Issue: 19040701

Friday, July 1, 1904
JULY 1904
3
True
65
Sunday, November 30, 2014

Articles
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194
194,195
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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A VISIT TO THE JAPANESE ZOOLOGICAL STATION AT MISAKI.
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PROFESSOR BASHFORD DEAST
JAPAN is not at its best in the rainy season. For the rain comes down in floods. And my first impression was that Misaki was a larger aquarium than even a zealous naturalist needed. We had left Tokyo at six—I was about to say, early one morning, but I recall that six is not early in Japan—on a small bay steamer which plies daily to Misaki.
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205,206,207,208,209,210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,221,222,223
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HUGO DE VRIES’S THEORY OF MUTATIONS.*
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PROFESSOR A. A. W. HUBRECHT
THE theory of evolution has influenced human thought in the most various ways during the past half century. In the sphere of biological science, where Darwin sowed the seeds which have grown up with such unexpected luxuriance, there has been a continuous process of fermentation which shows no signs of subsiding.
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article
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THE IMMIGRANT, PAST AND PRESENT.
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DR. ALLAN McLAUGHLIN
AFTER the Peace of Paris in 1783, and the birth of a new nation on the American continent, home-seekers arriving at ports of the United States were called immigrants. Previous to the revolutionary war they were known as colonists. The distinction is one of political allegiance.
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article
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WHY IS THE HUMAN EAR IMMOBILE?
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DR. WALTER SMITH
THE ear has had a varied history. The evolutionist has a remarkable story to tell when he recounts the steps in the making of this organ. He traces the opening of the ear to the gill-slits of the fish forms of whose lineage we are. He shows (though this subject concerns us less at present, and is still discussed with some uncertainty as to details) how various structures in the region of this opening, which had originally a different purpose, were modified to become the series of little bones that propagate the vibrations of the air from the tympanic membrane to the fluid of the inner ear.
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article
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SOME EIGHTEENTH CENTURY EVOLUTIONISTS.
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PROFESSOR ARTHUR LOVEJOY
A SATISFACTORY history of the theory of descent is a chapter in the records of human opinion that is still to be written. Meanwhile the subject is one about which persistent errors and illusions of historical perspective prevail. The popular mind appears to be firmly possessed by the belief that the doctrine of the evolution of species was a scientific innovation first promulgated, or at all events first cogently defended, by Darwin; the fame of the natural-selection hypothesis has become so great that its author figures, in the eyes of the great public, as the parent of the whole transformist system, while the earlier half century of controversy in behalf of that doctrine, under the leadership of Lamarck and of Geoffroy St. Hilaire, is forgotten.
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SALT.
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PROFESSOR CHARLES W. SUPER
EVERYBODY knows the lines in Lucile in which the author de dares that 'civilized man can not live without cooks.' He also proposes the query whether there is any man in the world who can live without dining. The assertion is true only with important restrictions; for it will not be contended by anybody that every person who cooks is a cook, any more than it would be affirmed that every one who paints is a painter.
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WALTER REED.*
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MAJOR WALTER D. McCAW
IT is given to but few scientific men to lay bare a secret of nature materially affecting the prosperity of nations, and the lives, fortunes and happiness of thousands. Fewer still succeed in so quickly convincing brother scientists and men in authority of the truth of their discoveries that their own eyes behold the glorious result of their labor.
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THE ROYAL PRUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE AND THE FINE ARTS. BERLIN.
VI. The History of the Academy under the Emperor William I., the Emperor Frederick III. and his son William II., the present Emperor, or from 1859 to 1900.
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EDWARD F. WILLIAMS
AS early as 1860 A. Kirchhoff, in an address delivered on one of the festival days of the academy, emphasized the change which had been introduced into the methods of scientific study. Research, he said, had limited itself to narrow fields with a view to the mastery of the least important detail in them.
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article
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SHORTER ARTICLES AND DISCUSSION.
ALUMNA’S CHILDREN AGAIN.
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AN article in the May number of the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, entitled 'Alumna’s Children,' was recently1 called to my attention by a woman who, though not a college graduate, is 'decidedly a schooled woman' and the mother of five girls. “ I had planned,” she said, “ to let all my girls go to college, but I do want to be a grandmother some time.
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
THE SANITARIAN AND THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
THE JUBILEE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN.
THE CHICAGO SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS.
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THE Sanitarian, established in 1873, and THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, established in 1872, are the two oldest journals in English devoted to the diffusion and popularization of science. When the Sanitarian was founded there was no journal occupied with sanitary ' science and public health, and the attention paid to these subjects was comparatively small.
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