Issue: 19050401

Saturday, April 1, 1905
APRIL, 1905
6
True
66
Friday, November 28, 2014

Articles
cover
489
489
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19050401_0066_006_0001.xml
article
489
489,490,491,492
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THE MENACE TO NIAGARA.
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JOHN M. CLARKE
FORECASTS by eminent geologists of the future of Niagara Falls have been much in the public eye and have lost some of their novelty though none of their interest. The great cataract, it is said, is committing suicide, and the physical factors which enter into the process have, it is thought, been carefully weighed.
PopularScience_19050401_0066_006_0002.xml
article
493
493,494,495,496,497,498,499,500,501,502,503,504
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THE MENACE TO NIAGARA.
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The use of Niagara waters for power production has been the dream of years and its earliest successful achievement is expressed in the present Niagara Falls Hydraulic Power & Manufacturing Co., whose existence as an active consumer of Niagara water antedates its statutory recognition.
PopularScience_19050401_0066_006_0003.xml
article
505
505,506,507,508,509,510,511,512,513,514
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SUNSPOTS AND WEATHER.
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PROFESSOR ERNEST W. BROWN
IT is perhaps not far from the truth to say that the most pressing problem, as far as the daily needs of humanity are concerned, consists in finding some method of predicting the weather. Of the great value which a solution would have it is not necessary to say a word.
PopularScience_19050401_0066_006_0004.xml
article
515
515,516,517,518,519,520,521,522,523,524,525,526,527,528,529,530
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MEDICAL RESEARCH: ITS PLACE IN THE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL.
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THEOBALD SMITH
IF there be one word which is heard most frequently in the most intelligent circles interested in professional education to-day, it is the word research. In our own country in recent years medicine has fallen under its sway, and on all sides efforts are being made to meet its demands by the erection and equipment of costly laboratories within whose walls research may be carried on in a continuous and orderly manner.
PopularScience_19050401_0066_006_0005.xml
article
531
531,532,533,534,535,536,537
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THE PROBLEM OF IMMIGRATION.
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ALLAN McLAUGHLIN
AS has been pointed out, the extension of our immigration inspection service to the Canadian and Mexican frontiers, and the splendid work done on the border by the immigration officers, have closed the last gateways open to violators of our immigration laws.
PopularScience_19050401_0066_006_0006.xml
article
538
538,539,540,541,542,543
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AGE AND EMINENCE.
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PROFESSOR EDWIN G. DEXTER
SELDOM has the popular mind been so deeply moved by the casual utterance of a savant as in the recent instance of Dr. Osler’s now famous valedictory at Johns Hopkins. Nothing was probably more foreign to the speaker’s mind than an intention to stir up the tumult of newspaper contention that followed his remarks, and we may presume that he is not altogether pleased at the exact character of the notoriety which he has achieved.
PopularScience_19050401_0066_006_0007.xml
article
544
544,545,546,547,548,549,550,551,552,553,554,555
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AUTHORITY IN ENGLISH PRONUNCIATION.
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FOR wellnigh two centuries a popular belief has prevailed throughout the English-speaking world that there should be a standard of pronunciation, which should be followed in all those countries where English is the native tongue. Many people, holding this view, assume that some such norm is unconsciously observed by men of education and culture, who, because of their influence and rank, are generally conceded the right to establish the customs of speech.
PopularScience_19050401_0066_006_0008.xml
article
556
556,557,558,59,560,561,562,563,564,565,566,567,568,569,70,571,572
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THE BERMUDA ISLANDS AND THE BERMUDA BIOLOGICAL STATION FOR RESEARCH. II.
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PROFESSOR EDWARD L. MARK
BEFORE speaking about the life in the seas I wish to say a few words about the Bermuda Marine Laboratory. Not very long after my conversations with President Eliot, and when I was considering ways and means of providing an opportunity for students to work at Bermuda, I had the good fortune to make the acquaintance of Professor Bristol, and hear from him for the first time a glowing account of his experiences of several years, and his plans and hopes regarding a somewhat similar undertaking.
PopularScience_19050401_0066_006_0009.xml
article
573
573,574,575
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SHORTER ARTICLES AND DISCUSSION.
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OLIVIA R. FERNOW
IN a very interesting article in the March number of the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, Dr. Smith discusses a subject which is vital to the well-being of our nation. The evils which he deplores are real and serious, but they are caused, I would submit, not by excess of education, as Dr. Smith has it, but by excess of luxury and indolence.
PopularScience_19050401_0066_006_0010.xml
article
576
576,577,578,579,580
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
THE BIRTH RATE AGAIN.
NEW ACADEMIC BUILDINGS.
ALBERT BEE JAMIE PRESCOTT.
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS.
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY has printed several articles on the birth rate, and especially on the relation of higher education to the decreasing size of the family, as the subject appears to be of such consequence that it should be brought within the range of scientific treatment.
PopularScience_19050401_0066_006_0011.xml
advertisement
581
581,582,583,584
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Advertisement
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