Issue: 19040801

Monday, August 1, 1904
AUGUST, 1904
4
True
65
Friday, December 26, 2014

Articles
cover
289
289
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19040801_0065_004_0001.xml
article
289
289,290,291,292,293,294,295,296,297
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THE CONFLICT OF RELIGION AND SCIENCE.
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EDWARD S. HOLDEN
THERE are many books that deal specifically with a supposed conflict between religion and science, or with a warfare between science and dogmatic theology. It is my conviction that the view-point of most books of the sort is badly chosen, and I desire in this preface to set forth briefly the reasons for thinking that the battle has often been joined on a wrong issue.
PopularScience_19040801_0065_004_0002.xml
article
298
298,299,300,301,302,303,304,305
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THE GREAT WHITE PLAGUE.
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DR. JOHN B. HUBER
IT is with a very real sense of melancholy that one contemplates the long death-roll of those of the world’s great men and women who have succumbed untimely to the tubercle bacillus, which is and has been through countless generations by far the most potent of all deathdealing agencies.
PopularScience_19040801_0065_004_0003.xml
article
306
306,307,308,309,310,311,312,313,314,315,316,317
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THE DISCOVERY OF THE NATIVE HOME OF THE SAN JOSE SCALE IN EASTERN CHINA AND THE IMPORTATION OF ITS NATURAL ENEMY.
Explorations in Japan.
Explorations in China.
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C. L. MARLATT
THE insect which has had the greatest international importance and has been the subject of more interstate and foreign legislation than all the other insect enemies of plants together is a Chinese bark-louse of deciduous trees, known from its first point of colonization in America as the San Jose scale.
PopularScience_19040801_0065_004_0004.xml
article
318
318,319,320,321,322
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SAVING THE MISSISSIPPI’S SOURCE.
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H. M. KINGERY
THE true American takes an honest pride in recounting the natural features of our country—its mountains, plains, lakes, rivers, cataracts, trees—all, in Yankee parlance, ‘the greatest things on earth.’ Of them all none is more truly worthy of admiration than the great river which practically spans our territory from north to south, draining an inland empire on its way.
PopularScience_19040801_0065_004_0005.xml
article
323
323,324,325,326,327,328,329,330,331,332,333,334,335,336,337,338,339,340
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SOME EIGHTEENTH CENTURY EVOLUTIONISTS. II.
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PROFESSOR ARTHUR O. LOVEJOY
II. Diderot.—Diderot was in even less degree than Maupertuis a contributor to the details of scientific knowledge; and the contrast between the work of the interpreter and that of the investigator of the facts of science is well shown in the relation of his theories to the discoveries of Daubenton.
PopularScience_19040801_0065_004_0006.xml
article
341
341,342,343,344,345,346,347,348,349
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ITALIAN AND OTHER LATIN IMMIGRANTS.
NORTH ITALIANS.
SOUTH ITALIANS.
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DR. ALLAN McLAUGHLIN
ITALIAN immigration was insignificant until 1880. In that year we received about 12,000 Italian immigrants, and since that time the number increased steadily until the year 1891, when 76,000 arrived in the United States. This number was not exceeded until 1899, when the total yearly Italian arrivals began again to increase and in the past year (1903) reached the astounding total of 233,546.
PopularScience_19040801_0065_004_0007.xml
article
350
350,351,352,353,354,355,356,357,358,359
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THREE DECADES OF COLLEGE WOMEN.
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FRANCES M. ABBOTT
THE following statements relate to the occupations, careers and matrimonial condition of the graduates of the first thirty classes of Vassar College, from 1867 to 1896, inclusive. The records of 1,302 women are included. The information is taken from the last general catalogue, which gives the history of all the classes to the end of the century; but the last four, 1897-1900, are not considered in this article.
PopularScience_19040801_0065_004_0008.xml
article
360
360,361,362,363,364,365,366,367,368,369
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DEXTRALITY AND SINISTRALITY.
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DR. GEORGE M. GOULD
THE theories that have been advanced as to the origin of dextrality and sinistrality are: 1. A natural provision. (Sir Charles Bell, and others.) 2. The left-sided location of the heart. (Referred to by Wilson.) 3. A greater supply of nerve force to the muscles because of an earlier and greater development of the brain upon one side.
PopularScience_19040801_0065_004_0009.xml
article
370
370,371,372
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THE LAKES OF NEW ZEALAND.*
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KEITH LUCAS
IT is difficult to make general statements which will sum up any points in the morphology of the lakes of New Zealand. This difficult}’ arises in the main from the strange heterogeneity of the lakebasins. It would be hard, for example, to find any points of resemblance between two lakes such as Taupo and Wakatipu.
PopularScience_19040801_0065_004_0010.xml
article
373
373,374,375,376,377
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SHORTER ARTICLES AND DISCUSSION.
CHARACTERISTIC CURVES OF COMPOSITION.
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IN the June number of this journal there appeared an interesting article by Dr. Robert E. Moritz, on ‘ The Significance of Characteristic Curves of Composition,' mostly devoted to an examination and criticism of some conclusions stated by me in a paper published nearly twenty years ago and practically applied in another paper published in 1901.
PopularScience_19040801_0065_004_0011.xml
article
378
378,379,380,381,382,383,384,385,386
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
THE LE CONTE MEMORIAL LODGE.
SIR WILLIAM FLOWER.
GEOLOGICAL PHOTOGRAPHS.
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS.
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JOSEPH LE CONTE died in the Yosemite Valley in 1901, and a memorial lodge has now been erected there in his honor by the Sierra Club. As the illustrations show the lodge is built in a manner appropriate to its beautiful surroundings. The stonework is of leagues and friends, and members of the Sierra Club.
PopularScience_19040801_0065_004_0012.xml