Issue: 19040601

Wednesday, June 1, 1904
JUNE, 1904
2
True
65
Sunday, November 30, 2014

Articles
cover
97
97
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19040601_0065_002_0001.xml
article
97
97,98,99,100,101,102,103,104,105,106,107,108
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THE TOTAL SOLAE ECLIPSE OF AUGUST 30, 1905.
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PROFESSOR W. W. CAMPBELL
THE last total eclipse of the sun observed was that of May 17, 1901, whose path crossed the islands of Mauritius, Sumatra, Borneo and New Guinea. Its durations, in Sumatra six and a half minutes, was the greatest of any observable eclipse of the last half century.
PopularScience_19040601_0065_002_0002.xml
article
109
109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124,125,126,127,128,129,130,131
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COPERNICUS.
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EDWARD S. HOLDEN
NICOLAUS COPERNICUS was born in Thorn, a town of Prussian Poland, on February 19, 1473. His father, Niklas Koppernigk, was a merchant of Krakau who established himself in Thorn about 1450, and there married Barbara, the daughter of Lucas Watzelrode, a descendant of an old patrician family.
PopularScience_19040601_0065_002_0003.xml
article
132
132,133,134,135,136,137,138,139,140,141,142,143,144,145,146,147
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ON THE SIGNIFICANCE OF CHARACTERISTIC CURVES OF COMPOSITION.
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ROBERT E. MORITZ
A FEW months ago, while studying the variation and interrelation of certain sentence constants, as average sentence-lengths, predication averages and simple-sentence frequencies in prose composition, my attention was called to an allied investigation, directed by Dr. T. C. Mendenhall, which takes for its basis the words used by an author rather than the sentences.
PopularScience_19040601_0065_002_0004.xml
article
148
148,149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157,158,159,160
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THE PHYSIOGRAPHIC CONTROL OF THE CHATTANOOGA CAMPAIGNS OF THE CIVIL WAR.
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FREDERICK V. EMERSON
AT the opening of the civil war, the leaders of both sides clearly recognized three regions around which important campaigns must center. The confederacy was at a disadvantage in having no marked natural boundaries. The rivers and mountain led into rather than around it.
PopularScience_19040601_0065_002_0005.xml
article
161
161,162,163
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THE VALUE OF TEETH AS A MEANS OF IDENTIFICATION.
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ALTON HOWARD THOMPSON
I HAVE been reminded by the articles in the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, of the neglect of the teeth as a means of identification, which to me, as a practical dentist, has always seemed very remarkable. No system of identification that I am aware of has ever mentioned these valuable organs for this purpose, notwithstanding the facts that they are so varied in features and are so durable.
PopularScience_19040601_0065_002_0006.xml
article
164
164,165,166,167,168,169
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IMMIGRATION.*
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DR. ALLAN McLAUGHLIN
CAUSES of emigration may be considered according to their origin, and divided into three classes. (1) Individual—the spontaneous desires for better things arising in the emigrant himself; (2) local—existing conditions surrounding him in his old world home which develop and stimulate his inherent desire for social, political or financial betterment; (3) extraneous—outside influences operating from America or other countries.
PopularScience_19040601_0065_002_0007.xml
article
170
170,171,172,173,174,175,176,177,178,179,180,181
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THE ROYAL PRUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE AND THE FINE ARTS. BERLIN.
IV. From the Reorganization in 1812 through the Reign of Frederick William III., to 1840.
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EDWARD F. WILLIAMS
THIS period was a period of great men in almost every branch of learning, especially in science, of great statesmen and historians, of great warriors and rulers. It was a period in which the intellectual life of Germany developed rapidly, in which the gymnasia were much improved, in which the new science of teaching was created, in which the universities, more especially those of Prussia, stimulated by the standards set up at Berlin, became worthy of a kingdom and the patronage the world has given them.
PopularScience_19040601_0065_002_0008.xml
article
182
182,183,184,185,186,187,188,189,190,191,192,193,194
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
THE NEW BUILDINGS OF CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY.
DEVELOPMENTS IN THE RESPIRATION CALORIMETER.
THORIUM, CAROLINIUM AND BERZELIUM.
THE INSECT ENEMIES OF COTTON.
SCIENTIFIC EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS.
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS.
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ON the first of March four new buildings were opened at Cambridge by King Edward. One of these is a law school; the others are for the natural sciences—a medical school, a botanical laboratory and a geological museum. The great English universities have found difficulties in meeting the requirements of modern science.
PopularScience_19040601_0065_002_0009.xml