASE OF NERVE-ANASTOMOSIS.
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PROFESSOR GEORGE T. LADD
SUCCESSFUL cases of the anastomosis of motor nerves presiding over different groups of muscles have been several times reported since 1897. Some of these cases have resulted in the transference of function between the flexor and the extensor nerves of the same extremity; in other cases, nerves serving so different purposes as the sympathetic and the pneumo-gastric have been successfully crossed.
PopularScience_19050801_0067_004_0005.xml
article
329
329,330,331,332,333,334,335,336,337,338,339,340,341,342,343,344,345,346,347
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A VISIT TO LUTHER BURBANK.
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PROFESSOR HUGO DE VRIES
FOR many years I had wished to make a study of fruit culture in California and especially of the production of new varieties. One reason which, more than others, made me decide to accept an invitation to visit California was the prospect of making the personal acquaintance of Luther Burbank.
PopularScience_19050801_0067_004_0006.xml
article
348
348,349,350,351,352
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SOME PHASES OF THE EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS IN CHINA.
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WALTER NGON FONG
IN dealing with any part of the educational problem, it is necessary for us first to define our field. In this paper we shall consider the subject from the standpoint of one endeavoring to introduce ‘western’ learning among the Chinese. The fact that the Chinese do want to adopt western ideas and learning does not facilitate the task of regenerating the Chinese mind to as great a degree as the casual observer might suppose.
PopularScience_19050801_0067_004_0007.xml
article
353
353,354,355,356,357,358,359,360,361,362
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THE SOCIAL PHASE OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.
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PRESIDENT KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD
I HAVE been asked to speak in behalf of the study of ‘Rural Economics' This term is, I presume, supposed to cover broadly those subjects which treat of the economic and social questions that concern farming and farmers. The whole range of social science as applied to rural conditions is thus apparently made legitimate territory for discussion.
PopularScience_19050801_0067_004_0008.xml
article
363
363,364,365,366,367,368,369,370,371
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EDUCATION FOR EFFICIENCY.
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DR. W. H. MAXWELL
THE National Educational Association meets in its forty-fourth annual convention at the moment when Japan has given the world another great object lesson in the value of education. Ever since Napoleon’s retreat from Moscow, the world has stood in awe of that massive and mysterious power which we call Russia.
PopularScience_19050801_0067_004_0009.xml
article
372
372,373,374,375,376
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ADDRESS OF PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT BEFORE THE NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION.
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I AM peculiarly pleased to have the chance of addressing this association, for in all this democratic land there is no more genuinely democratic association than this. It is truly democratic, because here each member meets every other member as his peer without regard to whether he is the president of one of the great universities or the newest recruit to that high and honorable profession which has in its charge the upbringing and training of those boys and girls who in a few short years will themselves be settling the destinies of this nation.
PopularScience_19050801_0067_004_0010.xml
article
377
377,378,379,380,381,382,383,384,385,386,387,388
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
THE NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION.
THE COLLEGE COURSE.
THE CUTIVATION OF MARINE AND FRESHWATER ANIMALS IN JAPAN.
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS.
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THE National Educational Association held one of its great assemblages on the New Jersey coast during the first week of July. No official report of the registration was given out, but the attendance was estimated at 15,000, some newspapers placing it as high as 20,000.
PopularScience_19050801_0067_004_0011.xml